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  • 73
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  • 73
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  • Gone Girl

  • A Novel
  • By: Gillian Flynn
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan, Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 19 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49,811
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,360
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,452

It is Nick and Amy Dunne's fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick's clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn't doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media - as well as Amy's fiercely doting parents - the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he's definitely bitter - but is he really a killer?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Demented, twisted, sick and I loved it!

  • By Theodore on 01-20-13

Good book...until the end (no spoilers)

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-16

I really enjoyed this book...right up to the end. No spoiler alerts here, but I was pretty disappointed with how the book ended. Flynn did a great job of building up tension, misdirection, letting the reader think one thing while something else was actually going on. The book was well written, and then she threw it all away with that ending. Ugh.

I'm sure there are folks out there who loved the way the book ended, it just wasn't for me. Hence the 3 stars. Otherwise it would have easily been a 4, maybe 5 stars.

The narrators did a good job, but Kirby's voice grated on me for some reason. His acting though, was very good, as was Julia's.

  • A Feast for Crows

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,928
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,097
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,095

Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin’s monumental epic cycle of high fantasy that began with A Game of Thrones. Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace . . . only to be launched on an even more terrifying course of destruction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Jarring change in Dotrice's performance

  • By Pi on 06-21-12

Narrator ruined it for me. I stopped listening.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-16

I actually read the first three books, but due to time constraints decided to listen to the books 4 and 5. I got 1.5 hours into this book and had to stop. I couldn't take Dotrice's narration any more, he ruined it for me.

I read the reviews of his performances in the first three books and it sounds like he did an amazing job. Not sure what happened here, but he boned it. It's too bad.

I'm returning this book. Guess I'll find a way to make the time to actually read it.

  • The Aeronaut's Windlass

  • The Cinder Spires, Book 1
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: Euan Morton
  • Length: 21 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,222
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,347
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,340

Since time immemorial the Spires have sheltered humanity, towering for miles over the mist-shrouded surface of the world. Within their halls aristocratic houses have ruled for generations, developing scientific marvels, fostering trade alliances, and building fleets of airships to keep the peace. Captain Grimm commands the merchant ship Predator. Fiercely loyal to Spire Albion, he has taken their side in the cold war with Spire Aurora, disrupting the enemy's shipping lines by attacking their cargo vessels.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Brave New World

  • By Don Gilbert on 10-02-15

Not up to Butcher's standard. Disappointed!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-15

I love Jim Butcher. Dresden, Codex Alera, both amazing series, but this book...I just couldn't get into it. I was very disappointed.

The writing is fine, nothing wrong there, the problem for me was the story and the characters. The characters seemed "shallow" (i.e. they had no depth to them) and underdeveloped (or not developed at all). I didn't feel like they grew any throughout the book (with maybe Folly being the exception) and I didn't really care about any of them.

The story felt thin too. I understand it's the first book in the series, but I had no idea what the book was about, even at the end. I didn't feel like there was any build up of the story, no climax, no denouement. The fight scenes were well written, but the rest of the story fell flat in my opinion. Additionally, there were several parts of the book where I just quite paying attention. They were dull and long winded and I didn't feel they added anything to the story.

I like the premise Butcher started with. I love the airships, the magic system he created, all that stuff (not real crazy about the cats, they seem pasted on for the sake of filling major plot holes; i.e. "how can I write something in to explain how such-and-such happens"). Overall, I was disappointed and truly expected something better out of such an outstanding writer. I doubt seriously I will continue with this series as more books come out. It was all I could do to get through this one.

The one highlight for me was Euan Morton's narration. He did a great job.

  • Armada

  • A Novel
  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,830
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,642
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 33,579

It's just another day of high school for Zack Lightman. He's daydreaming through another boring math class, with just one more month to go until graduation and freedom - if he can make it that long without getting suspended again. Then he glances out his classroom window and spots the flying saucer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great unless you are expecting Ready Player One

  • By Tyler J. on 02-11-18

No, it's not RPO, but it's still decent

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-15

Many people are complaining that this book is not RPO, well, no, it's not, but that doesn't mean it's not a decent book. Cline hit a home run with RPO and anything he followed up with was going to be scrutinized heavily, but Armada was at least worth the listen, I didn't feel like it was a waste of my time.

That being said, there are definitely some issues with the book. First, the story was so so. It felt like he borrowed ideas from a bunch of other sci-fi books, threw them into a pot, and tried to cook up something new. It was half-baked and it shows at the end with the "big reveal." Second, the characters were pretty generic and all pretty much the same. There was no real diversity, they were all nerdy, video game loving people (whether they were a teenager or older adult). Finally, the nostalgia was absolutely not needed and a complete waste. In RPO the nostalgia is it's own character and very key to the book. In Armada, it felt like the nostalgia was there just for the hell of it, it had no bearing on the book what-so-ever (other than some limited tie-in with backstory) and the book would be either just as good or better without it.

By itself, Armada was a decent book and worth listening to, not a huge investment of time. The story was not great, but was definitely entertaining.

Wil Wheaton's performance in Armada was sooooo much better than in RPO, in my opinion. He did a much better job with differentiating the different character's voices in Armada. I like Wheaton as an actor, but I struggled with his narration of RPO. This was a marked improvement.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Thinblade

  • Sovereign of the Seven Isles, Book 1
  • By: David A. Wells
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 18 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,219
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,127
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,136

When second son Alexander Valentine loses his brother to an assassin's arrow, he discovers that his family protects an ancient secret and reluctantly finds himself at the center of the final battle of a war that was supposed to have ended two thousand years ago. Pursued by the dark minions of an ancient enemy, Alexander flees to the mountain city of Glen Morillian where he discovers that he is the heir to the throne of Ruatha, one of the Seven Isles, but before he can claim the throne he must recover the ancient Thinblade.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just the beginning...the series gets better!

  • By Jason on 02-07-15

Could have been so much more

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-15

While the story is not horrible and Wells seems to be a pretty decent writer, there are some glaring things about this book that really irked me.

One, everything comes way too easy for the main character, Alexander. A simple boy (his older brother was being groomed to be the savior of the world, not him), who at various points throughout the story admits he has no knowledge of fighting, war, politics, etc., somehow instantaneously gains vast knowledge in swordsmanship (granted he gains that through a magic book), becomes extremely adept at court politics, and is a master commander of men and fighting tactics. Where did all this come from? None of his retinue (sword master, wizard, bard, etc.) seem to actually teach him anything. Where is the character development? Which leads me to my next point.

Two, the characters are...boring. At no point in the book did I care what happened to any of them. They have no depth, there's no development, there's no growth, there are just kind of there, making their way through the world.

I couldn't wait to get to the end of this book, not because I wanted to see how it ended but because I just wanted it to be done. No way I continue the series, it's not worth the time for me.

Derek Perkins does a decent job with his narration. At no point did his recitation of the story bother me. He doesn't really add to or take anything away from the book.

6 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • The Martian

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 161,968
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 149,485
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 149,319

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he's alive - and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plainold "human error" are much more likely to kill him first.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth it even if you've seen the movie

  • By R. MCRACKAN on 12-08-17

A! MA! ZING!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-24-14

Wow! This book was...awesome! I was hooked from the beginning. I can't believe this is Weir's first book. The writing is seemless and it flows, which is helped along by the incredible story. I was so engrossed in this book. Weir paints an unbelievable picture and made me feel like I was right there beside Watney on Mars. I loved the problem solving aspect of the story and all the math and engineering (I guess it helps I'm an engineer by trade). Overall, this book is amazing! Get it, you won't be disappointed.

R.C. Bray's performance was just as amazing as the story. He IS Mark Watney.

  • Into the Storm

  • Book One of The Malcontents
  • By: Larry Correia
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 7 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,632
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,472
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,467

A knight of Cygnar follows a strict moral code. His integrity is beyond reproach. He holds himself to the highest standards whether dealing with friend or foe. And he values honor above all. The year is 606 AR, and Cygnar has been sorely pressed by its enemies both at home and abroad. In Caspia, the conflict with the Protectorate is about to erupt into full war with the looming invasion of Sul. The Cygnaran military is desperate for soldiers with the skill, strength, and bravery to take up the devastating galvanic weaponry of the new Storm Division.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • After 150 titles, first review of a fantasy story.

  • By Niv on 12-16-14

More Please!!!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-14

What a fun book! I play tabletop RPGs and have wanted to try the Iron Kingdoms RPG, but didn't realize this story was set in that world until after the fact. It didn't diminish the book at all. The story, writing, and characters were really quite good. The plot was a bit predictable, but the characters were so much fun, I was paying less attention to the plot than I was the people in the book. I loved the fantasy elements of the book too, the world, the people, the technology (which is less about Correia's writing than it is about the Iron Kingdom verse, but it was still very well written into the book by Correia).I wish this wasn't a one off because I would love to read more about Madigan's Malcontents!

Ray Porter's recitation of the book is absolutely amazing! This is the first book I've heard him narrate, and he's awesome. My next book may be decided based solely on if he's the narrator.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Bran Mak Morn

  • The Last King
  • By: Robert E. Howard
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 116
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 107
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 106

From Robert E. Howard's fertile imagination sprang some of fiction's greatest heroes, including Conan the Cimmerian, King Kull, and Solomon Kane. But of all Howard's characters, none embodied his creator's brooding temperament more than Bran Mak Morn, the last king of a doomed race.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Its not the mighty Conan

  • By rick on 10-10-15

These stories were not good

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-14

Based on the description, I was pretty excited about this book, but after the first story I was extremely disappointed. By the end, I was bored to tears. The stories were not interesting at all. I didn't care one bit for any of the characters, and I didn't feel like the writing was very good either. The stories just didn't grab me. It's a shame, I thought this was going to be a fun book, but it just wasn't for me.

2 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Agent to the Stars

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,381
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,382
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,370

The space-faring Yherajk have come to Earth to meet us and to begin humanity's first interstellar friendship. There's just one problem: They're hideously ugly and they smell like rotting fish. So getting humanity's trust is a challenge. The Yherajk need someone who can help them close the deal. Enter Thomas Stein, who knows something about closing deals. He's one of Hollywood's hottest young agents.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A stay-up-all-night-reading kind of book

  • By Katya A on 03-06-13

Fun book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-14

This was a fun book. It had a cute story and while the plot was a little on the weak side I felt like the characters and their relationships with one another really drove this book.

Wheaton's performance, while not great, wasn't horrible either. It was...pedestrian, and got the job done.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Skin Game

  • A Novel of the Dresden Files, Book 15
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 15 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 19,925
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 18,575
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 18,500

Harry Dresden, Chicago's only professional wizard, is about to have a very bad day.… Because as Winter Knight to the Queen of Air and Darkness, Harry never knows what the scheming Mab might want him to do. Usually, it’s something awful. He doesn’t know the half of it… Mab has just traded Harry’s skills to pay off one of her debts. And now he must help a group of supernatural villains - led by one of Harry’s most dreaded and despised enemies, Nicodemus Archleone - to break into the highest-security vault in town, so that they can then access the highest-security vault in the Nevernever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hold onto your staff; Harry’s back.

  • By Don Gilbert on 05-29-14

Good book, exactly what you'd expect

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-14

I love this series (and I really liked this book) and Butcher is an amazing author, but the Dresden books are starting to become a little bit of rinse and repeat. Let me explain, I love how Harry's story (and the stories of all his supporting characters) advances with each book. We learn more about Harry and the further down the rabbit hole we go the better the story gets. However, Butcher seems to be following a pattern lately, Harry gets into situations that are seemingly impossible to get out of, gets physically and mentally injured to the point of not even being able to maintain consciousness most times, and always gets out of the situation (although never unscathed, which I understand is part of Harry's character developing, the plot moving along, etc.). I don't have a problem with this scenario in general as long as it doesn't happen that often. The problem I have is that it seems to be happening with more frequency in the Dresden books, like two or three times a book, and it's getting a little old, and in Skin Game, I felt like there was a bit of deus ex machina which rubbed me the wrong way. Don't get me wrong though, I still thought it was a really good book and can't wait for the next installment in the series.

James Marsters IS Harry Dresden. There is no other way to put it. He was made for this role and his performance on this book was as amazing as all his others.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful