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Demetria

san luis obispo, CA, United States
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 29
  • helpful votes
  • 32
  • ratings
  • The 39 Clues, Book 10

  • Into the Gauntlet
  • By: Margaret Peterson Haddix
  • Narrated by: David Pittu
  • Length: 7 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 458
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 333
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 339

Once Amy and Dan Cahill's choice was simple - take a million dollars or the first of 39 Clues that lead to the source of unimaginable power. Now it's clear that the hunt for Clues is bigger than anything that Amy and Dan could ever have imagined.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Series of Books

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-18-10

great family read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-15

great series to listen to as a family! everyone enjoyed it including the parents. great history throughout the series.

  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle

  • By: Beverly Cleary
  • Narrated by: B. D. Wong
  • Length: 2 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 690
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 525
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 524

Ralph is not like the other mice at the Mountain View Inn. He is always looking for adventure. It is Ralph's lucky day when a young guest named Keith arrives with a shiny miniature motorcycle. Right away, Ralph knows that the motorcycle is special - and made to be ridden by an adventurous mouse. And once a mouse can ride a motorcycle...almost anything can happen!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sensitive five year old loves it!

  • By Demetria on 11-29-11

Sensitive five year old loves it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-11

We have a hard time finding books for my five year old who does not like anything with conflict or emotional distress between the characters. Beverly Clearly writes well and handles conflict and emotional distress in a way that teaches, but isn't scary. Everyone in the family enjoyed this listen....the age ranges of the kids span 10 years, so finding a book that everyone enjoys can be difficult. I would recommend this book for anyone with kids. It probably helps that I remember reading and enjoying this book as a child.

28 of 30 people found this review helpful

  • Extraordinary, Ordinary People

  • A Memoir of Family
  • By: Condoleezza Rice
  • Narrated by: Condoleezza Rice
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 355
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 254
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 252

This is the story of Condoleezza Rice that has never been told, not that of an ultra-accomplished world leader, but of a little girl - and a young woman - trying to find her place in a sometimes hostile world, and of two exceptional parents, and an extended family and community, that made all the difference.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous!

  • By Steve on 03-03-11

Contrasts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-11

I love Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family, by Condoleezza Rice, because it speaks to me. My parents grew up in the South, but my family has none of the experiences that most people think of when they think of the southern living in the 50s. There are three reasons for this:

1. My grandparents were educated .My grandmother was a midwife who worked in the local community. I don’t know what my grandfather did for a living but I know he worked outside of the home.

2. My grandparents owned their land. They farmed and often employed people in the community to help in the fields.
3. My grandparents raised their children away from racism and segregation. They had a big family so they are at home and a avoided issues like “white only” restrooms when raising their kids. My mother and her siblings went to the private family school so there was no segregation on that front either. My grandparents had their own car so there was never an occasion to sit at the back of the bus.

This means that my mom grew up in middle to upper middle class home. That is a stark contrast from what most people think of when they think of the deep south in the 1950s. The standard portrayal usually involves uneducated black people in the service community. People tend to ignore the stories of people who do not fit that image. The Help is an example of this type of “love to adore the servant black character” fiction and it is disgusting when a book like that gets such rave reviews for reinforcing negative stereotypes by having boring characters filling roles that we have seen over and over again. I often wonder if the people who give books like this great review are nursing some desire to return to a world like that.
Reading Condi’s book felt like coming home. It was the first time that I read a book about a black family in the south that resonated with me. Her stories are similar to my stories. I enjoyed reading about her journey because it was more similar to my journey

1 of 1 people found this review helpful