LISTENER

Christopher

Milwaukee, WI, United States
  • 12
  • reviews
  • 50
  • helpful votes
  • 45
  • ratings
  • The Republic for Which It Stands

  • The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896
  • By: Richard White
  • Narrated by: Noah Michael Levine
  • Length: 34 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 88
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81

At the end of the Civil War the leaders and citizens of the victorious North envisioned the country's future as a free-labor republic, with a homogenous citizenry, both black and white. The South and West were to be reconstructed in the image of the North. Thirty years later Americans occupied an unimagined world. The unity that the Civil War supposedly secured had proved ephemeral. The country was larger, richer, and more extensive but also more diverse.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Be wary of narrator

  • By Kate on 05-25-18

A historical view of history by today' standards.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

I liberal historian looking at history thru the glass of today....... it doesn't work. You can't go back and rewrite history.

13 of 37 people found this review helpful

  • Above and Beyond

  • By: Casey Sherman
  • Narrated by: Maxwell Hamilton
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 17

From the authors of the best-selling The Finest Hours comes the riveting, deeply human story of President John F. Kennedy and two U-2 pilots, Rudy Anderson and Chuck Maultsby, who risked their lives to save America during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During the ominous two weeks of the Cold War's terrifying peak, two things saved humanity: the strategic wisdom of John F. Kennedy and the U-2 aerial spy program.  On October 27, 1962, Kennedy, strained from back pain, sleeplessness, and days of impossible tension, was briefed about a missing spy plane.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Narrator’s mispronunciations detracted from the story

  • By Stephen E. Smith on 08-01-18

Skip the first half of the book.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-18

The authors are not good historians. They padded the first half of the story with some many historical inaccuracies, I was yelling at the book, one example was calling a C47 a Globemaster!
There were so many more I couldn't believe it. The narrator was also infuriating. MIG alley in Korea was narrated as "M" "I" "G" alley..............

A rehash of John Kennedy PT105 experience was unneeded. The authors try to put them selves in Kennedy's' head to draw parallels between PT105 and the Missile crisis. To much speculation on how Kennedy might have felt.

That being said, the 1/2 half of the book about the Missile Crisis was informative. It was covered from both USSR and USA sides in a fair "timeline" fashion.

Note to the authors: Please the next time you write about aviation history during 30's-50's please have your facts checked by an aviation historian. Then I won't have to yell at the narrator!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The True Flag

  • Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire
  • By: Stephen Kinzer
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 367
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335

How should the United States act in the world? Americans cannot decide. Sometimes we burn with righteous anger, launching foreign wars and deposing governments. Then we retreat - until the cycle begins again. No matter how often we debate this question, none of what we say is original. Every argument is a pale shadow of the first and greatest debate, which erupted more than a century ago. Its themes resurface every time Americans argue whether to intervene in a foreign country.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Timely and important

  • By Joshua C. Packard on 02-20-17

A lot of fair history until the end.............

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-18

The author with a slight liberal slant puts forth the argument at the start of the 20th century about imperialism vs anti imperialism. He does as fair of a job as he could until the end........
he went on a rant about how any American intervention is wrong, except in one case when Obama used it........... Read everything but the last 2 chapters.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Bunk

  • The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News
  • By: Kevin Young
  • Narrated by: Mirron Willis
  • Length: 20 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 40

Bunk traces the history of the hoax as a peculiarly American phenomenon, examining what motivates hucksters and makes the rest of us so gullible. Disturbingly, Young finds that fakery is woven from stereotype and suspicion, race being the most insidious American hoax of all. He chronicles how Barnum came to fame by displaying figures like Joice Heth, a black woman whom he pretended was the 161-year-old nursemaid to George Washington.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Unlistenable

  • By Carolinkus on 11-28-17

The author blames everything on racism...........

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-18

I waded thru this book waiting to find something note worthy. The author blames all the things listed on the front cover all fall to racism. Two thirds of the way thru the book I looked up the author. It seems that racism is his major authoring theme. Granedt there were a few ( very few) good and correct points, however to blame racism for everything instead of personal responsibility is very myopic.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Prairie Fires

  • The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • By: Caroline Fraser
  • Narrated by: Christina Moore
  • Length: 21 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 609
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 560
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 560

Millions of fans of Little House on the Prairie believe they know Laura Ingalls - the pioneer girl who survived blizzards and near-starvation on the Great Plains, and the woman who wrote the famous autobiographical books. But the true story of her life has never been fully told. Now, drawing on unpublished manuscripts, letters, diaries, and land and financial records, Caroline Fraser masterfully fills in the gaps in Wilder's biography.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spoiler Alert: Do Not Read If You Don’t Want Your Childhood Memories Destroyed

  • By Leslie on 03-05-18

Good read, heavy liberal slant by author

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-17

I enjoyed this book, but the author has a basis against conservatives. The author goes into long diatribes at times in the book especially at the end. She hates fracking, oil production, pipelines and large scale farming. It would be a better book if the author would have stuck to the story with out her basis.

8 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

  • A Political Life
  • By: Robert Dallek
  • Narrated by: Rick Adamson
  • Length: 29 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67

In an era of such great national divisiveness, there could be no more timely biography of one of our greatest presidents than one that focuses on his unparalleled political ability as a uniter and consensus maker. Robert Dallek's Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life takes a fresh look at the many compelling questions that have attracted all his biographers: how did a man who came from so privileged a background become the greatest presidential champion of the country's needy?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not bad but,

  • By Christopher on 12-20-17

Not bad but,

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-20-17

Not bad, but has errors in the side stories used to flesh out story.
Most likely a research assistant errors not caught by the author.

