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Janning

Tijeras, NM, United States
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 36
  • helpful votes
  • 91
  • ratings
  • The Hidden Life of Trees

  • What They Feel, How They Communicate - Discoveries from a Secret World
  • By: Peter Wohlleben
  • Narrated by: Mike Grady
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,583
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,292
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,278

How do trees live? Do they feel pain or have awareness of their surroundings? Research is now suggesting trees are capable of much more than we have ever known. In The Hidden Life of Trees, forester Peter Wohlleben puts groundbreaking scientific discoveries into a language everyone can relate to.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • As I suspected all along...

  • By Janning on 12-26-16

As I suspected all along...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-16

Trees are beings. We may not understand them very well yet, but that speaks to our historically human-centric approach to the world. The central chapters of the book were, for me, elementary in their approach to plants and their interaction with soil, water, and insects, because I have an advanced degree in plant sciences, but it would be understandable by anyone even without any science background. However Wohllehben's overall message of the need and the reasons to preserve forests as valuable environments is eloquent.

The best parts of the book, for me, are the early and the final chapters where the author makes an excellent case for his premise that trees do communicate among themselves and that we have so much yet to learn about the natural world. He also explains in beautiful prose why he loves trees and forests. I share his passion and hope that this book with introduce it to a wider audience. We would all be the wiser for it.

33 of 35 people found this review helpful

  • Round the Bend

  • By: Nevil Shute
  • Narrated by: John Telfer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153

When Tom Cutter hires Constantine Shaklin as an engineer in his air-freight business, he little realises the extraordinary gifts of his new recruit. Shaklin possesses a religious power which inspires everyone he meets to a new faith and hope for humanity. As Cutter’s business grows across Asia, so does Shaklin’s fame, until he is widely regarded as a unifying deity. Though he struggles to believe Shaklin is indeed divine, Cutter too finds solace in his friend’s teachings, and commits to passing on his message.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A wonderful book

  • By Gavin Scott on 07-14-11

An unanticipated gem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-14

Perhaps this book resonated with me because I've recently been to several of the countries of the setting - or perhaps because of the glimpse of history it offers, or maybe it was Shute's philosophy - but whatever it was, it grabbed me. A glimpse of the Asian world of post WWII, the growth a start-up aviation business the start of the middle East oil boom, the western world-view of Asia in 1945, and Neville Shute's philosophy of the the holy character of excellence in one's work, all meld together and produce an unusual, original story with memorable characters. It was an unexpected delight.

I had just read A Town Like Alice, also by Neville Shute, and wanted to explore some more of his work. Round the Bend is quite different, but both are excellent, satisfying stories.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Great Expectations

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 17 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 673
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 497
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 491

As Pip unravels the truth behind his own "great expectations" in his quest to become a gentleman, the mysteries of the past and the convolutions of fate through a series of thrilling adventures serve to steer him toward maturity and his most important discovery of all - the truth about himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This Dickens guy has promise

  • By Ed on 06-30-11

Not for Tenth Graders

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-14

I recall from a high school introductory course to English Lit the scene with Miss Haversham instructing Pip to "play," but very little else. I thought it was pretty pointless at the time. But recently, because I have been exploring 19th century literature through audio books, I decided to give Pip and Miss Haversham another chance. This time, perhaps because I have reached a certain level maturity, Great Expectations spoke to me. Now I understand why it is 'literature' and why Charles Dickens is still read and still relevant. The theme is timeless - a young man's head is turned from steadfastness, love and goodness by wealth and position, but he's a hero not a villain, and the lesson he learns is still relevant. Great Expectations is an adventure story, a love story, and a coming-of-age story. An excellent tale, well-read. A most satisfying listen.

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,549
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,257
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,271

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, insightful, intriguing.

  • By Peter on 03-05-10

Surprisingly good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-13

There was a point, rather early on, when I regretted my decision to listen to this audio book...but I am very glad I didn't give up so easily. The first half deals with Genghis Khan and his biography, which is interesting in itself. In fact, I was sad when it ended and wondered what could possibly follow that would be so interesting...but the second half deals with the aftermath of his death and his descendents, most notably Kubla Khan, the grandson of Genghis Khan, who was a fascinating mega-personality in his own right. By the end, I had learned a lot of history without really trying, and have a much greater understanding of events in 'ancient history' that had sailed right over my head in high school. Jack Weatherford brings the era of the great Khans to life with exhaustive research and events chock full of surprise, intrigue and detail. One of the best parts is the epilogue - the short story of the years of research for this book, and how it affected the author and others who were closely involved. Ghegis Khan and the Making of the Modern World is one of those books that sticks to your ribs long after it ends.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Our Inner Ape

  • A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are
  • By: Frans de Waal
  • Narrated by: Alan Sklar
  • Length: 10 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 210
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213

We have long attributed man's violent, aggressive, competitive nature to his animal ancestry. But what if we are just as given to cooperation, empathy, and morality by virtue of our genes? What if our behavior actually makes us apes? What kind of apes are we?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding

  • By Sherry on 10-26-06

Not Bad At All - For Non-Fiction!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-12

I read mostly non-fiction books. However, I have recently realized that in audio books, I really prefer a STORY. Driving down the highway, lost in a good story feels good and makes the time fly. When reading a book, as opposed to listening, I'm eager to learn about the world around, and don't require a plot and characters to hold my interest. So as I started listening, at first I regretted the snap decision to purchase Our Inner Ape. However, I preservered. And I'm glad I did.

This was a very enjoyable book, and I came away feeling like I understand our inner ape-ness a little better. It held my interest, especially the second half, and gave me a lot to think about while pondering human relations and global politics.

I didn't give it the full 5 stars because among the books I've listened to, there are better (all fiction), but it's a solid 4, especially if you're interested in our primate cousins and how we stack up against them.

  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

  • By: Junot Diaz
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Staci Snell
  • Length: 16 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,410
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,907
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,925

Things have never been easy for Oscar, a sweet but disastrously overweight, lovesick Dominican ghetto nerd. Oscar dreams of becoming the Dominican J. R. R. Tolkien and, most of all, of finding love. But he may never get what he wants, thanks to the Fuku: the curse that has haunted Oscar's family for generations, dooming them to prison, torture, tragic accidents, and, above all, ill-starred love. Oscar, still waiting for his first kiss, is just its most recent victim.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous listen

  • By Kathleen on 04-26-08

Not my cup of tea...I'm putting it aside

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-12

I finished Part 1, but it was mostly out of stubborness. I'm not inspired to go on, although the book did improve slightly after the first couple of hours. I didn't find any characters that I could identify with, maybe it's me - it's been a long time since I was a lonely teen. I just don't want to feel sorry anymore for poor, pitiful Oscar. There was some interest once the narration moved from the protagonist to his family history, but it just wasn't strong enough to convince me to spend any more time listening. Maybe some day I'll try to finish this audio book - discover why his life is titled "wonderous" ...it's that hint of a surprise that drew me in in the first place - but for now, I'm movin' on.