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Keenan North

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 20
  • ratings
  • The Kingdom

  • Arabia & The House of Sa'ud
  • By: Robert Lacey
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 22 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 70
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70

The Kingdom is the story of a country - a country of astonishing contrasts, where routine computer printouts open with the words “In the name of God,” where men who grew up in goat-hair tents now dominate the money markets of the world, and where murderers and adulterers are publicly executed in the street. By its own reckoning, this country is just entering the 15th century. The Kingdom is also the story of a family - a family that has fought its way from poverty and obscurity into wealth and power.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A solid effort

  • By Muttering Beduwen on 10-10-12

Some recording issues

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-18

Was an interesting book, but at times the recording quality was poor. Overall, still worth listening to if you’re interested in learning about Saudi Arabia.

  • Skin in the Game

  • Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,150
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,869
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,851

In his most provocative and practical book yet, one of the foremost thinkers of our time redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept one's own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliance smothered by Condescension and Petty Squabbling

  • By Jeremy on 03-11-18

Pretty much what you expect

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-18

Taleb offers some very interesting ideas and builds off of his previous books. If you don’t mind the narcissistic humor there is a lot of very useful information that might drive you to critically examine your own conventional thinking at a collective scale.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Dream of Reason

  • A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance
  • By: Anthony Gottlieb
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 18 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 815
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 290
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 290

In this landmark new study of Western thought, Anthony Gottlieb looks afresh at the writings of the great thinkers, questions much of conventional wisdom, and explains his findings with unbridled brilliance and clarity. After finishing The Dream of Reason, listeners will be graced with a fresh appreciation of the philosophical quest, its entertaining and bizarre byways, and its influence on every aspect of life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An in depth read.

  • By Leigh A on 11-05-03

Great Book - A few recording issues

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-18

This is a very concise and well written survey written for the non-philosopher. A couple times in the recording the recordings for switching disks were left in, but overall reading was solid.

  • Lost Enlightenment

  • Central Asia's Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane
  • By: S. Frederick Starr
  • Narrated by: Kevin Stillwell
  • Length: 25 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 265
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 232
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 232

Lost Enlightenment recounts how, between the years 800 and 1200, Central Asia led the world in trade and economic development, the size and sophistication of its cities, the refinement of its arts, and, above all, in the advancement of knowledge in many fields. Central Asians achieved signal breakthroughs in astronomy, mathematics, geology, medicine, chemistry, music, social science, philosophy, and theology, among other subjects.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a wonderful find!

  • By Julia on 11-10-13

A very good overview

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-17

Detailed information, but not so thorough that newcomers to Medieval Central Asia won’t be able to pick it up. Very well written, and narration is on point. Overall, was very impressed with this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful