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  • Purgatorium

  • By: J. H. Carnathan
  • Narrated by: GraceWright Productions, Tristan Wright, Sarah Grace Wright, and others
  • Length: 13 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

A handsome, young urban professional awakens inside his cavernous high-rise apartment. He is an emotionless drone of a man content with his self-structured regiment and amazing wealth, and he is totally oblivious to his abnormal lifestyle. He keeps reliving the same day over and over, barely able to remember anything from the day before and unable to maintain mental order as he stumbles through his strange existence. One day, his routine is interrupted when seven strangers separately appear. Everything slams to a halt as they tell him that his physical body is in a coma and his consciousness is currently in a purgatory-like realm.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Thought-Provoking Page-Turner

  • By Becca Wilcox Flanagan on 09-05-18

Sound Effects Make This Un-listenable...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-18

I just couldn't finish this book and will return it. Production decided to include sound effects for the most inane things, which greatly distract from listening enjoyment. Watch alarm (many, many times)....check, screaming demons...check, Elevator doors...check, squeaky carousel...check, car engine...check, office equipment...check..., slamming books on table...check, lame piano music...check, etc, etc, etc. A well written book does not need sound effects. My own mind will "hear" what is written. Even worse, is reader reads the line, say..."Elevator doors slide open...", then he stops and waits for the sound effects (which are also too loud and not balanced/leveled with narrator), then reads again, then stops, waits for sound effects, etc. Storyline is hard to follow, as it is, so sound effects just made it worse.

As far as the storyline...very "Alice in Wonderland" meets "Willy Wonka" meets "Ground Hogs Day" if told by "Quentin Tarrentino". I'm not saying it's bad, necessarily, just a bit convoluted, scattered, and dreamlike. Again, I couldn't get through more than 5 chapters, because of the sound effects.

If you decide to listen to the Audible version, you'll have to pay attention. This is not a "read" you can listen to while doing chores or driving, etc.

I may buy the hard copy book and physically read this, as it may be good...who knows...

  • You Were Made for This

  • By: Michelle Sacks
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Willis, Jeremy Arthur, Caroline Slaughter
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 113
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 108

Merry, Sam, and Conor are the perfect family in the perfect place. Merry adores the domestic life: baking, gardening, caring for her infant son. Sam, formerly an academic, is pursuing a new career as a filmmaker. Sometimes they can hardly believe how lucky they are. What perfect new lives they've built. When Merry's childhood friend Frank visits their Swedish paradise, she immediately becomes part of the family. All their lives, Frank and Merry have been more like sisters than best friends. And that's why Frank soon sees the things others might miss.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • QUESTIONS.

  • By Kathleen Kolodge on 08-01-18

Miserable Story about Miserable People

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-18

This was a gut-wrenching, miserable story about very miserable people. Absolutely nothing about this story was worth reading. It was very well written, however I have to ask, "Why?". Was it a story of redemtion? No. Was it meant as an explanation of filicide? No. That Sweden (metaphor) is not the idealic life/place it appears on it's face? No.
Three sociopaths and a cop. That's it. Oh, and a pathetic, flawed neighbor and his sad wife.
I almost quit reading this book about every 30 minutes, but I kept waiting for something to happen, It never did, Just 8 hrs and 29mins of misery. Book left me depressed and angry. For no reason. If even one of the charactors was kind and worthy, it would have made for a much better story and review.
I'll be asking for a refund.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Sick Girl

  • By: Rachel Hargrove
  • Narrated by: Avery Reid
  • Length: 7 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 901
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 804
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 803

Twenty-five-year-old scrappy Aubrey is fed up with Tom, a married neurologist with two children. When he's not shoving their relationship on the back burner, he's canceling their dates. With a frightening health diagnosis looming over her shoulder, Aubrey concocts a desperate plan to have Tom forever. Kill the wife. Take her place. Befriending Tom's successful, kind wife comes easily to Aubrey. However, the closer they become, the more doubts Aubrey has about following through. Then, a shocking discovery changes everything....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not my typical genre but I loved it!

  • By Scott Stephens on 03-31-18

Many Missed opportunities...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-18

I enjoyed this story...kind of?? Decent plot and character development...kind of...

After listening and somewhat enjoying the story, overall, I felt as though the author missed so many opportunities to make this a really first rate thriller. It's odd...she set up a great outline and then just...mmmhhhhehhhh... I can't really go into detail, without giving away the plot.

The story is worth a credit. You won't be disappointed, just not as "thriller-ed" as you could have been.

  • Tangerine

  • By: Christine Mangan
  • Narrated by: Barrie Kreinik, Erin Mallon
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 745
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 691
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 698

The last person Alice Shipley expected to see since arriving in Tangier with her new husband was Lucy Mason. After the accident at Bennington, the two friends - once inseparable roommates - haven't spoken in over a year. Lucy - always fearless and independent - helps Alice emerge from her flat and explore the country. But soon a familiar feeling starts to overtake Alice - she feels controlled and stifled by Lucy at every turn. Then Alice's husband, John, goes missing, and Alice starts to question everything around her.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Goes downhill

  • By Karen on 03-31-18

Lesbian Stalker "Thiller?"...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-18

Not that there's anything wrong with Lesbian Stalker Thrillers or lesbians, however, as a hetero woman, it just wasn't doing it for me:) I just thought I would mention the subject matter for those who may feel the same.

As for the story, itself... I seriously could have gotten into the lesbian stalker angle, however this just was not a well written novel...it just fell very flat. No thrill at all. You just kept listening...hoping it would all come together, but it never did. Characters were introduced and just faded away...not even "red herring" worthy.

The Lucy and Alice characters and their relationship were never fully developed, so you really don't care at all for them or their story, which is so important in this type of psychological "thriller". To top it off, the ending was a major dissappointment.

The outline of this story had promise, but it just did not deliver. I will be requestinfg a refund of a credit.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Secret Lives Super Boxset

  • By: Roger Hayden, Alexandira Clarke, James Hunt
  • Narrated by: Ramona Master, Tia Rider Sorensen, Michaela Drew
  • Length: 42 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 29

Victoria Owens's life takes a sudden turn after she receives an unexpected chain letter about her upcoming high school reunion. She's quick to dismiss the letter and focus instead on her busy day, amidst a preoccupied husband and eleven year-old-daughter. But the letter is only the beginning of a series of anonymous gifts, each more bizarre than the next, which shed light on a past long forgotten.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Soooooooo Cliche. Elementary Writing.

  • By Rose on 11-01-17

Soooooooo Cliche. Elementary Writing.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-17

Reads as though written by a JR High student. Elementary, at best, writing style. Cliche characters. Dialog is banaI and uninspired. I can barely write this review, as I have lost IQ points from listening to this. No kidding.

I only made it through The Secret Letter, so don't know if the rest of the set is any good.

The poor narration, by Ramona Master, only made this worse. She sounded like a cross between Fargo and a Valley Girl. Very whiny tone.

I truly dislike writing such a negative review, but I dislike more wasting a credit.

This wasn't even a good beach or cleaning-the-house read.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Sleeping Beauties

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King, Owen King
  • Narrated by: Marin Ireland
  • Length: 25 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,967
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,268
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,228

In a future so real and near it might be now, something happens when women go to sleep: They become shrouded in a cocoon-like gauze. If they are awakened, if the gauze wrapping their bodies is disturbed or violated, the women become feral and spectacularly violent; and while they sleep they go to another place.... The men of our world are abandoned, left to their increasingly primal devices. One woman, however, the mysterious Evie, is immune to the blessing or curse of the sleeping disease.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • long and unbearable

  • By candy on 11-01-18

Capitalizing on Current Climate of Victimhood...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-17

I'll sum up the story for you in less than 24 hours.

• All White men are uncivilized, misogynistic, ignorant, imbeciles.
• Police are racist, undiciplined murderers.
• Guns are bad.
• Women are hapless victims, living life under the heels of men.
• You can't trust snakes.

That's the story. The Kings capitalizing on the current social hysteria.

Could have been a good story, if not for the preaching and guilt trips.

Marin Ireland's narration was spot on and wonderful.




28 of 32 people found this review helpful

  • When You Disappeared

  • By: John Marrs
  • Narrated by: Simon Mattacks, Elizabeth Knowelden
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 666
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 563
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 564

All she wanted was the truth, but she'll wish she never found out. When Catherine wakes up alone one morning, she thinks her husband has gone for a run before work. But Simon never makes it to the office. His running shoes are by the front door. Nothing is missing - except him.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • This novel has issues!

  • By Wayne on 09-12-17

Why? Totally Useless Story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-21-17

I wanted to like this book, however it just fell flat... I seriously didn't care for any of the characters or the plot, for that matter. No purpose to the story. I came away with nothing.
Wasted credit for sure. Narration was good enough.

  • My Husband's Wife

  • A Novel
  • By: Jane Corry
  • Narrated by: Rosalyn Landor
  • Length: 13 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,991
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5,449
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,447

For fans of Big Little Lies and The Couple Next Door comes an addictive psychological thriller that's already an international sensation. When young lawyer Lily marries Ed, she's determined to make a fresh start. To leave the secrets of the past behind. But then she takes on her first murder case and meets Joe. A convicted murderer whom Lily is strangely drawn to. For whom she will soon be willing to risk almost anything.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • weak

  • By Jen Irish on 09-16-17

Ugh! What a Drab, Convoluted Story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-17

This could have been a good book, however it just was so blah..........................
You don't care at all about any of the characters, as they are all just miserable people...all of them...ok, wait, maybe one guy...but, i'm sure, if the book dragged out any longer, the author would have found a way to make him miserable, too...

The storyline starts out boring, but you get a hint it might pick up, so you invest a bit more time, then it becomes convoluted And boring, then just goes completely wonky at the end...as if Columbo meets the gal from Murder She Wrote, who happens to marry Mr. Watson (From Holmes), and they all meet up for lunch to write the ending to this story...blind folded...

I think a reviwer used a Russian Nesting Doll as metaphor for how this story played out...they nailed it. I'd add that it would be a very large Russian Nesting Doll with about 27 doll layers.

The narrator is just OK. Not really her fault, just miss cast. She sounds too old for the parts and a bit lifeless.

Overall, I can't reccomend spending a credit on this.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Telomere Effect

  • A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer
  • By: Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, Dr. Elissa Epel
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 341
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 301
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 298

Have you wondered why some 60-year-olds look and feel like 40-year-olds and why some 40-year-olds look and feel like 60-year-olds? While many factors contribute to aging and illness, Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn discovered a biological indicator called telomerase, the enzyme that replenishes telomeres, which protect our genetic heritage. Dr. Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel's research shows that the length and health of one's telomeres are a biological underpinning of the long-hypothesized mind-body connection.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I expected so much more

  • By Innate on 01-28-17

Just Not Enough Hard Information

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-17

I was looking forward to reading this book, as I have heard great things regarding telomere reseach. Unfortunately, as other reviewers have noted, this book is very low on actual hard facts. It reads like an infomercial for a Telomere product...stating that shortening telomeres are the cause of this or that, but not really getting into what you can do about it.
They do say get more exercise, eat well, and reduce stress. Uh, OK...now what?
Telomeres and the aging process is a facinating topic, however not much here in this book.

29 of 30 people found this review helpful

  • The Diary of a Rapist

  • By: Evan S. Connell
  • Narrated by: Andrew Karst
  • Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 5

The 1960s: news of riots, war, unheard-of behavior, and rampant crime crowds the papers and the airwaves. Spurned by his wife at home and by superiors at work, Earl Summerfield hunkers down in his cramped San Francisco apartment and keeps a diary that is a scratched record of a world going to pieces. The words he overhears, the words he wants to say, swim in his head, turning into fantasies of ambition, love, and retribution. He is sorry for himself. He is angry at everyone.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding Performance

  • By Anonymous User on 02-12-18

One Man Show... Exceptional Narration...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-16

No one has yet to write a review for this story on Audible, so thought I would help out.

This, for me, is a difficult book to review, so I will leave that to someone else, below, who did so brilliantly, in my opinion (see below review from Amazon).

What I haven't seen reviewed is the narration. Andrew Karst did an amazing job with this difficult read. As this was a one man show, all you had to listen to was "Earl Summerfield". Andrew Karst became Earl... Perfect voice for the character and handled the varied emotions spot on. I look forward to hearing more of his work, as it looks as though this may be his first?? If so, I hope he contributes more.

Here is the brilliant review, By Steven Reynoldson, copied from Amazon:

Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase

Earl Summerfield, 26, feckless junior clerk at the State Unemployment Bureau, miserably married to the loveless Bianca, 33, keeps a diary for one year. It becomes a record of marital hatred, the paranoia and pathetic rivalries of office life, and, increasingly, a record of violent crime - the rapes, robberies, senseless murders and gas chamber executions reported in the daily news.

Earl's apparent disgust and dismay at the crime wave alternates with violent sexual fantasies of his own. Fleeing Bianca and his apartment some nights, he begins sneaking into other people's houses. When he becomes fixated with the local beauty queen, Mara St Johns, it's only a matter of time before Earl's fantasies become reality. Or do they?...

I imagine many readers flee from this novel - even from the title - assuming it's some kind of exploitative or voyeuristic pornography. Far from it. It is relentlessly voyeuristic, but the object of that gaze is Earl's mind. This is a tremendously engaging novel of psychological realism, and what gives it that vivid quality is that Earl is as inconsistent as any real person. He loves himself, he's filled with self-loathing. He deserves to be promoted, he's an idiot for dreaming of it. One day he despises work, the next he can't wait to go in. One night he revels in personal insights and dreams of self-transformation, making life-changing decisions which are instantly reversed or forgotten by the next.

He's a man unravelling; caught in the trap of middle-class existence which fuels his dreams without giving him any real hope of achieving them; caught, too, between desire and the Puritan legacy for which the circuit breaker is a violent rejection and punishment of sex.

What's most compelling about Earl's diary is that the more deranged, anti-social and evangelical he becomes, the more consistent are his writing and behaviour. In the end, he lives up to his rhetoric.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful