LISTENER

M. Phillips

  • 8
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 26
  • ratings
  • Goodbye, Things

  • The New Japanese Minimalism
  • By: Fumio Sasaki, Eriko Sugita - translator
  • Narrated by: Keith Szarabajka
  • Length: 4 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,124
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,822
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,799

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo - he's just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn't absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Practical , Deep and Self-Reflection

  • By Anonymous User on 05-11-17

The Best Minimalist Book I Have Come Accross!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-18

I have read a handful of minimalist books as that's a lifestyle I would love to pursue. This one is by far the best I have read. Instead of telling you HOW to live your life (which is what many minimalist books end up doing), Fumio simply explains that the essential goal of happiness, regardless of what type of person you are, can be reached by eliminating all unnecessary things in your life, and that there are way more unnecessary things in your life than you realize. I love the simple and straightforward approach he uses to show minimalism and why it is so effective at giving you peace and happiness.
The narration was nice, pleasant and well paced.
Highly recommend this book to everyone who is struggling with this life journey and needs a radical simplification in order to reach peace of mind.

  • Born to Run Barefoot?

  • Sorting Through the Myths and Facts of Barefoot Running
  • By: Chas Gillespie
  • Narrated by: Kaleo Griffith
  • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 19

Two million years ago, Africa: A skinny, long-limbed creature who walks on two legs, can’t sprint, and has no weapons turns away from his under-nourished friends, and runs down a much stronger antelope. Dinner. Over succeeding generations, this creature evolves into one of the best distance runners on the planet: the human being. Yet in the age of modernity, we find ourselves unable to run without more than half of us suffering injury. This book looks at the injury epidemic in running and what the barefoot running movement believes are the causes of injury.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Short, but to the point.

  • By Mila on 07-20-15

More of a critical opinion on "Born to Run"

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-18

The author seems to be out to get Chris McDougall for "Born to Run". Essentially this is a critical review of minimalist/barefoot running idea presented in "Born to Run", not a comprehensive review of barefoot running in general. It was interesting perspective at times, however the author took it upon himself to say that McDougall encouraged barefoot running, when in fact only one person in "Born to Run" was running barefoot and was often told to put shoes on. Barefoot running was only presented as a thing that "Barefoot Ted" did and some runners do and why they do it. McDougall himself ran in normal running shoes, and so did majority of the runners so this entire thing focusing on McDougall endorsing barefoot running was just unnecessary.

Last critique is that at the end the author gives very conventional advise to running "Take it easy, stretch, buy good shoes, have a coach". So, it seems the conclusion is - don't run barefoot, do what everyone else does.

I still recommend reading it, as I definitely took away several good points the author mentions in the middle of the book, like barefoot running may be natural but if you haven't done it your entire life, your body will suffer if you jump into it head first. The key is taking it easy and training and stretching your feet, legs, muscles to run barefoot very gradually, which should have been the conclusion here.

  • Radical Unschooling

  • A Revolution Has Begun
  • By: Dayna Martin
  • Narrated by: Linda Velwest
  • Length: 3 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

Radical Unschooling is a progressive parenting philosophy, which includes children learning at home. It is different from homeschooling in that children are not forced to follow curriculum lessons and tests. Radical Unschooling philosophy focuses on trust of a child's innate ability to learn without coercion and invites children to explore their passions. The parent's role is to facilitate their interests and curiosity. Radical Unschooling - the book - focuses also on the evolutionary aspect of parenting and human consciousness....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible!

  • By Fancy on 09-24-12

Wonderful Intro into Unschooling Lifestyle!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-17

I absolutely loved this book!

The author guides through an easy to follow trail of introduction into an unschooling lifestyle heavily based on the author's family. It almost felt like she guided me gently into the waters to thigh high and then encouraged to dive in the rest of the way yourself.
Every concern I had got addressed as soon as it popped in my head which was very helpful. For example I love how she emphasizes that you can't expect to be perfect, and should expect to occasionally fall into the traditional way of reacting and thinking, which is encouraging because I'm nervous of having "perfection" loom over my head.

I loved the "Unschooling Moments" where the author describes actual instances of the positive effect the unschooling has had on her children and their family. I'd love to hear more as those felt like great examples to follow.

The only thing that was at times annoying was the narrator's way of speaking the dialogue almost in a mocking voice when other people were involved.

This book was very helpful and I can see myself coming back for refresher listens.
Thank you!

  • Predictably Irrational

  • The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions
  • By: Dan Ariely
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 7 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,045
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,884
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,883

In a series of illuminating, often surprising experiments, MIT behavioral economist Dan Ariely refutes the common assumption that we behave in fundamentally rational ways. Blending everyday experience with groundbreaking research, Ariely explains how expectations, emotions, social norms, and other invisible, seemingly illogical forces skew our reasoning abilities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well researched, well written, & well read

  • By Stephen on 03-18-08

Very interesting insights, worth a read for all!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-17

I had low expectations of the book, but I was very pleasantly surprised! Gives the reader a lot to think about how our actions are most often not driven in efficiency, but conformity. The author does a terrific job explaining the thoughts behind each test and covers a lot of ground. I learned a lot from the book and will definitely be recommending it to my friends.

The only thing I didn't like was that in some of the research cases I knew exactly why people acted one way or another, but the author called it irrational thinking, when in fact it was rational, just not efficient. Keeping in mind the strong human need for belonging, many actions don't make sense in a big picture, but make sense to each individual personally.

  • Barefoot Running

  • Minimalist Running for Efficient Weight Loss, Health, Fitness & Building Your Dream Body
  • By: Steve Plitt
  • Narrated by: Jim D Johnston
  • Length: 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 3

For centuries running has been a part of the daily routine of man and has been an essential task for survival. However, with modernization, and with the work-easing inventions that followed, the physical efforts man was once required to exert have now been considerably lessened. This quickly transformed running from a necessity to a hobby or a task. This puts man at a disadvantage, because the benefits that come with this practice are numerous. Download your copy now to change your life with Barefoot Running!

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • bad

  • By Marc Bundgaard on 04-26-17

Insightful, Short but to the Point.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-17

Where does Barefoot Running rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Definitely the shortest.

What did you like best about this story?

Informative, easy and practical.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes. Because it was so short.
The narration was easy to listen to.

Any additional comments?

It's a great book for a quick introduction into barefoot running. It's a perfect guide for anyone interested in the subject. It's got tips and tricks, how to ease into it, the dos and the do nots, and everything is put in simple, straight-forward, practical terms. Part of me does wish it was longer, and filled with some interesting stories, perhaps personal examples, views and opinions of others, but the content didn't exactly suffer from the lack of those either, and speaking on minimalism I guess less fluff and more to the point is the point. In short: I'm more confident about starting a barefoot running journey and will be referring back to this for guidance as I go on.

  • The Power of Vulnerability

  • Teachings of Authenticity, Connection, and Courage
  • By: Brené Brown PhD
  • Narrated by: Brené Brown
  • Length: 6 hrs and 30 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 22,294
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,837
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 19,605

On The Power of Vulnerability, Dr. Brown offers an invitation and a promise - that when we dare to drop the armor that protects us from feeling vulnerable, we open ourselves to the experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives. Here she dispels the cultural myth that vulnerability is weakness and reveals that it is, in truth, our most accurate measure of courage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The audio makes all the difference.

  • By Sadie on 09-14-13

Great message, worth a listen, but one sided.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-16

What did you love best about The Power of Vulnerability?

The messages were great and she had some very interesting points I loved that I have never heard before, and I have heard a handful of books like this.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

Most interesting was the work and the outcome of her researches.
Least interesting were the little judgement she tacked on at the end of each example story she brought up.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

The author states in the beginning that her writing skills are poor and hence she avoids it when possible, however, this was recorded as in front of audience performance, like a seminar of a sort, so there was a lot of reliance on her ability to do this as an audio book, which was a poor job. This might work better as a Ted Talk, but as a somehow educational audio book it's distracting to hear someone talk as if they are talking to a group of close friends.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. Over a few days worked well for me.

Any additional comments?

Even though the author says her writing is not as good as speech, I'd love to hear this as an audio from a read book.

  • Voyna i mir

  • By: Leo Tolstoy
  • Narrated by: Denis Nekrasov
  • Length: 62 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12

Roman-ehpopeya "Vojna i mir" - proizvedenie, porazhayushchee ehpicheskimi masshtabami povestvovaniya, istoricheskoj dostovernost'yu, iskrennost'yu izobrazheniya podlinnyh chelovecheskih chuvstv i ehmocij. Napoleonovskie vojny, Rossiya na perelomnom ehtape istorii pokazany vo vzaimosvyazi s sud'bami i lichnoj zhizn'yu udalennyh ot nas po vremeni, no po-chelovecheski blizkih i ponyatnyh nam lyudej. "Vojna i mir" - ehto i istoricheskij roman, i semejnaya hronika, i psihologicheskaya drama.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stunning Russian Classic (very large file)

  • By M. Phillips on 01-30-16

Stunning Russian Classic (very large file)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-16

What did you love best about Voyna i mir?

The fact that this is a classic and rightfully holds that mark.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Pierre Bezukhov and Andrei Nikolayevich Bolkonsky. Both characters seemed kind, simple and courageous, characteristics that makes them stand out in the story.

What does Denis Nekrasov bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The entire story came alive in a colorful and apparently accurate intonation of the reading of the book. Every character were vividly seen in my mind when I heard their parts read. Over 60 hours of reading and at no point did I feel the narrator show even a slight sign of drop of interest or excellence in his voice. Absolutely fantastic reading that kept me glued to my headphones, even though many of my friends and family who read the book said it can get boring and tough to read in many spots, thanks to the beautiful narration I was able to flow through the story without a hint of boredom. Bravo!

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

When Pierre begins questioning everything in his life and overall in the world and the meaning of all. Reminds me of my own similar questions.

Any additional comments?

I haven't had the luck to stay in my Russian school long enough to read this as all students do eventually, so I was eager to check that off my list of "must read" classic books. Leo Tolstoy's masterpiece did not disappoint. I am glad that despite my busy schedule I was able to hear this amazing book. It is a story revolving around the Napoleon Bonaparte and the time of wars related to Russia and it is told through several fictional Russian families. Many of the characters and events weaved into the story did exist and happen in history and Leo Tolstoy researched the wars extensively for this book, which shows through the quality of his writing. Each character is developed in a personal and vivid way. It amazes me how well Tolstoy could describe characteristics and thoughts of different characters that would be doable only to a psychologist with many years of experience. While the story is heavily focused around war and historic events of the time, there is much development of romance, family drama, comedy and many other aspects of life that keep the reader well interested and entertained throughout the development of the story.

I highly recommend this wonderful classic to all readers/listeners who appreciate a well written and narrated masterpiece.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Hold On to Your Kids

  • Why Parents Need to Matter More Than Peers
  • By: Gordon Neufeld, Gabor Maté
  • Narrated by: Daniel Maté
  • Length: 12 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 237
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202

Like countless other parents, doctors Gordon Neufeld and Gabor Maté have had to confront their children becoming secretive and unreachable. Focused more and more on their friends, they recoiled or grew hostile around adults. Why? The problem, Neufeld suggest, lies in attachment; children are increasingly forming stronger attachments to their friends than to the adults in their lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Life changing, hopeful and real

  • By Julia on 05-08-12

Essential Parenting Book!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-15

If you could sum up Hold On to Your Kids in three words, what would they be?

Mind-altering, Essential, Current.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Hold On to Your Kids?

When the realization sinks in how exactly parenting has changed over generations and what we need to do to correct the issues that have come up.

Which scene was your favorite?

When the author took his teenage daughters for a quick vacation to mend his relationship with them, how over time they warmed up and reconnected with him again (or as he calls it "reclaiming our children") as a good father-daughter relationship should be with respect, openness and understanding.

What did you learn from Hold On to Your Kids that you would use in your daily life?

I have learned to be present in my child's life, to reclaim my place as the nurturing parent not only to her basic survival needs, but also to emotional support and understanding to express unconditional love that I have for her, to enable her to grow into a confident and self-sufficient adult.

Any additional comments?

I have read many parenting books as a first time mom, being nervous diving into parenthood with only rumors and conflicting advice from well wishers. This book brings all my knowledge together into a complete confident understanding of my duties to my child and realistic expectations of her as an individual. I would highly recommend this book to any new or weathered parent because the ideas brought to light here I have never heard before but they seem so evident now that I know of them. This is the best guide to help parents understand their children and parent better. This is the only book that doesn't tell you "how" to do your job as a parent but it opens your eyes on points that make you understand what needs to happen to be successful.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful