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  • New York 2140

  • By: Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Toren, Robin Miles, Peter Ganim, and others
  • Length: 22 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,250
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,149
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,151

The waters rose, submerging New York City. But the residents adapted, and it remained the bustling, vibrant metropolis it had always been. Though changed forever. Every street became a canal. Every skyscraper an island. Through the eyes of the varied inhabitants of one building, Kim Stanley Robinson shows us how one of our great cities will change with the rising tides. And how we, too, will change.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Complex, believable, nuanced, riveting

  • By Lois on 04-07-17

Visionary depiction of a potential future

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-18

I appreciated how the author seamlessly wove in descriptions and explanations of the underlying forces which drove the story. Ignoring climate change will have real consequences (e.g. rising sea level, rising inequality) for future generations, and this story explores one of those potential future.

  • Farmacology

  • Total Health from the Ground Up
  • By: Daphne Miller MD
  • Narrated by: Sarah Mollo-Christensen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 27

Can urban farms reduce neighborhood crime? These may not sound like typical questions for a family physician to consider, but in Farmacology, Daphne Miller, MD, ventures out of her medical office and travels to seven innovative family farms around the country on a quest to discover the hidden connections between how we care for our bodies and how we grow our food. Miller also seeks out the perspectives of noted biomedical scientists and artfully weaves in their research, along with stories from her own practice. Farmacology offers a profound new approach to healing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing book!

  • By Akod112 on 10-11-18

Eye-opening & engaging

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-18

Must read for anyone that is concerned with personal health and/or sustainability. I thoroughly enjoyed the author's hands-on and empowering stories that elucidate an optimistic path forward!

  • Synchronicity

  • The Art of Coincidence, Choice, and Unlocking Your Mind
  • By: Kirby Surprise
  • Narrated by: Ralph Morocco
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 63

The experience of meaningful coincidences is universal. They are reported by people of every culture, every belief system, and every time period. Synchronicity examines the evidence for the human influence on the meaningfulness of events, and the way the modern computational model of the mind predicts how we create meaning. It demonstrates that these events, based on the activity of the mind, are caused by the person who perceives them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining and Informative

  • By L Incerpi on 04-04-16

Intriguing concept w/ easy-to-follow examples

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-18

The right balance of science and anecdotal stories with appropriate disclaimers and suggestions to have fun with it.

  • The Age of Em

  • Work, Love, and Life When Robots Rule the Earth
  • By: Robin Hanson
  • Narrated by: Michael Butler Murray
  • Length: 15 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 65

Robots may one day rule the world, but what is a robot-ruled Earth like? Many think the first truly smart robots will be brain emulations, or ems. Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer, and you have a robot brain, but recognizably human. Train an em to do some job and copy it a million times; an army of workers is at your disposal. When they can be made cheaply, within perhaps a century, ems will displace humans in most jobs.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • An analytical book suited as a reference book

  • By Ageel Alassif on 03-30-17

Beginning is engaging and worth the time.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-18

Interesting thought experiment and I appreciated the author's careful consideration to justify the scenario he presented. I found the content slightly repetitive, or too "in-the-weeds," at times which lead to a longer duration that caused me to lose interest during the latter two-thirds of the book.