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Charles

Fort Worth, Texas USA
  • 12
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  • 91
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Lots of Little Errors

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-18

I like some of Winchester's books, but this felt shallow and poorly researched. And there are just so many better books on US history.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Nice and Short

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-29-18

It is not great or original, but Ryan was a law professor. But it is a nice short inspirational book that is an easy listen.

Lots of Useful Ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-16

Really, has lots of interesting ideas and TECHNIQUES. It is not just a ra-ra self help book.

The Tragic Romance of America and Marijuana

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-24-15

Would you try another book from Martin A. Lee and/or Nick Podehl?

Nick Podehl's performance was outstanding.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No.

Any additional comments?

In Martin Lee's telling the story is something like a tragic romance between two young lovers: the American people and sweet Marijuana constantly thwarted by cruel, uncaring parents - the Federal government.

It is incredibly one sided. I agree with the vast majority of Mr. Lee's assertions, but it is totally lacking any balance and in the final analysis I just can't trust it. Martin Lee apparently has never met anyone for whom pot was anything but an incredibly positive experience.

I believe pot is generally harmless for most people and causes less short term issues than booze, but that doesn't mean it there is no downside to pot use. I've seen it and, oddly, many of the strong pot advocates highlighted in the book, such as the founder of "High Times" Tom Forcade, die sad untimely deaths. I'm not saying they died because of their pot use, but Lee is so focused he never bothers to consider the question. I have no idea, but I am curious about him and the other untimely deaths.

Also, according to Mr. Lee no one who ever opposed pot ever did so except for the most venal, greedy, shortsighted reasons. And that would be OK, but he is so certain about his opinions. For instance, his description of Pancho Villa is like something from a Villista propaganda pamphlet, and he makes America in the 1940s and 1950s sound as bad or worse than Stalin's Soviet Union. It is just a matter of balance and Lee is so unbalanced that it makes me hesitant to endorse all of his conclusions.

I believe Mr. Lee would argue that the anti-marijuana crowd have had the floor for the last century and there is a lot of truth to that. Perhaps Mr. Lee lacks a certain confidence, because he could have overwhelmed nearly all of the serious, honest opposition to pot. He simply doesn't try, because he is so busy extolling the many virtues Miss Mary Jane.

All in all a solid book with a lot of useful information, but not a good balanced book that I can trust as the final word.

It's like reading Douglas Southhall Freeman's biographies of another Lee - Robert E. Lee. Even seventy years later those are great books, but they are hardly the last word on Lee because Freeman could not bear to ask hard questions about his idol General Lee. In this case, Martin Lee loves sweet Mary Jane. That keeps Smoke Signals from being the final word on marijuana.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

The Hidden Story of American History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-14

Any additional comments?

A very solid book about an issue that is often just beneath the surface of American history from the colonial period through today.

There are parts of the story that could have been highlighted more, particularly the issues around smuggling on the frontier in 19th century, but this helps tie together a lot of issues. If you've read a lot of American history this will help you connect the dots to among a huge number of issues.

It fills a lot of little gaps. Also, I liked that Andreas was careful not to oversell his point. Smuggling has often been important, but, except perhaps for the run up to the American revolution, rarely the most important single issue, and he admits that. However, smuggling has been a constant secondary issue in many historical developments and this book fills a lot of those gaps.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Every Service Member Should Read This Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-14

If you could sum up Drift in three words, what would they be?

Fair, Interesting, Important

Any additional comments?

Every member of the US military should read this book, because Maddow raises some interesting points about the rudderless, reactive nature of the US military. I was expecting something more classically liberal and I wasn't sure I would really like the book, but Maddow points out how challenging the current situation really is. Maddow point out that the US military is faced with a series of challenges from Islamic radicalism to Putin's revival of the Cold War to the a more aggressive China. She is also respectful and appreciative of the military while questioning a lot of the current doctrine that has developed since 9/11.

She doesn't hammer Bush or Obama, but points out that the US faces some difficult challenges and explains how difficult the challenges will be in the future. Anyone on the far right or left should read it and try to see that it is not an easy situation. And for service members and their families, who are most impacted by these strategic decisions, in particular should take the time to consider her arguments.

I consider myself a fighting liberal. I tend to be liberal, sometimes even progressive on domestic issues, but I am extremely concerned about many of the long term strategic problems faced by the United States and the rest of the Western world. Maddow heightened my concerns.

Also, her read was relaxed. I almost felt like I was having coffee with her and I believe even if you disagree with some of her analysis you will reconsider some of your assumptions.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Great Book: More Than Just Flying and Shooting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-10

Robin Olds' memoirs are more than simply a string of combat stories. I like that type book, but this is about two steps above the standard combat narrative.

Olds really bares his soul in "Fighter Pilot". He was an old man dying of cancer when he put the book together, and I believe, much like "Grant's Memoirs", his realization that this was his last statement about his life and legacy created an amazing story.

Olds is brutal in his assessment of fellow USAF officers. He goes after the USAF establishment with the same energy and passion that he went after ME-109s and MIG-21s. For me, this was a special treat, but he also gives credit to hundreds of men of all ranks that he served with. I really liked that he specifically complimented so many of his ground crew and staff officers by name, because those guys are almost always forgotten.

However, the personal elements are what really make this book special. Olds was admittedly not the best husband and he admits it. The story of his attempts to juggle his career with his family responsibilities are particularly touching. He was a great man, but also a deeply flawed man and I believe that's what makes the portrait so compelling.

I will admit there are lots of stories about the inner working of his thirty year rise to brigadier general, but I believe that reveals a side of the military that very few civilians ever even realizes exists. In fact, I hope "Fighter Pilot" becomes required reading for young officers. Military wives should read it too.

I thought I knew quite a bit about Olds before: A hard partying ace during World War II and a sort of modern day Nathan Forrest in an F-4 over North Vietnam. All of that is true, I believe Olds would really like the Forrest comparison, but he was really a much better LEADER and much better THINKER than I ever realized.

Highly recommended!

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

The Few, The Proud, The Australian!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-24-09

This is an outstanding history of the battle of Tobruk and Australia's role in World War II from the point of view of the digger, the average Aussie soldier. It is biased towards the Aussies, who at times Fitzsimmons paints as supermen, but Fitzsimmons admits his bias in the introduction. This is an ode to Australia's World War II soldiers and an entertaining listen, especially the slang. This book is a primer on Australian slang. I thought the narrator was great, but at times the Australian slang may be too much for some listeners.

"Tobruk" is a great book for serious World War II buffs, because frankly it goes into details about the Aussies that no general campaign history will ever cover. Fitzsimmons is tough on nearly every non-Australian leader other than Rommel, but his critical assessment of Churchill is particularly refreshing.

If you like "Tobruk" I would recommend "At All Costs" by Sam Moses about the siege of Malta too.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

Best Coverage of America's Bloodiest Day

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-18-08

Great book! Sears is knowledgable and fair, but it is really his ability to create an interesting narritive of an event most readers are already largely familiar with that makes "Landscape Turned Red" work so well. In large measure Sears succeeds, because he weaves in interesting quotations from such a wide variety of sources without distracting the story. He quotes Lee and McClellan, but also from unknown officers and men on both sides. Great work!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

A New New Deal

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-08

The "Forgotten Man" is a valuable piece of revisionist history, and it has both the strengths and weaknesses common among works that attempt to recast history through the eyes of later generations. The greatest strength of the work is that it recasts focus on the people that did and still do largely control the fate of the American economy: the wealthy. The book makes it clear that the resistance of the wealthiest Americans fatally weakened the New Deal. Shale explains in chapter after chapter how the rich moved their investments off shore, filed suit, and lobbied against the New Deal on the radio stations and in the newspapers they owned. However, she never interprets this resistance as a series of selfish un-patriotic choices that only prolonged the nation's agony. Instead, for her the villains are the New Dealers who were concerned about the plight of the average American. Shale lays out a laundry list of failed and misguided New Deal programs and never gives any credit to FDR or his administration or to the New Deal programs that worked. Instead, the book is a one sided polemic against the New Deal. Shale never accounts for the incredible popularity of FDR and the New Deal programs that her heroes worked so hard to sabotage. She fails to mention that the resistance to the New Deal in the South that really started after 1936 was largely driven by fears that the New Deal would weaken Jim Crow and she does not make the connection between some of the successful projects, such as the TVA and Intercoastal Waterway, with the eventual American victory in World War II. If you are really familiar with the New Deal the "Forgotten Man" might be worth a read for a different perspective, but this should not be your introduction to the subject. In fact, among most of the over eighty set FDR is still a hero and I believe that they would disagree with Shale's view of the New Deal as a disaster.

36 of 82 people found this review helpful