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Craig C.

austin, TX United States
  • 66
  • reviews
  • 93
  • helpful votes
  • 234
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  • West Cork

  • By: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Narrated by: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 22,985
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,523
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 20,525

This much we do know: Sophie Toscan du Plantier was murdered days before Christmas in 1996, her broken body discovered at the edge of her property near the town of Schull in West Cork, Ireland. The rest remains a mystery. Gripping, yet ever elusive, join the real-life hunt for answers in the year’s first not-to-be-missed, true-crime series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • EXCELLENT.

  • By Ilia on 03-07-18

Too long

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

There is too much repetition. It is interesting at points, but it moves so slow back-and-forth that makes it frustrating.

  • The Doomsday Machine

  • By: Daniel Ellsberg
  • Narrated by: Steven Cooper
  • Length: 14 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 490
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 442
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 439

The Doomsday Machine is Ellsberg's hair-raising insider's account of the most dangerous arms buildup in the history of civilization, whose legacy - and renewal under the Obama administration - threatens the very survival of humanity. It is scarcely possible to estimate the true dangers of our present nuclear policies without penetrating the secret realities of the nuclear strategy of the late Eisenhower and early Kennedy years, when Ellsberg had high-level access to them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating Insider Story

  • By Terry Masters on 12-07-17

Too much luck to feel safe

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

Some of the early part of the book wasn’t captivating, but the sections concerning how loose the controls on the unleashing nuclear war were frightening. The one strategy that the U.S had was to launch all of our missiles at all of the cities in Russia and all of the cities in China was crazy. It would have resulted in genocide of not only those two countries and a billion immediate deaths, but by bringing on nuclear winters would have resulted in the wiping out human society worldwide. The strategy wasn’t even known by the presidents. It was too top secret for them to know. Ellsberg doesn’t know what the current strategic plan holds.

Total nuclear war is suicide and genocide for everyone. DOOMSDAY. Big Button Trump makes many of us nervous.

  • Against Empathy

  • The Case for Rational Compassion
  • By: Paul Bloom
  • Narrated by: Karen Cass
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 633
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 565
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 548

Most people, including many policy makers, activists, scientists, and philosophers, have encouraged us to be more empathetic - to feel the pain and pleasure of others. Yale researcher and author Paul Bloom argues that this is a mistake. Far from leading us to improve the lives of others, empathy is a capricious and irrational emotion that appeals to our narrow prejudices. It muddles our judgment and often leads to cruelty. We are at our best when we are smart enough not to rely on it and draw upon a more distanced compassion.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Starts strong, fizzles out.

  • By Tristan on 04-04-17

Emotional Empathy and Cognitive Empathy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-17

The book can be summed up by the author creating two types of empathy--emotional empathy and cognitive empathy. He makes a good point in that sharing the feelings of the others cold mean feeling helpless and depressed because the other person feels that way. He prefers cognitive empathy which means understanding the others feeling and situation and not joining with them and suffering too.

He makes a good point that we frequently feel or identify with others who are like us. Leading to in-group bias and letting our feelings override our since of fairness in awarding limited resources. For instance, a male boss feels the struggle of a male employ trying to provide for his family, and thereby, pays him more than a single female employ.

One of my own biases was a female reader speaking the voice for Bloom which seemed awkward when the reader makes personal statement as if she is a man. The reader was very competent.

  • Killers of the Flower Moon

  • The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
  • By: David Grann
  • Narrated by: Will Patton, Ann Marie Lee, Danny Campbell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,743
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6,101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,082

In the 1920s the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An outstanding story, highly recommended

  • By S. Blakely on 06-22-17

One of the later forms of American Genocide

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-17

Provides a description of the latter day vestiges of the American Genocide. "Race" was used as proxy of mistreating and exploiting people. American institutions failed and many American people failed. It is a wonder that a response like terrorism never really developed. Justice denied means many people lied and many more accepted the lies because it was inconvenient not to accept and ignore.

  • On Tyranny

  • Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century
  • By: Timothy Snyder
  • Narrated by: Timothy Snyder
  • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,723
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,472
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,448

The Founding Fathers tried to protect us from the threat they knew, the tyranny that overcame ancient democracy. Today, our political order faces new threats, not unlike the totalitarianism of the 20th century. We are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required reading

  • By A. R. S. on 04-17-17

Short and To The Point

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-17

Concise tightly written piece that provides straight forward assertions followed by support and evidence. Summarizes a lot of history and ties the conclusions to understandable concepts. Timely because of the dangers posed by Trump extremism.

  • The Death of Expertise

  • The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why It Matters
  • By: Tom Nichols
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 8 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 496
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 454
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 450

People are now exposed to more information than ever before, provided both by technology and by increasing access to every level of education. These societal gains, however, have also helped fuel a surge in narcissistic and misguided intellectual egalitarianism that has crippled informed debates on any number of issues. Today, everyone knows everything and all voices demand to be taken with equal seriousness, and any claim to the contrary is dismissed as undemocratic elitism.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By iKlick on 09-10-17

Describes our current situation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-18-17

Describes the path to our current situation of fake news and alternative truths. It would be useful for all Americans to read this.
The author had trouble trying to identify solutions to this quandary. There are no clear paths for ways to make the cultural and social changes to reverse the thinking patterns that have us in seemingly endless loops.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

FREE: Ponzi Supernova audiobook cover art
  • FREE: Ponzi Supernova

  • By: Steve Fishman
  • Length: 2 hrs and 38 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,268
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,917
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,914

Free for a limited time. Ponzi Supernova is an original audio series that profiles Bernie Madoff, the Wall Street financier sent to prison for orchestrating the largest Ponzi scheme in history. The series, hosted by journalist Steve Fishman, includes hours of unheard conversations with Madoff behind bars, as well as interviews with law enforcement and the victims.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • wow the story is a deep one

  • By Josh on 04-19-17

Every member of Congress should listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-17

Every member of Congress should listen and should be required to tell their constituents what they are going to do about this. How are they going to PROTECT the public?

  • Age of Anger

  • A History of the Present
  • By: Pankaj Mishra
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 12 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 218
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 196
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 189

How can we explain the origins of the great wave of paranoid hatreds that seem inescapable in our close-knit world - from American shooters and ISIS to Donald Trump, from a rise in vengeful nationalism to racism and misogyny on social media? In Age of Anger, Pankaj Mishra answers our bewilderment by casting his gaze back to the 18th century before leading us to the present.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An important, difficult yet flawed book - deserves

  • By Carl A. Gallozzi on 05-23-17

Language and Ideas are Highbrow

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-17

The language and ideas are highbrow, but they are not always well connected for the reader or listener. Some interesting concepts that are global in scope and highly abstract, but are hard to connect to concrete world. It might be one of those books that are better read than listened to. One that you underline or write in the margins, so you can flip back to an earlier idea.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • America's Original Sin

  • Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America
  • By: Jim Wallis
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 89
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 88

America's problem with race has deep roots, with the country's foundation tied to the near extermination of one race of people and the enslavement of another. Racism is truly our nation's original sin. "It's time we right this unacceptable wrong", says best-selling author and leading Christian activist Jim Wallis. Fifty years ago, Wallis was driven away from his faith by a white church that considered dealing with racism to be taboo.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Raced in America - so true!

  • By Michanne on 04-11-16

A little to preachy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-17

The book was a little to preachy for my taste. It may have seemed that way because it was the audio version. His stories an examples were to inspire optimism, but in the grand scheme of things, seemed to be drops in large bucket. With the rise in Identity Politics exemplified by Trump, his exhortations for liberal identity politics seems to be a losing strategy which helps provoke whites to rally to Trump.

  • Pre-Suasion

  • Channeling Attention for Change
  • By: Robert Cialdini Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: John Bedford Lloyd
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,122
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,695
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,666

The author of the legendary best seller Influence, social psychologist Robert Cialdini, shines a light on effective persuasion and reveals that the secret doesn't lie in the message itself but in the key moment before that message is delivered.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clever and Useful

  • By David on 01-02-17

Strength of Correlation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-17

I enjoyed the book. It flowed well. I was concerned that all findings were reported without the strength of correlation being stated as if all findings were 100% predictive and causal. Even popularizers of research need to explain that findings are not reporting absolutes, but tendencies. .