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Andrew C

Canada
  • 14
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  • helpful votes
  • 15
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  • Understanding Michael Porter

  • The Essential Guide to Competition and Strategy
  • By: Joan Magretta
  • Narrated by: Erik Synnestvedt
  • Length: 6 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 468
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 397
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 390

Michael Porter’s groundbreaking ideas on competition and strategy have unfolded over three decades and are spread across a dauntingly long list of publications. Every manager can name individual pieces of his work - competitive advantage, the value chain, five forces - but no one, not even Porter himself, has put the entire puzzle together to reveal it as an integrated whole. This lucid, concise audiobook does just that. This book provides an engaging summary of Porter’s ideas and an invaluable synthesis of this important body of work....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book... but the narrator kills it

  • By Brad on 02-29-12

Get your Porter from a direct source

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-19

I admit that my previous understanding of Porter's work was based off indirect sources, mostly professors and colleagues. However, the filtering and processing of information can really have an impact on what Porter tries to get across.

I wish I had read this book earlier, it would have given me an upper edge at business school in having the ability to challenge a professor's use of Porter when it lacked rigor, and to more effectively apply the frameworks to business cases.

That being said, this book is helping me now to more effectively size up my organization's strategy, management's ability to craft and hone it, and has made me curious about ways to improve our positioning. Some of the most applicable insights I found were in his definition of a company's value proposition, learning the 5 tests of effective strategy - value proposition, tailored value chain, trade offs, fit, and continuity, the theory that you should outsource generic activities vs. one's that can be tailored to your value chain, shifting from core competence to the view of an organization as an entangled web of activities that fit together to drive value, learning successful cases like Ikea who created a 'web' by for example combining flat-packs and large retail locations with ample parking (putting these two together create a whole that is greater than the sum of parts), separation of industry and company performance, using the 5 forces to translate all the complexities out there into implications of market structure and attractiveness, and the three dimensions to assess strategy: cost, differentiation, and focus.

Addition to insights, I love and resonate with the message being the message that fills Porter's work: create positive sum value, have a long term focus, focus on ROIC only, be different not the best, make sure you define something diligently before you use it, don't try to please everyone, and live with a strong direction, sticking to and deepening it over time

I hope to read more of Porter's work soon, and that more of his great work will show up on audible.

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,643
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,646
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,327

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

  • By TheBookie on 06-04-18

May have some gold, but too much digging for me

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-19

A few things that bothered me:
Trying to overfit lessons/meaning from bible passages.
Thinking we are smart enough to theorize and explain all phenomena, like why humans fail to take medications but do so consistently for pets, vs. just surfacing that a phenomena does occur.
A tendency, common for medical practitioners to have a bias for intervention, and failing to bring up the concept of iatrogenics: that sometimes our naive attempt to intervene can hurt us.
The good vs. evil conversation. Semantics akin to 'evil' have been used to encapsulate that which we cannot understand, and should be discarded as they are antithetical to empathy and rational thought.

If you looking for some advice from a smart, respectable guy, read on. But advice is ubiquitous in the world we live in and has no bounds, I prefer empirical evidence.

  • The Laws of Human Nature

  • By: Robert Greene
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael, Robert Greene
  • Length: 28 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,836
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,501
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,488

Robert Greene is a master guide for millions of listeners, distilling ancient wisdom and philosophy into essential texts for seekers of power, understanding, and mastery. Now he turns to the most important subject of all - understanding people's drives and motivations, even when they are unconscious of them themselves. Whether at work, in relationships, or in shaping the world around you, The Laws of Human Nature offers brilliant tactics for success, self-improvement, and self-defense.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tempo is key! (1.25X)

  • By James Hawkins on 11-12-18

*Robert Greene's Laws of Human Nature

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

I always try to give a book a chance before judging its quality. I read the first four laws, and I do not believe there is enough value per word in this book for me to continue. I think the most value comes from the interesting stories he gathers and communicates, rather than his analysis, and will consider going through the book and cherry-picking the stories.

This book is not about laws, its about opinions, and opinions that have not been subject to significant scrutiny. I am careful to reach such books as I need to be sure to carefully curate the words. Based off my processing, Green's maxim is to master the art of wearing masks, and decoding masks of others to determine their character. I am viscerally bothered by this belief due to its inconsistency, and its creation of a zero sum game or 'prisoner's dilemma' in society. The more people to act on his maxim, the more convoluted masks people will wear in society, and the more 'computational effort' it will take to decode them. Greene's analysis fails to account for the emotional burden that results from wearing such a mask in your life. He also fails to fully address teleology/purpose of actions, and focuses on the means to getting somewhere, but it is notable that their hasn't been significant scrutiny of what that something is. The first law of rationality did provide some light to this, in becoming emancipated from emotions, and fostering our abilities to live in alignment with the logic in the world around us. However, I found a level of scatter from chapter to chapter.

I was skeptical before reading this book because of Greene's proclaimed ability to be the expert on power, war, and now human nature. While I have not read his book on power, I make up that he may be an expert on power that is in a laws of nature costume. Additionally, I am also skeptical when people require 48 laws or such to explain something. This flags me that over-fitting may be occurring, in simply communicating collectively exhaustive research on the subject, versus a scrutiny and filtering and sorting the data for the reader to prevent noise. I also have a fascination in why the previous reviews of this book appear to be so positive. I make up that a selection bias may occur in the first couple of months after a book's release, in that many of his promoters that have read his laws of power are rushing to read his new material, but they have already been selected to align with the beliefs of his writing.

Instead, read a true expert on the laws of behavior in an incredible book called 'Behave' by Robert Sapolsky.

  • Antifragile

  • Things That Gain from Disorder
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,391
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,754
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,736

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem, and in Antifragile he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events. For what Taleb calls the "antifragile" is actually beyond the robust, because it benefits from shocks, uncertainty, and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension. The antifragile needs disorder in order to survive and flourish. Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • How to focus on impact instead of risk

  • By E. Smakman on 05-03-13

Likely the most thought provoking book I've read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-19

Contrary to others, I do think Nassim is as smart as he thinks he is. It took me a couple of chapters to shift from initially thinking he was an inconsistent, bashful, narcissist, to appreciating his honesty, independent mind, consistency in beliefs, pro social nature, and praise of others he respects. I was extremely close to stopping reading but am very glad I didn't.

Its amazing that he's able to present his theories in various mediums - logic, mathematics, narratives, semantics, metaphors - which really allows you to fully grasp his ideas and realize they are robust from all angles. I experienced many 'aha' moments listening to him, as there is something that just feels intuitively right about his concepts, in contrast to opinions of other authors which I find can be a crap shoot and has not been subject to as much deep scrutiny.

I love how fragility can be determined by looking at the symmetry of a histogram, or by looking at a graph of two variables and observing concavity, or by identifying whether options are present to benefit from uncertainty or not, or even through intuition in identifying a feeling of rigidity and a Procrustean bed. All of these things seem unconnected at first glance but they connect beautifully. Many of his ideas revolve around the idea that we think we are smarter than we are, think we can predict catastrophe, think we can understand all relationships in complex systems, think we can do better than mother nature, and we cut off the legs of nature's variability to create pseudo-certainty. This results in a fassad of robustness, but fragility to catastrophe and massive downside is the ultimate foundation. We must resort to 'via negativa', getting rid of the things we do that are in contrast to nature and don't pass scrutiny by the burden of evidence. While we can prove things don't work, we have a hard time proving adding things will work, as absence of evidence doesn't equate with evidence of absence. However, our society commonly incorrectly gives the burden of evidence to the via negativa, such as in having to prove how the overuse of fossil fuels does cause harm. We think we can do better than tinkering in innovation, while this is what mother nature does, and almost all successful pharma and therapeutics have come from trial and error and empirical findings, such as Viagra which was intended as a heart medication. We intervene in life when the benefits to intervention are low, when we have mild symptoms, and their are hidden risks to intervention called 'iatrogenics.' On the flip side, when we are in times of distress, have a serious condition, or in the event of a black swan, we don't intervene enough and don't leverage all the tools we have. We think we can find a theory for everything that empirically seems to work, but that theory changes annually, it provides no benefit in application, and we trick ourselves into thinking 'taught birds how to fly,' while humans developed the plane through trial error and not through application of a theory developed by academia. Suckers think our knowledge must be constrained to what we have a theory or semantic for, even though our language will always be much inferior to truth, and the word for blue wasn't used until the 6th century. Countries get rich through resources, and poor money into education thinking it will bring them riches. An most importantly, we are in a world where there is more noise than ever around us, as the media, academics, bankers, consultants, bureaucrats, and many influencers don't have skin in the game; if their bridge falls, it will not be on them.

This book will truly effect the way I live my life and how I make important decisions. I'd recommend also getting a hard copy as there are a host of useful visuals that can help improve your understanding of the concepts. I look forward to returning to his other works after a small break, but only when it feels right, and only his oldest books, as Nassim would say.



  • The Culture Code

  • The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups
  • By: Daniel Coyle
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 7 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3,771
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,252
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,224

In The Culture Code, Daniel Coyle goes inside some of the world's most successful organizations - including Pixar, the San Antonio Spurs, and the US Navy's SEAL Team Six - and reveals what makes them tick. He demystifies the culture-building process by identifying three key skills that generate cohesion and cooperation and explains how diverse groups learn to function with a single mind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Anyone in a leadership position should read this

  • By Kimberly on 03-04-18

A lower level of granularity than others

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-18

The term psychological safety has been buzzing in business dialogue, and for good reason as it is imperative to a well functioning egalitarian and meritocratic organization. Coyle takes it to a next, more pragmatic level, through the term 'belonging cues,' which are small behaviors that create a sense of belonging with individuals, that together and overtime lead to psychological safety. Belonging cues can often be subtractive, getting rid of behaviors like cutting others off, having a hostile tone, aversion of eye contact, etc. They are also often embedded in heuristics, or rules of thumb or catchphrases, which can be very effective at driving cultural change. An example of this is Danny Meyer's multi-restaurant success in the New York restaurant space through the dissemination of catchphrases such as 'make the charitable assumption,' 'collecting and connecting the dots', and 'one size fits one'.

The metric of collisions is a critical determinant of the strength of social networks, or the number of people you bump into over a period of time and space, and this is one that Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh has used to design their work space. On top of psychological safety, Coyle brings up the need for all members of an organization to be vulnerability by showing and acknowledging fallibility to create a vulnerability loop, and have a shared purpose, both required to create a strong bond between individuals.

On top of the material, this book flows smoothly, is enjoying to read, easy to digest, and includes lots of case studies.

  • Measure What Matters

  • How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs
  • By: John Doerr, Larry Page - foreword
  • Narrated by: John Doerr, full cast
  • Length: 7 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,774
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,388
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,371

In Measure What Matters, Doerr shares a broad range of first-person, behind-the-scenes case studies, with narrators including Bono and Bill Gates, to demonstrate the focus, agility, and explosive growth that the Objectives and Key Results system has spurred at so many great organizations. This book will help a new generation of leaders capture the same magic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Educational, inspirational, entertaining, ~dry..

  • By James S. on 05-08-18

Roadmap from a turkey assembly to an organization

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-18

OKRs create a barbell combining two extremes. They simultaneously drive a teleological focus on where you're heading while scaffolding the lower level requirements to get there.

This structure of this book also maintains an 'OKR-like' structure. It provides the reader a mental picture of what effective organizational processes look like. Its about converting isolated dots on a grid, or dots that have been constrained to connect in a rigid hierarchy (pushed for by many organizations out of a human need for certainty), into a fluid, interconnected structure that maximizes the connections between nodes.

It then provides lower-level, pragmatic, rules of thumb for how to create this. Given many typical company practices do not align with these rules of them, the book tends to take a 'via negativa' approach of getting rid of organizational processes that haven't been empirically found to work but are accepted as the norm. Any 'via positva', or interventionist efforts to add processes, resources or priorities by a company have the burden of evidence - they must be proven to work (vs. having to find evidence of why they won't).

These rules of thumb include but are not limited to:
1. Don't tie compensation to OKRs, these should be treated as separate things. Doing so creates 'sandbagging', or a culture of aiming for lower targets to later show above-target performance and gain the concurrent financial benefits. Similarly, sales quota should not be tied to commission.
2. The benefit of feedback declines concavely with time. Annual reviews don't create a sufficient feedback loop to push organizations forward.
3. The cadence at which organizations measure their performance with respect to OKRs matters. A dual cadence often works best, particularly where quarterly (or potential monthly should it be sales) performance management is paired with more extensive yearly performance management.
4. An individual should have roughly 3-5 objectives, each with 3-5 key results tied to them.
5. Objectives are not focused on what you are doing, but where you are trying to go, and how what you are doing will help you get there.
6. Key results must be specific and measurable, and have a target outlined, and the outcome of all key results being met should equate with the objective being met.
7. Roughly 50% of a contributors objectives should be 'cascaded' or pertain to their bosses objectives, with the remaining 50% being related to more decentralized efforts, or interests where the contributor thinks they should allocate their time.
8. Barbells of opposition can be created within key results or metrics. This can be done through pairing quantity and quality metrics, and/or input and output metrics. This helps prevent perverse behavior of companies aiming to hit targets at the expense of being a solid company.
8. Contributors should have 30 minute weekly, or 1 hr biweekly meetings with their boss to get recognition for good work, get feedback, express pain points, provide feedback to their boss, and be informed about career progression.
9. OKRs are fluid, and can be changed over time subject to change in priorities.

I used these rules of thumb to create a sales compensation and quota plan for my company, get rid of many perverse incentives in alignment between the company and sales team, and set up its marginal economics and scalability for success. Their is now a buzz on our sales floor, a strong direction and motivation in hitting the demanding sales targets, and ultimately a more aligned organization in a common direction.

  • The Lessons of History

  • By: Will, Ariel Durant
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,615
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,292
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,277

The authors devoted five decades to the study of world history and philosophy, culminating in the masterful 11-volume Story of Civilization. In this compact summation of their work, Will and Ariel Durant share the vital and profound lessons of our collective past. Their perspective, gained after a lifetime of thinking and writing about the history of humankind, is an invaluable resource for us today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is a must for every Educated Person

  • By BradleyBurr on 10-29-07

Fundamental theories of man derived scrupulously

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-18

Some pieces of literature are able to escape from the engulfment of their time in history, and thus remain profound as time continues to pass and new generations become the readers. As a millennial born in 95, I can attest to the robustness of this book. All the noise of history aside, the Durants unveil the regularities of the past, spanning from the back and forth rebounding from different extremes in cultural ideals & systems, the aggregation of history into the phases of hunting (the longest duration), agriculture, and industry, which explain our unchanged individualistic nature and the recent emancipation of women and their rights, to how religion should be appreciated by even the non-religious in its impeccable role in cultivating morals, increasing social order, and elevating collective instincts, ultimately creating the foundation of liberty. What profound character/wisdom was conveyed by Durant, a non-religious, in declaring Jesus the most beneficial character in homo sapiens history. Please read this book for the sake of your own continued advancement from ignorance to broad-mindedness.

  • Scale

  • The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life, in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
  • By: Geoffrey West
  • Narrated by: Bruce Mann
  • Length: 19 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 741
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 653
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 648

Visionary physicist Geoffrey West is a pioneer in the field of complexity science, the science of emergent systems and networks. The term complexity can be misleading, however, because what makes West's discoveries so beautiful is that he has found an underlying simplicity that unites the seemingly complex and diverse phenomena of living systems, including our bodies, our cities, and our businesses.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating and clear enough for a lib arts major

  • By kwdayboise (Kim Day) on 05-29-17
  • Scale
  • The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life, in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
  • By: Geoffrey West
  • Narrated by: Bruce Mann

Fascinating patterns in 21st century life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-17

The main downfall of this book is that could be a lot more compact, and several times the author goes off on tangents that aren't that interesting or useful. Don't hesitate to fast forward if you feel a chapter is dull and useless- you're probably right.

Having said that, there are so many fascinating patterns and theories in this book that have changed the way I think about things on a regular basis. Animals scale sub-linearly with metabolism, as animals get bigger they require less energy per capillary, which results in larger animals living longer and having slower heart beats (although every animal has roughly the same number of heart beats in a lifetime). Companies scale sub-linearly as a result of economies of scale, which creates a pressure to get larger and eventually leads to lack of innovation and their demise. Cities on the other hand scale super-linearly due to social networks and information transfer, causing a quickening in the pace of life (people walk faster in cities, get paid more). To keep up with this rate of growth in the demand for energy and resources we must innovate to reset the clocks before collapse, at an ever increasing rate. Humans have separated themselves from other animals as our metabolism now has an internal component (through eating), and also a social component (we use products and services produced by these networks that require lots of energy), and therefore an average humans metabolic rate is unprecedented, and has resulted in longer lifetimes than we should have given our body mass.

West also cites the work of many other physicists and biologists, such as Dunbar's number, Zipf's law, Galileo's scaling laws, and more. Not a very technical book, but very conceptual and reveals fascinating patterns that you would never realize are part of every day life.

  • Principles

  • Life and Work
  • By: Ray Dalio
  • Narrated by: Ray Dalio, Jeremy Bobb
  • Length: 16 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,024
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,599
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,539

Ray Dalio, one of the world's most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he's developed, refined, and used over the past 40 years to create unique results in both life and business - and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Idea-meritocracy/Principles Reference

  • By Patrick Eberle on 06-30-18

Clear principles, easy read, motivating story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-17

Our lives are determined by our ability to develop, improve, implement, and eventually automate principles in our lives. As we work toward our goals, problems mean we need to work to add or change principles, or be more effective in their implementation. You can do this by following a process of recognizing problems, identifying the root causes, creating a plan to deal with the root causes, and implementing.

There are several key principles that Ray shares that were critical for me.
1. Life is all about meaningful work and meaningful relationships, and these are self reinforcing.
2. Democracy isn't optimal, this assumes each person is equally informed on a subject matter. Collective decisions should occur by 'believability weighting' each individuals opinions based on their past experience and success in the relevant area. Be conscious of your believability in a particular subject matter and act accordingly, understand whether you are the teacher or student.
3. Transparency and honesty are essential for growth. While it can be hard, we need to be open about ourselves, give honest feedback to others, and be able to take criticism. If problems don't come to the surface and there aren't incentives to ensure this happens, their are long term consequences for people and organizations.
4. Making ~10 uncorrelated bets will maximize return and minimize risk. Minimizing portfolio variance will reduce returns.
5. Don't settle for a suboptimal path, an ideal path to your goals almost always exists even though it may not seem to at the onset. Keep looking for it.
6. If you take 3 smart people and get them to triangulate, you are more likely to end up with the best answer. Ray talks about how he triangulated among several doctors opinions which may have saved his life.
7. Focus on understanding and arguing over the machine, not the answer. The same things happen over and over again, it's all about determining what 'one of those' we are looking at.
8. When hiring, prioritize character, then abilities, then skills. Character and abilities are required to make a hiring decision. Most interviews focus on skills (like understanding a particular computer software).
9. A computer can do a better job than a person when you tell it the algorithm the person was using. It then isn't influenced by the biases we have.

While the principles are simple, they are fundamental and have been tested in Ray's life. If your interested in how the economy works, I really recommend watching the YouTube video Economic Machine, I learned more in 30 minutes than I have in several macroeconomics courses. Great book on the life lessons on the most successful hedge fund manager.


  • Machine, Platform, Crowd

  • Harnessing Our Digital Future
  • By: Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee
  • Narrated by: Jeff Cummings
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 894
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 760
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 753

We live in strange times. A machine plays the strategy game Go better than any human; upstarts like Apple and Google destroy industry stalwarts such as Nokia; ideas from the crowd are repeatedly more innovative than corporate research labs. MIT's Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson know what it takes to master this digital-powered shift: we must rethink the integration of minds and machines, of products and platforms, and of the core and the crowd.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Both How AND Why for Techies

  • By Dan Collins on 08-11-17

1st chapter is dull, but keep reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-17

Any additional comments?

At the onset of this book, it seemed like it was going to be a very surface level book that jumps around citing several key business minds like Clay Christensen. This turned out to be quite wrong as I continued into the machine section. Within the section, I appreciated clarification of key concepts like supervised learning and AGI, being informed of the latest machine learning related successes and failures, and where the technology is going and what it will take to get it there. The same was true with the following chapters with the introduction of several novel concepts I have never heard before such as incomplete contracts law, polanyi's paradox, transaction cost economics, combinatorial innovation, and others, as well as more pop culture economic concepts like compliments being applied in areas I never would have thought of had I not read this book. I have not read First Machine Age so I'm not sure how this would change my feedback, but regardless I think this book is worth it as it will make you look at the emerging economy in a different way as well as training your business intuition through many recent case studies of success and failure in the 'digital economy.' Great read!

10 of 10 people found this review helpful