LISTENER

Max

United States
  • 32
  • reviews
  • 9
  • helpful votes
  • 94
  • ratings
  • A History of Russia: From Peter the Great to Gorbachev

  • By: Mark Steinberg, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Mark Steinberg
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 965
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 876
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 863

It's difficult to imagine a nation with a history more compelling for Americans than Russia. Before the collapse of the Soviet Union, this was the nation against which we measured our own nation's values and power and with whom war, if it ever came, could spell unimaginable catastrophe for our planet.Yet many Americans have never had the opportunity to study Russia in depth, and to see how the forces of history came together to shape a future so different from the dreams of most ordinary Russian people, eager to see their nation embrace Western values of progress, human rights, and justice.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not story-telling but history-telling at its best

  • By Shah Alam on 10-22-13

lots of mistakes

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-19

lots of mistakes
very superficial knowledge of Russia.
seems to have learned by books and not received feedback from Russians

  • The Triumph of Improvisation

  • Gorbachev's Adaptability, Reagan's Engagement, and the End of the Cold War
  • By: James Graham Wilson
  • Narrated by: Graham Christian Barnard
  • Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

In The Triumph of Improvisation, James Graham Wilson takes a long view of the end of the Cold War, from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979 to Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. Drawing on deep archival research and recently declassified papers, Wilson argues that adaptation, improvisation, and engagement by individuals in positions of power ended the specter of a nuclear holocaust.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • exceptional performance, suprficial text

  • By Max on 03-14-19

exceptional performance, suprficial text

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-19

the author is or pretends to be ignorant about undercover events, only the newspaper facts

exceptional performance, suprficial text
exceptional performance, suprficial text
exceptional performance, suprficial text

  • Capitalism in America

  • A History
  • By: Alan Greenspan, Adrian Wooldridge
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 262
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 229
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 228

From the legendary former Fed Chairman and the acclaimed Economist writer and historian, the full, epic story of America's evolution from a small patchwork of threadbare colonies to the most powerful engine of wealth and innovation the world has ever seen. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very good overview and explanation of economic development in USA since its founding

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-30-18

nice

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-19

the author makes a decent effort to provide measures that are meaningful for readers, such as fold change, percent change, value adjusted for inflation, but still, the text is polluted by many obscure units and numbers, for example, the absolute price without adjustment for inflation has no value for the listener, it is just noise. lots of meaningless numbers.

  • Plato's Republic

  • By: Plato
  • Narrated by: Ray Childs
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 682
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 623
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 617

The Republic poses questions that endure: What is justice? What form of community fosters the best possible life for human beings? What is the nature and destiny of the soul? What form of education provides the best leaders for a good republic? What are the various forms of poetry and the other arts, and which ones should be fostered and which ones should be discouraged? How does knowing differ from believing?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spectacular

  • By Benjamin Myers on 08-08-16

It is slow

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

We are spoiled by the fast pace of life, so listening to Plato is a bit too slow. Good ideas, great phylosophy, but hard to stay engaged. Good performance though.

  • Freemasons for Dummies, 2nd Edition

  • By: Christopher Hodapp
  • Narrated by: Tom Dheere
  • Length: 12 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 308
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 282
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 282

Take the mystery out of the Freemasons. Fascinated by Freemasons? Freemasons For Dummies is the internationally best-selling introduction to the Masons, the oldest and largest "secret society" in the world. This balanced, eye-opening guide demystifies Freemasonry, explaining everything from its elaborate rituals and cryptic rites, to its curious symbols and their meanings.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This should be required for all new Freemasons!

  • By Tony Virelli on 05-17-16

strerilized advertizement

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-19

sounds like a sterilized commercial for masonry.
boring, uninformative, biased, .
it would be nicer to know the masonic magic and the true state of affairs.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The History of Witchcraft

  • By: Lois Martin
  • Narrated by: Brogan West
  • Length: 3 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 27

Witchcraft has recently been undergoing a huge popular revival, but does modern pagan witchcraft really bear any resemblance to its historical antecedents? The witch in history was a very different creature from her modern counterpart, and this book sets out to explore the historical background to the European witchcraft phenomenon.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A brief look at the history of Witchcraft

  • By Steve Inman on 09-12-09

muggle

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

muggle muggle muggle.. muggle muggle
the author doesnt believe a thing.
sorry stupid audible requires a few more words to publish a review

  • The Genome War

  • How Craig Venter Tried to Capture the Code of Life and Save the World
  • By: James Shreeve
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 14 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 197
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

On May 10, 1998, biologist Craig Venter, director of the Institute for Genomic Research, announced that he was forming a private company that within three years would unravel the complete genetic code of human life, seven years before the projected finish of the U.S. government's Human Genome Project. Venter hoped that by decoding the genome ahead of schedule, he would speed up the pace of biomedical research and save the lives of thousands of people. He also hoped to become very famous and very rich.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • DNA/Microbiology 101

  • By Neil on 02-24-04

great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-17-18

e d d e d d e d e d e t re w g j y e w r h y e w rh u f wert

  • Life on the Edge

  • The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology
  • By: Johnjoe McFadden, Jim Al-Khalili
  • Narrated by: Pete Cross
  • Length: 12 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 274
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 244
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 243

Life is the most extraordinary phenomenon in the known universe; but how did it come to be? Even in an age of cloning and artificial biology, the remarkable truth remains: Nobody has ever made anything living entirely out of dead material. Life remains the only way to make life. Are we still missing a vital ingredient in its creation?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Finally, applied quantum mechanics for biology

  • By Michael Gallagher on 08-24-15

Exciting subject, inadequate style.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-18

i dont understand how it happened, but i find this listening uninspiring. i actually love the subject, love the authors, and find their youtube videos exciting. but here they may have gone too far trying to explain exciting science to an imaginary uneducated person. my point is that unenlightened people wouldnt listen anyway. i find the information content here too low, and the extent of accomodation of imaginary skeptics too high. there is no personality behind, the book is too sterile. they lost me when they dismissed skeptics and mystics lumped together. a true scientist showld be a mystic and a skeptic because most of modern science is conservative brainwash.

  • The Tangled Tree

  • A Radical New History of Life
  • By: David Quammen
  • Narrated by: Jacques Roy
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 474
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 435
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 432

In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field is horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the movement of genes across species lines. For instance, we now know that roughly eight percent of the human genome arrived not through traditional inheritance from directly ancestral forms, but sideways by viral infection - a type of HGT. In The Tangled Tree David Quammen chronicles these discoveries through the lives of the researchers who made them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Quammen at his usual best

  • By JohnS on 08-23-18

exceptional

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-18

exceptional. i am a researcher in the field and the science here is exceptional. much appreciation.
and i also loved the acting.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Phenomena

  • The Secret History of the U.S. Government's Investigations into Extrasensory Perception and Psychokinesis
  • By: Annie Jacobsen
  • Narrated by: Annie Jacobsen
  • Length: 17 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 303
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 280
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 276

For more than 40 years, the US government has researched extrasensory perception, using it in attempts to locate hostages, fugitives, secret bases, and downed fighter jets, to divine other nations' secrets, and even to predict future threats to national security. The intelligence agencies and military services involved include CIA, DIA, NSA, DEA, the navy, air force, and army - and even the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Now, for the first time, New York Times best-selling author Annie Jacobsen tells the story of these radical, controversial programs.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Phenomenally mediocre narration of a good book

  • By philip on 05-18-17

Unique, groundbreaking, extraordinary!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-18

I am very impressed and inspired. I have studied the subject quite extensively and this study has much new material and insights. The author's previous book on DARPA history was excellent too and was served a foundation for this book.

A few afterthought comments:

It is rather obvious from the book, that the closing of government research on remote viewing was done only to hide it and move to the private sector.

Same people seem to be involved except the government escaped from the scrutiny.

I find it notable that after all wonderful research, the author still is a nonbeliever, and describes an interest in channeling and aliens as a downfall of Puharich and someone else.

Also, the author fails to see that the interest of remote viewing in alien bases was practical and likely served the customers from above the chain of command. It is only that some viewers like Smith were not informed, they didn't need to know.

In summary, the fact that the author is a thorough nonbeliever made the book even better, we can trust the material even more since it often goes against the author's preference.

In the book, we observe a repeated pattern: as soon as research is criticized by the public, the project is closed, renamed, and moved to another agency. I say, most likely, it wasn't closed, but was made more secret and moved.
Most likely, the civilians and whistleblowers were not informed about its continuation.