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TheBookie

Michigan
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 666
  • helpful votes
  • 10
  • ratings
  • The Lessons of History

  • By: Will, Ariel Durant
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,653
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,325
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,310

The authors devoted five decades to the study of world history and philosophy, culminating in the masterful 11-volume Story of Civilization. In this compact summation of their work, Will and Ariel Durant share the vital and profound lessons of our collective past. Their perspective, gained after a lifetime of thinking and writing about the history of humankind, is an invaluable resource for us today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is a must for every Educated Person

  • By BradleyBurr on 10-29-07

Astonishing...READ THIS BOOK!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-19

Will and Ariel Durant's books have graced my shelves all my life, admittedly collecting dust most of the time, until I needed some specific reference information. Regardless, I knew I could trust them to present historical information and context better than any website or encyclopedia.

So when I saw this short book, I hesitated perhaps thirty seconds - a land speed record for a girl who tends to vacillate over everything. But I love history. I want to know everything that happened, everything we know. Which, of course, is impossible.

However, if any one (or two) people knew close to everything about human history, it would have been the Durants. But then to find a book about the philosophy of history, the trends spanning thousands of years, the cycles and instincts that dominate an allegedly civilized animal, the directions we always go when certain stimuli is applied...

This book is something of a miracle - the perfect combination of knowledge and wisdom. An exceedingly rare thing indeed.

Then too, the recordings of Will and Ariel in interviews further elucudating their points... Brilliant and so endearing! For that reason I dare say this Audible edition is the best version of this book! And often I believe points can be lost in listening to complex and often abstract ideas. Not here. Not at all.

Accessible, intelligent, humble, and CRITICAL to the enduring success of our modern civilization, this book may be the MOST IMPORTANT BOOK I have EVER READ. And I have read some amazing works.

So read this. Listen. Don't hesitate. Read it again, share it with...everybody. Require it in schools. Base government decisions on its guidance. I am serious. No exaggeration. The future of our world may well depend on grasping and initiating the ideas so generously shared by the Durants. Their contribution to their world can not be overstated.

  • The Wall Street Journal Digest

  • By: The Wall Street Journal
  • Narrated by: Keith Sellon-Wright
  • Length: 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 811
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 641
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 615

Here's a creative way to make the best use of your morning commute: listen to The Wall Street Journal.  

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Changed review

  • By Hank on 05-05-17

Disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-19

Initially, I was elated to find a brief news report by such a highly regarded publication as WSJ available with Audible membership for no extra cost. And I didn't hesitate for a second to add and listen to it.

I am, however, deeply disappointed in the content provided, at least that of the March 21, 2019 program. While WSJ covered several hot-button issues like immigration and proposed changes to the electoral college in the US, it spent an inordinate amount of time covering, not so much the New Zealand terrorism attack, but the shooter himself.

Let me be clear that I am strongly biased on this topic as you may notice below, but I believe my stance is not without merit.

When I was a journalism student, longer ago than I'd like to admit, I was taught that journalists never covered a suicide in depth. It was a question of ethics in journalism. An obituary was written, as it would be for anyone else, but the suicide aspect was never mentioned at all -- as it was thought to promote, or at least implant, the idea in other's heads. It gave validation to suicide ideation in people's minds. It gave attention to the person considering the act, and to an unstable mind, such attention could be appealing as I kind of glorification. Not only did it imply consent to such an act, it could even inadvertently encourage someone else who desired such notoriety to mimic. Journalists need a sense of ethics in reporting to the public: a responsibility for truth, but also for restraint.

I feel it is the same with these mass shooters. In our insatiable curiosity and hunger for the sensational, we as humans tend to want to scrutinize the anomolous individual, the criminal, the psychopath, and find the differences in them from us. Its in our nature. Its also in our nature to judge those people with celebrity in whatever ways our own ethics -- or the ethics presented by media as popular opinion -- deem.

For that reason, I stongly believe that our "news" reporters have a responsibilty to the public to present relevant, unbiased stories. However, that is not what I found in the first Audible story that I heard from WSJ. Yes, they presented some important news, and while they still do better than many news outlets, IMHO, as far as unbiased reporting goes, the simple fact that they delved into every detail of the Christchurch gunman's life, from everywhere he traveled to whether he left his kitchen clean before he made the choices he made, proves their bias. They were presenting news not as information but as thinly veiled sensationalism, a spectacle to engage a desensitized public. And if that behavior didn't have such high potential for inciting another individual with deranged thinking into violence for the sake of notoriety, then it wouldn't be so concerning.

The thing is, they know better. Research shows that these incidents often follow closely on the heels of another. Words have power. The media, be it presented as fiction or nonfiction, has power. Journalists have power, whether they admit it or not. When they choose the angle of a story: details of a gunman's life, one-sided voices for gun-control, and so on, they can direct public opinion in ways I believe are highly unethical. I realize most other news agencies do the same, or even worse, but that doesn't make it any more acceptable.

So yes, while the story of the gunman's every move could be viewed as thorough reporting, it could also be seen as sensationalism seeking ratings. And that is so very disappointing to me. I honestly expected WSJ to rise above.

Will I continue to listen to WSJ's Audible presentations? For now, yes. Do I trust them as a fair, unbiased, and respectable journalistic institution? Not so much anymore.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Hero with a Thousand Faces

  • By: Joseph Campbell
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, John Lee, Susan Denaker
  • Length: 14 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,864
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,681
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,668

Since its release in 1949, The Hero with a Thousand Faces has influenced millions of readers by combining the insights of modern psychology with Joseph Campbell's revolutionary understanding of comparative mythology. In this book, Campbell outlines the Hero's Journey, a universal motif of adventure and transformation that runs through virtually all of the world's mythic traditions. He also explores the Cosmogonic Cycle, the mythic pattern of world creation and destruction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very good if hungry for more Campbell

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-03-16

Incredibly insightful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-19

For years this book has been in my reading queue so I was happy to find an Audible version to make it a bit more accessible.

The narrator is my only, rather minor, issue with this version. He is articulate and able to pronounce words and names that I have always fumbled with, making it easier to listen. But he also speaks slowly and without a lot of inflection. At times, it is too easy to tune him out as he drones a bit, making me have to relisten to sections sometimes.

The other narrators confused me too, until I referenced the hard copy and realized they are reading the footnotes and other secondary texts. It helps once you have that context. I misunderstood their roles early on.

That said, Joseph Campbell truly did write a masterpiece on world mythology and humanity. It is dense at times, but the insights are worth having to re-listen to sections. I would recommend having a hard copy available, as this isn't the easiest book to fully grasp just by listening. In fact, I will be listening to it again soon, now that I have a better understanding of the larger picture Campbell was painting.

I won't get into details you can find elsewhere, but will say, if you are a student of mythology, sociology, psychology, a writer, an artist, or just the curious sort, this book should be one of the first you pick up. You will never read or hear a story quite the same again.

  • Scale

  • The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life, in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
  • By: Geoffrey West
  • Narrated by: Bruce Mann
  • Length: 19 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 669
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 664

Visionary physicist Geoffrey West is a pioneer in the field of complexity science, the science of emergent systems and networks. The term complexity can be misleading, however, because what makes West's discoveries so beautiful is that he has found an underlying simplicity that unites the seemingly complex and diverse phenomena of living systems, including our bodies, our cities, and our businesses.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating and clear enough for a lib arts major

  • By kwdayboise (Kim Day) on 05-29-17
  • Scale
  • The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life, in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
  • By: Geoffrey West
  • Narrated by: Bruce Mann

DNF

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

Fascinating topic that I am still curious about, but I just don't have the patience for this particular narrative/narrator. The narrator is articulate and enunciates carefully, but his tone felt... Well, snobbish and a bit patronizing to me. Mix that with a fairly dry read on universal scaling laws and you have what felt like a droll university prof droning on in front of a blackboard full of equations that you can't see.

I imagine that this is a phenomenal read on paper, or at least, informative. On Audible? It's just dry. I have to rewind to relisten to some parts simply because they didn't process. Whether it's the scientific jargon on the work, the narraror's tone, or just my brain trying to multitask while listening to fairly detailed information, I don't know. But I finally gave up. When I realized I really needed to just start over to truly grasp what the author is trying to communicate, or read the hard copy, I decided to just let this one go.

I rated the book with a neutral 3 for these reasons. My review is so subjective that I don't want to hurt the book's rating too much. Again, this isn't a "bad" book, but I can't say it's good either. At least for me, it was just too dry and the narrator actually irritated me enough that I was distracted from content. That said... To each their own. You may love it. Just listen to a sample first and ask yourself if you can listen to 19 hours of it.

  • The Power of Vulnerability

  • Teachings of Authenticity, Connection, and Courage
  • By: Brené Brown PhD
  • Narrated by: Brené Brown
  • Length: 6 hrs and 30 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 25,679
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,854
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 22,591

On The Power of Vulnerability, Dr. Brown offers an invitation and a promise - that when we dare to drop the armor that protects us from feeling vulnerable, we open ourselves to the experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives. Here she dispels the cultural myth that vulnerability is weakness and reveals that it is, in truth, our most accurate measure of courage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The audio makes all the difference.

  • By Sadie on 09-14-13

So important...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-18

Thanks, Brené for a fantastic and thought-provoking performance. Some of these things sounded so much like me when I was younger, before I cared so much about conforming -- that person that didn't fit in, but didn't feel compelled to fake it either. I smothered that version of me after enough social fails, rejections, and humiliations. And I'm going to be trying to breathe her back to life, bit by bit, because I liked that me a whole lot better than the one trying so hard to fit in and be perfect. I suspect a lot of other people feel the same way. We've lost some things in our culture and just thrown other things away as unimportant.

After listening to this, I don't even feel comfortable critiqueing this because so much of it included very personal and, yes, vulnerable anecdotes of Brené's, as well as her well researched work on shame, fear, and vulnerability. She goes places very few people are willing to even acknowledge, let alone talk about, with courage and character that is admirable and informative. Very rarely have I read a book that does not "make me think", but this one makes you really dig deep into your memory, experience, weaknesses, strengths, relationships, work, and play, and really consider how authentic you are being. How real are you being? Are you aiming to come off as the perfect mother, the perfect boss, the perfect whatever? Or are you really being and doing what you believe is right for you? How about for your kids? This "book" (which is actually a seminar) makes you gauge how courageous you really are. But it also gives you some tools to be more like the person you really want to be. It's forgiving when you screw up. It's supportive for the mistakes you will inevitably make, but mostly, it's encouraging. It's not too late to work on these aspects of your life and relationships. This is not a fixed set of behavioral prescriptions. She doesn't tell you, "say this. Don't say that"... Okay, maybe sometimes she does the latter, but not the way many self-help style authors do. Brené's approach is down to earth, endearingly flawed and completely accessible, and I would literally recommend this book to EVERYONE. It's that important for us to think about. I think this is the sort of topic that could change the world of enough people tried to integrate it into their lives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane

  • A Novel
  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,897
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,585
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,562

A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. He is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock. Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie - magical, comforting, wise beyond her years - promised to protect him, no matter what.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gaiman delivers an intimate masterpiece

  • By Talia on 08-07-13

Phenomenal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-18

My husband and I listened to this book as we canned honeyed peaches and spiced preserves. Who'd have thought it would be such a curiously appropriate story for such an activity? We listened to the whole thing in one go (which is definitely the best way if you have the time) and I don't know if we've ever been so quiet in one another's presence.

The story is, as per usual Neil Gaiman, strange and a bit meandering, never too clear and certainly never direct, but lovely and a little melancholy, the way fuzzy memories can be. It inspired a touch of nostalgia in me that I rarely experience in the fantasy genre. The boy, whose name I honestly don't think Neil ever gave, who narrated the story, experiences such a plethora of incongruent and otherworldly occurrences, his reality changed drastically from that of a mundane 7 year old in the country meeting a kind, older girl after a tragedy occurs in his life. She helps him, but he makes a grave, if very simple, mistake. And yet, as his world is twisted all askew by her family and what happens on their land, she sticks by him, protecting and guiding him. While he tries to navigate a magical world of insane adults and monsters that take their shape.

The story isn't just about childhood or fantasy creatures, but about memory and experience, how time changes us, but especially our perception. It's about innocence and feeling lost in a world that seems to know so much more than you do, and is always just so impossibly big. It is about so much more than it seems.

Which is exactly why it is so much fun. The author narrates it better than I think anyone else ever could, doing a great job with accents and dialects, tone and insinuation.

This truly was a wonderful little story and one I will enjoy many times over. Thanks, Neil!

  • The Tipping Point

  • How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference
  • By: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,156
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,645
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,606

In The Tipping Point, New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell looks at why major changes in society happen suddenly and unexpectedly. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a few fare-beaters and graffiti artists fuel a subway crime wave, or a satisfied customer fill the empty tables of a new restaurant. These are social epidemics, and the moment when they take off, when they reach their critical mass, is the Tipping Point.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sociology for the masses.

  • By Dean on 10-28-10

Malcolm Gladwell never disappoints!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-18

Always insightful and accessible, Gladwell has produced yet another excellent work.
The author's writing style and narration in the Audible edition is ease to understand and engaging.

The book itself looks at why certain ideas, brands, trends, etc catch on, while others do not. Who are the people who can convince so many to try something or to listen to them while ignoring others? How do they do it? Why do we follow their advice or example?

While not a long read necessarily, it is fascinating and informative. I'm definitely glad I picked it up, though after having read Gladwell's 'David and Goliath' I wasn't too worried about it being anything less than a five-star book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,545
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,361
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,029

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

  • By TheBookie on 06-04-18

Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-18

I won't lie an say this was an easy text to listen to. Not even close. Jordan Peterson does not throw his proverbial punches. He says it exactly how he sees it and then elaborates his position at great length with personal anecdotes, scientific research, and professional experience he has had as a psychologist.

If you are willing to do some hard self- and social-analysis, this book may truly change the way you view the world. It may not. I guarantee if you go into it objectively and willing to consider Peterson's extremely well thought-out and carefully worded advice, you will gain something from this book. Even when you disagree, which I certainly did at times, you can gain another clear and honest perspective -- and that is always valuable, in my humble opinion.

It is evident and worth noting that the author has strong political beliefs and values, as well as a Christian background and moral foundation. But he does not harp on any religion being right or wrong-- at all. So be assured that you can find value as a Buddhist, a Muslim, an athiest, or any other spiritual foundation you may have personally.

As for his political stance, as a political 'swinger' myself (as in I vote for the candidate's platform, apparent values and plan, NOT party affiliation), I found Peterson's beliefs to be heavily Right leaning, but don't be fooled by outside accusations of him being anti-liberal, sexist, etc. While he clearly feels strongly against certain political constructs, his views struck me as being more pro-humanity than any other petty label. Again, he backs his points with evidence of many types and explains why he believes as he does. This is how discourse begins, and how blind idealism without logic or critical analysis, ends. Peterson invites a conversation about how people often wear metaphorical blinders and how we might remove them and truly see each other's unique and often valid perspectives. This is how we as a society can grow. That said, sometimes I felt his points were specifically aimed at certain hot-button issues, which valid and valuable, got a tad soapbox-y.

Regardless of how I personally feel about his 12 Rules (which, to be clear, I mostly agreed with, at least in principle, if not always practice), I feel the book is absolutely valuable for EVERYONE to read. I will certainly be re-listening to it.

My biggest beefs with it is:
(a) sometimes the sentences were so dense with meaning I would have preferred to read them, rather than only listen. But that's just how I comprehend complex and often abstract ideas the best. That's just me. But it would be fantastic if the text was available with the audio.

(b) I just have to say -- the focus on women as mother's more than anything else cuts straight to a very personal place for me -- as I am unable to bear children -- so I personally felt a lot more like I was being indirectly told that I had fundamentally failed at something critical for my existence, failed my family, and society after finishing the book -- at least according to Peterson's greatest valuation of the feminine. I am confident that wasn't his intent AT ALL, so I am not offended, just saddened that it was not broached as a side-note as he went into great detail about mothers and women primarily as child-raisers. Biological motherhood is not always a 'choice' we can make, but society as a whole seems to view women primarily (and historically) in terms of their ability to produce offspring. That perspective needs to be reevaluated by everyone, in my humble opinion, including Mr. Peterson. I would like to hear his thoughts on that sensitive, and often devastating, subject. Are childless women still to be held in such high esteem? Or is that our only real value after all? I certainly hope not.

Regardless, I still gained a lot of perspective from this book, a lot to think about, and some of his points really spoke to me in powerful and positive ways, regardless of my gender. So thank you, Jordan Peterson for sharing your opinions, experiences, and values in such an open and deeply considered way.

951 of 1,052 people found this review helpful

  • A Discovery of Witches

  • A Novel
  • By: Deborah Harkness
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 23 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,641
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,765
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,797

Deep in the stacks of Oxford's Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Started out intriguing, devolved into Twilight 2.0

  • By Elina on 11-13-17

Disappointing

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-18

For all the hype, this book was a huge disappointment (Bless you, Audible, for making returns so easy). This was my first Audible book, so I was hoping for a great listening experience, but by no fault of Audible's, this was almost painful. I made it over 8 hours in, or somewhere in Chapter 14, which I'm actually rather proud of. And a bit saddened that I will never have that time back.

What I liked: The concept, premise, theory of the story - a story about a disillusioned witch trying to live a normal human life gets drawn into an ancient mystery about her roots, as well as those of vampires and demons. Sounds cool. Right?

Not so much. Here's what I didn't like:
* The MC, whose name slips my mind right now (1st POV side effect), is "intellectual" and not afraid to let you know it, too. She talks a big game about her immense intelligence, not to mention her skills at acting that were so mad good, she had to quit doing it because Stalkers! Let's not forget, she's a superb athlete as well - rowing day and night, jogging, yoga... there's not much the girl can't do. She's just that awesome. And smug. And pretentious. And whiney.
The narrator did NOT help this either. The breathy voice she used for the MC most of the time just came off as airheaded to me. Other times she just sounded like a snobby snot. Nope, I couldn't abide the main character from the start, but thought maybe I was jumping to conclusions, so I kept on. I shouldn't have.

** The perfectly perfect specimen of masculine perfection known as Matthew. Mind you, I learned that I don't like listening to this narrator quickly, so her voice for Matthew (not Matt, but I'm going to because...pretentious much?) with his cultured English accent was less than gripping. The dialogue was stuffy, anticlimatic, and downright irksome about the time Matthew and his buddy play billiards at the estate... I will resist ranting about what a waste of time that chapter was, because it was just one of many dead-ends.

*** The wastes of time ... the characters don't just do yoga together, they do it all the time. Vinyasas and downward dog and oh my! I just can't seem to get this pose right, why ever not?!? So traumatic and melodramatic and absolutely, utterly unimportant for the plot - at least that I can tell. Maybe something happens eventually and her yoga position is the very move she has to perfect in order to eventually escape the big bad antagonist (whom or what I still couldn't name at Chapter 14 - 8 Hours in!). Somehow I doubt this.

As if yoga wasn't exciting enough, we are led into vast exposition about her daily rowing trips, how she likes her tea, where she likes to sit in the Library at Oxford (Oh Oxford, somebody loves you very, very much because they write endlessly about your every dust mote.) And the wine... its age, the grapes, the weather that special year (which Matthew recalls vividly and gladly waxes poetic about). I stopped the recording at the MC's wonderment as Matthew takes her to some secret place (my ears perk. Maybe something will actually happen to propel the plot forward...) They enter the shadowy nether regions of Oxfords All Souls college together. He wants to show her something...

And its wine. Yup. Wine. I returned the book. Enough is enough. When I say this book was tedious, I am not exagerrating. The exposition on every little minute detail made my jaw ache from grinding my teeth at a certain point.

The highlights of the story were those moments when you think, here we go! Its gonna happen. Story is a'comin.'

But it never does. The just have some tea.

**** The plot. There must have been one. Right? They are supposedly looking for a book that has one brief appearance early on and then is ignored for the sake of *see above.* Or what about that wixked warlock that gives her a headache. That's got to go somewhere, some time, maybe, I think... I will never know. In 8 hours it didn't go a.n.y.w.h.e.r.e. Except to that cool mansion that Matthew built (but because he's as much an architectural genius, as he is a molecular biologist (or some such), wine coinnousuer, etc etc etc he is very modest about it) for yoga with other supernatural beings.

***** Finally, the narrator. She did a fine job reading clearly and audibly. Her accents were laudible. But something about the tone she took with the MC made their pretentious attitudes just that much more impossible to ignore. Her wonder and awe at something utterly un-awesome was almost condescending. It grated at me. So I gave up and will likely avoid books narrated by her. Maybe it was just this particular text though. That said, I think it's just a taste thing with the narrator. She did nothing wrong.

My final thoughts are that as I listened to this story (which I understand is boasting a new television series soon), I felt like the whole thing was one part wish-fullfillment and one part smarty-pants-ism (I'm sure thats a real word. ;-) As in, it reminded me of that kid who plays the part of the intellectual, carries the thickest books, debates 17th century French politics at the coffee shop while listening to music they don't even like, and humble-brags about their IQs every half-hour, because they desperately want you to think they are super-duper smart and cultured... That was this book. It so desperately wanted to be seen as "smart." It was trying so hard, it gave the opposite impression to me.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful