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Paula

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  • 10
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  • Four Princes

  • Henry VIII, Francis I, Charles V, Suleiman the Magnificent and the Obsessions that Forged Modern Europe
  • By: John Julius Norwich
  • Narrated by: Julian Elfer
  • Length: 7 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 58

John Julius Norwich - whom the Wall Street Journal called "the very model of a popular historian" - has crafted a big, bold tapestry of the early 16th century, when Europe and the Middle East were overshadowed by a quartet of legendary rulers, all born within a 10-year period. Against the vibrant background of the Renaissance, these four men laid the foundations for modern Europe and the Middle East, as they collectively impacted the culture, religion, and politics of their respective domains.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • For the most part, very informative.

  • By Paula on 02-05-18

For the most part, very informative.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

Since everything else in this book seemed so well researched, I was very disappointed when the author claimed that Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII's second wife, had 6 fingers on one of her hands. Any historian worth their salt knows that she certainly did NOT. This was a myth spread around by Catholic propagandists after her death.
Otherwise, I thought that this was a great book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl

  • A Memoir
  • By: Carrie Brownstein
  • Narrated by: Carrie Brownstein
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,400
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,300
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,291

Before Carrie Brownstein became a music icon, she was a young girl growing up in the Pacific Northwest just as it was becoming the setting for one the most important movements in rock history. Seeking a sense of home and identity, she would discover both while moving from spectator to creator in experiencing the power and mystery of a live performance.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • fussy

  • By Ex on 01-09-16

Easily One of My Favorite Books

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-16

Would you consider the audio edition of Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl to be better than the print version?

I haven't read the print version yet, but the author does such a fantastic job at narrating that I'd have to say "yes" regardless.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Definitely.

  • All the Rebel Women

  • The Rise of the Fourth Wave of Feminism
  • By: Kira Cochrane
  • Narrated by: Anna Parker-Naples
  • Length: 2 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

On a bright day at the Epsom Derby, 4 June 1913, Emily Wilding Davison was hit by the king’s horse in one of the defining moments of the fight for women’s suffrage - what became known as feminism’s first wave. The second wave arose in the late-1960s, activists campaigning tirelessly for women’s liberation, organising around a wildly ambitious slate of issues - a struggle their daughters continued in the third wave that blossomed in the early 1990s. Now, 100 years on from the campaign for the vote, a new tide of feminist voices is rising.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Good, Brief Overview of Modern Feminism

  • By Paula on 07-05-16

A Good, Brief Overview of Modern Feminism

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-16

Any additional comments?

This book is a good glimpse into the modern feminist movements and why they're so desperately needed.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Sex Myth

  • The Gap Between Our Fantasies and Reality
  • By: Rachel Hills
  • Narrated by: Callie Beaulieu
  • Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27

Fifty years after the sexual revolution, we are told that we live in a time of unprecedented sexual freedom: that if anything, we are too free now. But beneath the veneer of glossy hedonism, millennial journalist Rachel Hills argues, we are controlled by a new brand of sexual convention: one that influences all of us - woman or man, straight or gay, liberal or conservative.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must-Read

  • By Paula on 05-09-16

A Must-Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-16

What did you love best about The Sex Myth?

This book points out how the modern "sexually-liberated" ideals of our society and pop culture are scarcely different than the prudent, conservative ones from the past. Both ways of thinking, as Rachel Hills reveals, are just different means used by society to dictate how we have should have sex, whom we should have it with, how often we should be having it, etc. It is only when we realize that sex isn't some powerful force, either to be repressed or to be utilized, but just another thing that people do that we can actually be "free."

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Straight

  • The Surprisingly Short History of Heterosexuality
  • By: Hanne Blank
  • Narrated by: Fran Tunno
  • Length: 8 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 73

It's surprising that the term "heterosexuality" is less than 150 years old and that heterosexuality's history has never before been written, given how obsessed we are with it. In Straight, independent scholar Hanne Blank delves deep into the contemporary psyche as well as the historical record to chronicle the realm of heterosexual relations - a subject that is anything but straight and narrow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Title Says It All

  • By Susie on 03-14-13

Wonderful!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-16

Any additional comments?

Not what quite what I had expected, but fascinating, informative, and delightfully in-depth all the same.
Highly recommended, especially to those interested in the subjects of gender, sexuality, or mate selection.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Book of Tea

  • By: Okakura Kakuzo
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 4 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17

The Book of Tea by Okakura Kakuzo is a long essay linking the role of tea (teaism) to the aesthetic and cultural aspects of Japanese life. Addressed to a western audience, it was originally written in English and is one of the great English tea classics. Okakura had been taught at a young age to speak English and was proficient at communicating his thoughts to the Western mind. In his book, he discusses such topics as Zen and Taoism, but also the secular aspects of tea and Japanese life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Two hours of nothing but music at the end

  • By Paula on 07-09-15

Two hours of nothing but music at the end

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-15

This is a great book and the narrator does an excellent job, but the last one and a half to two hours of this book is nothing but music. It is nice music, though, and especially nice to listen to while drinking tea.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • 1Q84

  • By: Haruki Murakami, Jay Rubin (translator), Philip Gabriel (translator)
  • Narrated by: Allison Hiroto, Marc Vietor, Mark Boyett
  • Length: 46 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,276
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,490
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,465

The year is 1984 and the city is Tokyo.

A young woman named Aomame follows a taxi driver's enigmatic suggestion and begins to notice puzzling discrepancies in the world around her. She has entered, she realizes, a parallel existence, which she calls 1Q84 - "Q" is for "question mark". A world that bears a question....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I've never read a book quite like this one

  • By Joey on 04-23-12

Amazing; Well worth a credit

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-14

Would you consider the audio edition of 1Q84 to be better than the print version?

Probably. I rarely read longer books in any format other than audiobook. Not to mention that the narrators did such a fantastic job reading this that I highly doubt that I would have been moved by this book in the same way that I was while listening to it.

Who was your favorite character and why?

There are many likable, relatable, and admirable characters in the book. My favorite character, though, was probably either Tengo, for his hardworking, but gentle and easy-going personality, or Fuka-Eri, for her odd ways of speaking and thinking that I could personally relate to (to a certain extent).

  • Annabel

  • By: Kathleen Winter
  • Narrated by: Tandy Cronyn
  • Length: 11 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 74
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 69

Kathleen Winter’s poignant debut novel was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize. In it, Winter explores society’s views of gender identity through the eyes of a child born with male and female sex organs. At their doctor’s urging, the Blakes decide to raise their child as a boy, Wayne, giving him hormones to suppress his feminine physical traits. But after discovering the secret about his body, Wayne decides to stop taking his medication and lets his body develop naturally.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoughtful, relevant.

  • By Red River Blues Man on 09-05-16

A Very Well-Written Story That Sticks With You

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-13

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This book spoke about the main characters and their personalities & preferences in a way that you felt that you could relate to each of them. Even the most serious adults were painted with an almost child-like appreciation for the things that they found beauty in. Also, I love the idea of masculinity and femininity complementing one another (rather than compete against one another), which (I feel) the book presents as one of the most beautiful things of all.

Any additional comments?

There is an a serious case of assault within the book, so it may be triggering to those who have been attacked.