LISTENER

Fausto Cepeda

  • 28
  • reviews
  • 19
  • helpful votes
  • 38
  • ratings
  • Convinced!

  • How to Prove Your Competence & Win People Over
  • By: Jack Nasher
  • Narrated by: James Gillies
  • Length: 6 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15

Competence is the most highly valued professional trait. But it’s not enough to be competent, you have to convey your competence. World-renowned negotiation and deception detection expert, business professor, and mentalist Jack Nasher offers effective, proven techniques to convince others that we are talented, trustworthy, and yes, even brilliant. With Nasher’s help you can showcase your expertise, receive the recognition you deserve, and achieve lasting success. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow! Great great great.

  • By Fausto Cepeda on 01-30-19

Wow! Great great great.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-19

Ok, I hear a book every month, and since The Heart of Leadership from Mark Miller, I have not heard a book soo interesting. The book has not many ratings (January '19) so I was hesitating to get it. One review even said that the good stuff was in the very end of the book. Well, I just got it thinking if it was going to be good. Ok, Chapters 1-3 are the introduction, but from chapter 4...wow! Just very good tips that u can apply at work. Very interesting. Once I hear a book, I just go tho the next one, but with this book, I will re-hear it again and then I will write down the main points so that I can read them everywhere and remember to apply them in a daily basis...so yes, is that kind of book, the one that you go back to hear the good advice. So, get it, buy it and apply it, NOW!

  • Good Calories, Bad Calories

  • Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health
  • By: Gary Taubes
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 25 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,649
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,423
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,424

For decades we have been taught that fat is bad for us, carbohydrates better, and that the key to a healthy weight is eating less and exercising more. Yet despite this advice, we have seen unprecedented epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Taubes argues that the problem lies in refined carbohydrates, like white flour, easily digested starches, and sugars, and that the key to good health is the kind of calories we take in, not the number.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bold Explanation of Real Dietary Advice

  • By John on 08-27-12

Very long but nice investigation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-16-19

Ok, the book is long and many sections could be written in less space, but this is an investigation so it's really hard to decide which sections to avoid. So, if u buy it don't say "it's too long" because I'm telling you that now, if you buy it it's because you really love this topic and u want to know the little details of it so yes, then u know it has to be long but worth it.

  • You Are Not So Smart

  • Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself
  • By: David McRaney
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,432
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,998
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,986

An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise. You believe you are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is, but journalist David McRaney is here to tell you that you're as deluded as the rest of us. But that's OK - delusions keep us sane. You Are Not So Smart is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Based on the popular blog of the same name, You Are Not So Smart collects more than 46 of the lies we tell ourselves everyday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's official, I'm an idiot

  • By Christopher on 07-04-12

Kinda interesting but...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-16-19

It was kind of interesting, but nothing really like "wow!". Not like you can use many of the data in daily life. So yes, a lot of facts that you can never hear and u will be ok.

  • The Worry Trick

  • How Your Brain Tricks You into Expecting the Worst and What You Can Do About It
  • By: David Carbonell PhD
  • Narrated by: Stephen Paul Aulridge Jr.
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 494
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 421
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 420

Are you truly in danger or has your brain simply "tricked" you into thinking you are? In The Worry Trick, psychologist and anxiety expert David Carbonell shows how anxiety hijacks the brain and offers effective techniques to help you break the cycle of worry, once and for all. Anxiety is a powerful force. It makes us question ourselves and our decisions, causes us to worry about the future, and fills our days with dread and emotional turbulence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • wow!

  • By nf on 10-05-17

Good, but not great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

You are not going to learn a lot of helpful tips here, I thought it was going to be better. Yes, something new here and there, but anyway, I have not apply anything the books says. Before buying the book I started listing my worries and writing what would be the worst case scenario and how I would respond ti it if it happened. Also VERY important, I started to write actions I could do before the scenarios happened just in case they happened, I would be prepared. For example, a worry I have is that an airplane leaves me behind and that I miss my flight, that worries me a lot! So I listed that to solve that I would have to save some money just in case it happened in order to buy other tickets for another flight. So now I am not so worry about it because I know I can always buy another ticket for a later time. And also I listed things to prevent it like always asking at the hotel the time to get to the airport at the time of my flight and leaving earlier to the airport, etc. That has helped me more than this book.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Strategy Book

  • By: Max Mckeown
  • Narrated by: Max Mckeown
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 10

Thinking strategically is what separates managers and leaders. Learn the fundamentals of how to create winning strategy and lead your team to deliver it. From understanding what strategy can do for you through to creating a strategy and engaging others with it, this book offers practical guidance and expert tips. It is peppered with punchy, memorable examples from real leaders winning (and losing) with real-world strategies.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Many "what's", zero "how"

  • By Fausto Cepeda on 10-20-18

Many "what's", zero "how"

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

Ig this book was about diet, it would say something like "eat the right food", "eating is important in diet". Or maybe "eating has a direct impact in your weight", "eating can make you fat if you are not careful". And so on, I mean, what I just said about dieting is logic and you can't say I'm wrong, it's obvious! So I may be right, but what I just said about dieting is not going to help u in any way possible, you will agree with me, but that's it.

This book is like that, what the author sais about strategy is like "well, yes, I agree, sound ok", but nothing practical that you can really take to your life, and altough he attempts to give practical advice, it's in the form of "think about what strategy is best for u", "see the tendencies and adjust your strategy accordingly", and so on...I mean, I could just have written 75% of the book with general ideas and not specific advices...and of course I cannot say I am a specialist in strategy.

I regret buying this book, it didn't have many reviews but still I am interested in the subject, so I decided to hear it...big mistake. Save your time and money,nothing new here that you can meditate on or apply to.

  • Mindless Eating

  • Why We Eat More Than We Think
  • By: Brian Wansink Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: Marc Cashman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 713
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 407
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 400

In this illuminating and groundbreaking new book, food psychologist Brian Wansink shows why you may not realize how much you're eating, what you're eating, or why you're even eating at all.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Valuable information for anyone who eats.

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-18-07

Nice information

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

Is not about dieting or what foods to eat or not. It's about how you eat, how much you eat and that there is no "full tank" indicator to just stop eating when "full". What is full? What your brain says and it can be tricked to believe is not yet full, and of course those tricks are used by restaurants and companies to make you eat more than you need. The last part of the book was not so useful, but the first 75% is interesting and can help you to eat with care and to be aware of the tricks that are used on you.

  • Algorithms to Live By

  • The Computer Science of Human Decisions
  • By: Brian Christian, Tom Griffiths
  • Narrated by: Brian Christian
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,888
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,462
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,385

All our lives are constrained by limited space and time, limits that give rise to a particular set of problems. What should we do, or leave undone, in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance of new activities and familiar favorites is the most fulfilling? These may seem like uniquely human quandaries, but they are not: computers, too, face the same constraints, so computer scientists have been grappling with their version of such problems for decades.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • How do you prioritize when everything is top priority? I have an answer now.

  • By MaeC on 01-31-18

You need concentration to understand it

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

I hear books while on the road. So this book was so dense in its information that you really need to pay attention to what it says, and is not possible while driving. I would recommend to read it instead if u are interested. Or listen to it but while doing an activity that allows you to pay 100% attention. Maybe that way it could be a little interesting. So, I stopped in chapter 3 or 4. I give up. So, it was not useful for me.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Leadership Gap

  • What Gets Between You and Your Greatness
  • By: Lolly Daskal
  • Narrated by: Lolly Daskal, Marshall Goldsmith
  • Length: 6 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 113
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 113

When successful people begin to feel uncertain or challenged at work, the one thing they want to know most is why things are going wrong after they have gone right for so long. In The Leadership Gap, Lolly Daskal reveals the consequences highly driven, overachieving leaders face when they continue to rely on a skill set that has always worked for them, even when it is no longer effective.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent discussion on great leadership

  • By J. Miller on 07-28-17

Blah, blah, blah

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-18

Nothing new here, much is common sense, ideas repeated. I was just wishing the book to end, waste of time.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Trump: The Art of the Deal

  • By: Donald J. Trump, Tony Schwartz
  • Narrated by: Kaleo Griffith, Donald J. Trump
  • Length: 9 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,417
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,710
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,700

Here is Trump in action—how he runs his organization and how he runs his life—as he meets the people he needs to meet, chats with family and friends, clashes with enemies, and challenges conventional thinking. But even a maverick plays by rules, and Trump has formulated time-tested guidelines for success. He isolates the common elements in his greatest accomplishments; he shatters myths; he names names, spells out the zeros, and fully reveals the deal-maker's art. And throughout, Trump talks—really talks—about how he does it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Read to Understand Trump

  • By Stuart Draper on 02-20-19

General culture book, not much on making deals

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-18

Trumo narrates his past deals (mainly the 80`s) and you have to read between the lines to imagine his criteria to make his decisions he did. Yes, sometimes he explains it, sometimes not. The book explains some of the behaviors of Trump's President, but not all. Not going to leanr a lot about deals, but it is a start and of course, counts as a general culture book to have an opinion to say during reunions.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Everybody Lies

  • Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are
  • By: Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, Steven Pinker - foreword
  • Narrated by: Tim Andres Pabon
  • Length: 7 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,722
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,301
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,273

By the end of on average day in the early 21st century, human beings searching the Internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of information - unprecedented in history - can tell us a great deal about who we are - the fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than 20 years ago seemed unfathomable.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Might be worth it to get the book

  • By Laura on 08-09-17

Kinda like it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

The author uses Google data and shows results. Some of them are interesting, some others not so much. So, yes, big data can be useful and more if people dont lie to Google, u can get more accurate info. The data uses here is oriented to the USA. So yes, if u have time, read it, wont hurt.