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Rachael

Arizona
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  • Heartland

  • A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth
  • By: Sarah Smarsh
  • Narrated by: Sarah Smarsh
  • Length: 9 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 388
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 350
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 350

During Sarah Smarsh’s turbulent childhood in Kansas in the 1980s and 1990s, the forces of cyclical poverty and the country’s changing economic policies solidified her family’s place among the working poor. By telling the story of her life and the lives of the people she loves, Smarsh challenges us to look more closely at the class divide in our country and examine the myths about people thought to be less because they earn less. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favorite memoir of 2018

  • By NMwritergal on 11-25-18

Understanding the Poor, WoWorking class, white girl - from rural America

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-19

In my opinion, everyone should read this book. But, this is especially true for anyone who has gone from rural America - to the city, in order to become college educated. Sarah Smarsh eloquently, yet realistically recounts the plight of the poor, working class, white - girl from rural America.

Further, the impacts of poverty on rural America are written about in a down-to-earth style. The imagery depicts the depth of social and economic struggles experienced among the working-class poor; a group often ignored in social scientific work.

For example, Sarah Smarsh explains the phenomena of “moving frequently” among rural, poor women in an illuminating way ....“we had moved 61 times by high school.”

Likewise, the author explains ‘the art of getting married’ among poor women, while simultaneously illuminating how poor children adapt by learning to distinguish a home (internal sense of security - permanent) versus a house (structure - temporary).

And finally, Smarsh was spot on in her observations and descriptions of the chronic health issues plaguing the poor. Of particular accuracy, was the prevalence of back/feet problems among poor women. I literally laughed out-loud at the relatableness - even the names seemed similar!

There was another major part of Sarah Smarsh’s Heartland story that I truly enjoyed - the part about “I’m a professor now.”

Here, two compelling scenes include one in which the author describes driving down a dirt road, during weekends returning home from college. And the other impressionable scene had to do with the intense experience the author goes through in coming to understand what being in a new class means after completing college. In my opinion, anyone who has experienced this profound transformation, will feel a sense of unity and comradeship in hearing this story.

I highly recommend this book and thank the author for “telling it like it is!”
Rachael Smith

  • A Higher Loyalty

  • Truth, Lies, and Leadership
  • By: James Comey
  • Narrated by: James Comey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 23,895
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,811
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 21,711

In his audiobook, A Higher Loyalty, former FBI director James Comey shares his never-before-told experiences from some of the highest stakes situations of his career in the past two decades of American government, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like and how it drives sound decisions. His journey provides an unprecedented entry into the corridors of powe, and a remarkable lesson in what makes an effective leader.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More Than Trump: All Comey's Life/Working Years--

  • By Gillian on 04-17-18

Offers an important perspective

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

I enjoyed Comey's book and insight very much. I particularly liked how Comey's describes how his own professional experiences shaped his work ethic and influenced his sense of ethical leadership. After reading this book, you definitely walk away with a better understanding about how politics influences, shapes, and strains the criminal justice system. Also, Comey offers a practical perspective in describing the organizational behavior within federal law enforcement that is relatable and refreshing.

In terms of format and delivery, I loved the Audible version. Comey narrates his own story and this makes all this difference in the world!the sincerity and fluidness of delivery is greatly enhanced because the author took the time to tell his story - literally. I love this.

For all students and speed-readers; I found an adjustment to 1.5 lx's the normal speed to be tolerable, but I enjoyed the narration so much, I choose to read at regular speed.

  • Ch 12: Race and Ethnicity

  • By: James M. Henslin
  • Narrated by: Mina Sands
  • Length: 2 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

James Henslin shares the excitement of sociology, with his acclaimed "down-to-earth" approach and personal writing style that highlight the sociology of everyday life and its relevance to students' lives. With wit, personal reflection, and illuminating examples, he shares with readers his passion for sociology.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A nice review

  • By Rachael on 01-02-17

A nice review

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-17

I found this chapter to be a nice review of contemporary issues involving race and society. This is written pre- 'black lives matter' yet provides a thorough historical analysis.