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Jeanne

Laguna Woods, CA, United States
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 7
  • helpful votes
  • 219
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  • A Voyage Long and Strange

  • By: Tony Horwitz
  • Narrated by: Tony Horwitz
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

On a chance visit to Plymouth Rock, Tony Horwitz makes an unsettling discovery. A history buff since early childhood, expensively educated at university - a history major, no less! - he's reached middle age with a third-grader's grasp of early America. In fact, he's mislaid more than a century of American history, the period separating Columbus' landing in 1492 from the arrival of English colonists at Jamestown in 160-something. Did nothing happen in between?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great read/listen

  • By Nathanial on 10-25-08

Parallel Voyages

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-10

I enjoyed every minute of this audiobook. Horwitz reads his own stories, as he describes European contacts with the "New World" prior to the Pilgrims' famous Plymouth landing. The contacts are numerous and varied. Horwitz made his own research voyages to the locales of these centuries-ago contacts, talking to the people who live there today as well as to experts on the location's history and archeology - often the locals are also the experts. Listening to Horwitz's stories of the people he meets during his parallel voyages is every bit as interesting as the historical records he describes.

  • The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • By: Edward Gibbon
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 22 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 97
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

No other work has portrayed with such clarity the march of Rome's empire into anarchy and ruin, and no...

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not Unabridged

  • By Lynda on 06-02-05

Poor quality audio

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-07

This is, of course, a great book. The trouble is that it sounds like it was copied from an old and worn out tape, particularly towards the end of the segment. The sound fades to almost nothing and then comes back, then fades again, then comes back. This is very distracting to the listener.

I've only listened to Part 1 so far, and I'm hoping Part 2 will be better.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Across the Nightingale Floor

  • Tales of the Otori, Book One
  • By: Lian Hearn
  • Narrated by: Kevin Gray, Aiko Nakasone
  • Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,580
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,632
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,647

A tour-de-force novel set in ancient Japan filled with passion, fantasy, and feuding warlords. The first volume in the highly anticipated Tales of the Otori trilogy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful epic story

  • By Jody R. Nathan on 10-04-03

Light entertainment

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-05

This book was fun to listen to, although it is entertainment rather than literature. I know virtually nothing about Japanese history prior to the 20th century, so I have to wonder at the accuracy of the historical and cultural setting. A glaring example of questionable background information are the various comments about unfair taxes. These comments "read" like 20th century USA Libertarianism. The author can reasonably assume we have a basic grasp of feudalism and abuse of power, but the juxtaposition of taxes and Japanese feudalism leaves me with more questions than answers. Absent further explanation, the issue of taxes adds nothing to the story. I can't help wondering whether Mr Hearn is tossing political plugs into his story, like product placements in a movie.

As other reviewers have commented, we are left hanging at the end of the story. I presume this is to leave us craving the sequel - kind of like watching an episode of ER and wondering what will happen to Julianna Margulies and George Cloony next week, same time, same station. Still, I plan to listen to both "Grass for his Pillow" and "Brilliance of the Moon," because this book was fun despite its flaws, and I have to say that I like Takeo and want to know how the rest of his life turns out.

I enjoyed Aiko Nakasone's reading. Kevin Gray left me confused, at times, as to who was speaking.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Reading Lolita in Tehran

  • A Memoir in Books
  • By: Azar Nafisi
  • Narrated by: Lisette Lecat
  • Length: 17 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 664
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 298
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 304

For two years before she left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and discuss forbidden works of Western literature. They were all former students whom she had taught at university. Some came from conservative and religious families; others were progressive and secular; several had spent time in jail.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A wonderful story

  • By Jayne Kraemer on 07-17-04

Well worth it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-05

This book is a combination of literary criticism, personal history and cultural insight. I learned so much about Iran and its recent history through the lives of the individuals I met, as well as by looking at western literature through Persian eyes. And that in itself taught me something about western literature and culture. I was sorry to get to the end of the book.

The narrator was pleasant, unobtrusive.