Example: Authors states Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic in 1925, it was 1927.
Authors says that all the Doolittle raiders shot down in China died in captivity. 4 survived at POW's thru the war.
These only 2 of 5 caught reading the book. These are "side" story that don't impact the FDR story line, But I would expect an author of this caliber not to make these errors.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • First World Flight

  • By: Spencer Lane
  • Narrated by: Dave Wright
  • Length: 17 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

In 1924, three years before Lindbergh flew to Paris, four young army airmen answered the call of General Billy Mitchell to save US aviation from destruction by the politicians by winning the race with a dozen other nations to make the first flight around the world. In primitive open-cockpit biplanes powered by unreliable engines and few airfields, they were given little chance of success or even survival.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I true story, but over embellished

  • By Christopher on 10-12-17

I true story, but over embellished

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-17

The story is good, but the author over embellishes the story with wrong or misleading info.
Examples:
He makes reference to T. Roosevelt being imperialistic in 1898, he wasn't president until 1901.
He states that, Billy Mitchell while flying recon of San Miguel he flew over Douglas MacArthur and Geo. Patton and saluted them, figuratively maybe, literally not. Patton was wounded and Mac was way to busy to care.
He states the Mitchell met with Adm. Yamamoto in 1924. Yamamoto was not an Adm in 1924.
He states the Japanese were in China in 1924, they didn't invade until 1931.

The store is a good one, but one wonders what else he got wrong. He should have run this past some historians.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Mission

  • Jimmy Stewart and the Fight for Europe
  • By: Robert Matzen, Leonard Maltin - foreward
  • Narrated by: Peter Berkrot
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101

In March 1941 Jimmy Stewart, America's boy next door and recent Academy Award winner, left fame and fortune behind and joined the United States Army Air Corps to fulfill his family mission and serve his country. He rose from private to colonel and participated in 20 often-brutal World War II combat missions over Germany and France. In mere months the war took away his boyish looks as he faced near-death experiences and the loss of men under his command. The war finally won, he returned home with millions of other veterans to face an uncertain future.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Penetrating Telling of Jimmy Stewart's War Years

  • By David on 05-09-17

Should be called historical fiction.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-17

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

The story based on the fact that Jimmy Stewart was a bomber pilot in WWII, true! But Jimmy Stewart NEVER talked about how he felt about the war and his place in it. The author puts himself in Stewart's' head and tell us how he felt...............The author doesn't know how Stewart actually felt. The author assumes Stewart was "Flak Happy" and suffered from what we now call "PTSD". Yes, Stewart was changed by the war, but since Stewart never discussed this with even his family, it is pure conjecture by the author. Jimmy Stewart was proud of his service. He continued with the Air Force and retired a Brig. General. He made movies promoting the Strategic Air Command. If his service had damage him to any great extent, he won't had allowed his stepsons to join the military, One of which lost his life in Vietnam.
The authors facts are also in question, P38's, P47's and P51's did escort bombers. But never at the same time. The P38 and P47's could only go a far as the Belgian border of Germany even with drop tanks. The P51's met up with the Bombers when the went in to Germany and would go all the way to the target starting in Jan 44. After the Bombers exited Germany then the shorter range 38's and 47's at separate intervals would escort them to the English channel.

Has Mission turned you off from other books in this genre?

No, just books by this author.

What three words best describe Peter Berkrot’s performance?

Clear. expressive, dramatic.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

NO!

Any additional comments?

The author has done Mr. Stewart's memory a disservice.

5 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The Hearts of Men

  • A Novel
  • By: Nickolas Butler
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 11 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 54

Camp Chippewa, 1962. Nelson Doughty, age 13, social outcast and overachiever, is the bugler, sounding the reveille proudly each morning. Yet this particular summer marks the beginning of an uncertain and tenuous friendship with a popular boy named Jonathan. Over the years Nelson, irrevocably scarred from the Vietnam War, becomes scoutmaster of Camp Chippewa while Jonathan marries, divorces, and turns his father's business into a highly profitable company.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed the story but the narrator

  • By Kitt on 05-07-17

Just a Bad book!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-12-17

Would you try another book from Nickolas Butler and/or Adam Verner?

This no. The Narrator is fine.

What could Nickolas Butler have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

This author thinks that morality is passe. He mocks Scouting, fatherhood and any kind of moral code to live buy. He paints fathers with no morals, and telling there sons that " if it feels good do it" no matter what the consequences are.

Which character – as performed by Adam Verner – was your favorite?

Nelson

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

I feel sorry for that author, he must of have a bad childhood. He show disdain for anyone with morals. It "ok" to cheat on your spouse, have sex with prostitutes. And to tell your son that it ok to be selfish.

2 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The President Will See You Now

  • My Stories and Lessons from Ronald Reagan's Final Years
  • By: Peggy Grande
  • Narrated by: Peggy Grande
  • Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 56

An affectionate and intimate memoir about Ronald Reagan by his longtime personal assistant, who worked closely with the president for 10 years after he left the White House.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great insight to Reagan's post presidency

  • By Anonymous User on 11-02-18

Excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-17

What made the experience of listening to The President Will See You Now the most enjoyable?

The emotion in this book is overwhelming! It is the most emotional book I have ever read. I am a 50ish male and i was crying thru most of the book.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The President Will See You Now?

The whole book!

What about Peggy Grande’s performance did you like?

He personal expression and emotion.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful