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Jack Doe

  • 8
  • reviews
  • 60
  • helpful votes
  • 181
  • ratings
  • That Man

  • An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • By: Robert H. Jackson, John Q. Barrett (editor), William E. Leuchtenberg (foreward)
  • Narrated by: Mark Moseley
  • Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

Robert H. Jackson was one of the giants of the Roosevelt era: an Attorney General, a still revered Supreme Court Justice and, not least important, one of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's close friends and advisers. His intimate memoir of FDR, written in the early 1950s before Jackson's untimely death, has remained unpublished for fifty years. Here is that newly discovered memoir.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great final chapter

  • By Jack Doe on 07-20-18

Great final chapter

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-18

Jackson’s address to the DOJ upon FDR’s death is eloquent and moving. Very good book overall especially (for me) the chapter relating his journal entries on a fishing trip they took.

  • The Code of the Woosters

  • Jeeves to the Rescue
  • By: P. G. Wodehouse
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cecil
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 767
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 766

Witty Wodehouses�s best-loved creation is the master-servant team of Bertie Wooster, the charming nitwit, and Jeeves, his effortlessly superior valet and protector. Newsweek says "they are at their best in The Code of the Woosters." Newsweek says "they are at their best in The Code of the Woosters."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Wodehouse narrator

  • By Philip on 03-09-05

One of the best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-16

"The Code of the Woosters" is one of the best of the Jeeves and Wooster series, though of course they're all wonderful. There are whole chapters that have you crying with laughter. The narrator is perfect. He does a variety of characters absolutely flawlessly.

  • The Inimitable Jeeves

  • By: P. G. Wodehouse
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cecil
  • Length: 6 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 601
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 440
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 436

Bertie Wooster is in trouble again as his lovesick pal, Bingo Little, falls in love with every girl he lays eyes on. The real problem starts when Bingo decides to marry one of the girls, and he enlists Bertie's help. Luckily for Bertie, Jeeves once again comes to the rescue!

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • laugh out loud

  • By Scott on 12-28-05

Great story, great narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-16

Almost every chapter has you laughing out loud, and Jonathan Cecil channels Bertie. Highest quality!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Brothers Karamazov [Naxos AudioBooks Edition]

  • By: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Constance Garnett - translator
  • Narrated by: Constantine Gregory
  • Length: 37 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,599
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,418
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,419

Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a titanic figure among the world's great authors, and The Brothers Karamazov is often hailed as his finest novel. A masterpiece on many levels, it transcends the boundaries of a gripping murder mystery to become a moving account of the battle between love and hate, faith and despair, compassion and cruelty, good and evil.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Spiritual and Philosophical Tour-de-Force

  • By Rich on 02-27-16

Disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-16

When I read this book ~30 years ago, I thought it was the finest novel ever written (although I thought that about many books I'd just finished, but seriously, this one stood above all others). Upon listening to it again, however, I found it tedious. The reason is it spends a lot of time pondering the fate of the soul. The non-believer I've become in the interim makes the exercise pointless. I'd like to think I'm still idealistic, but I'm not nearly as impressionable as I was back in the day. There's still lots of wisdom and insight about human existence in this book, of course, but it repeatedly is overwhelmed by less relevant philosophizing about what is at best speculative, and it does so at excruciating length and in minute detail. It was more than I could take. On the other hand, I just reread (or rather listened to) War and Peace too (another book I thought was the best ever when I finished it once upon a time), and it was wonderful. If you're in the mood for a massive Russian novel, that one doesn't disappoint.

Founding Brothers Part 2 audiobook cover art
  • Founding Brothers Part 2

  • The Revolutionary Generation
  • By: Joseph J. Ellis
  • Narrated by: Nelson Runger
  • Length: 6 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 323
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1

A New York Times best seller, Founding Brothers is an engrossing work of nonfiction from National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winner Joseph J. Ellis. It is a book that uncovers the substance behind many of our most cherished historical tales. Here are six fascinating, well-researched chapters involving such icons as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Band of Brothers

  • By Jack Doe on 02-15-15

Band of Brothers

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-15

I give this book four stars. It's solid and interesting. The narration is a tad pompous and the material seems a bit stretched in some places though, particularly the first and second to last chapters. But the final chapter, which is actually an interview with the author, is worth the price of the book. It's too bad he didn't narrate his own book, because he's got insight and passion and knows how to pronounce all the words he uses.

  • Theodore Rex Part 3

  • By: Edmund Morris
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Marosz
  • Length: 8 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    0 out of 5 stars 0

The most eagerly awaited presidential biography in years, Theodore Rex tells the story of President Theodore Roosevelt in real time, reflecting the world as "TR" saw it. Full of cinematic detail, Theodore Rex moves with the exhilarating pace of a novel, yet it rides on a granite base of scholarship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Needs an audio editor

  • By Jack Doe on 02-06-15

Needs an audio editor

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-15

The history is masterful and the narration is fine. However, the editing of the narration is poor. At least once a chapter the narrator repeats an entire paragraph, because apparently the splicing of audio segments was done by a drunk. It was annoying, but other than that I really enjoyed this book.

  • The Sixth Extinction

  • An Unnatural History
  • By: Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Narrated by: Anne Twomey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,563
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,172

A major audiobook about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes. Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on Earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lifts you out of the ordinary

  • By Regina on 04-28-14

Be annoyed at what she says, not how she says it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-14

I'm just commenting on the narration here, because it seems the consensus is that this is a great book and I agree. All aspects of it . Some listeners seem to have let the narrator's delivery ruin their experience with this title though. She's soft-spoken, and maybe from the influence of other listeners' reviews, I was thinking at first that I didn't like it either, that the effect was more suited to a storybook. But I kept listening, and after a while I realized it was fine. Really, just let it go, let the woman speak. She enunciates clearly and on an even keel, and I ended up appreciating everything about the book (well, considering the subject matter, almost everything). I just finished a book where the narrator kept saying "climactic" when they meant "climatic," and vice versa. Now *that* was annoying. If you make up your mind her delivery is going to bother you, then it will, but it doesn't have to. Try to just enjoy this book and I think you will.

59 of 63 people found this review helpful

  • Sex at Dawn

  • How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships
  • By: Christopher Ryan, Cacilda Jetha
  • Narrated by: Allyson Johnson, Jonathan Davis, Christopher Ryan (Preface)
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,547
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,502
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,486

Since Darwin's day, we've been told that sexual monogamy comes naturally to our species. Mainstream science - as well as religious and cultural institutions - has maintained that men and women evolved in families in which a man's possessions and protection were exchanged for a woman's fertility and fidelity. But this narrative is collapsing....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Strawmen and Ad Hominems

  • By Carolyn on 09-18-12

Best popular science book yet

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-17-13

Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships
by Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha

The top review on the book's description page gives it two stars because it is "too focused on academic infighting." This isn't the case at all. The book debunks lots of unexamined assumptions, both in academia and among the general public, but it does so in an informative, entertaining, and crucially necessary way. Most people "know" that humans are "naturally" monogamous and every society has always been based on monogamy. Except they aren't, and they haven't been. So if the authors spend some time proving that what we (both the scientific researchers and ordinary people) think we know isn't true, it's far from tedious or "inside baseball" that ordinary people don't care about. It's fascinating, and well argued. I've been semi-obsessed with human evolution for the past few years, and the authors have explained who we are and how we've become this way more in this one book than practically all the rest I've read put together. I wish they'd get busy and write a lot more books! :-)

This book makes more sense of the mountains of evidence right in front of our eyes about human sexuality and why we feel and act the ways we do about it than anything I've encountered. And it's delivered in very accessible style, with wit, insight, and wisdom. The readers of the audio book do a terrific job as well. (Jonathan Davis reads the epigraphs etc, and Allyson Johnson handles the narration with great skill.) I can't recommend this book highly enough; it's the best I've read in years on this or any other subject.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful