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Sarah R. Jacobs

  • 49
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 327
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  • The Wolfen

  • By: Whitley Strieber
  • Narrated by: Robert Fass
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 110
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 103

In the dark, they are watching... They are waiting for you. No one has ever lived to tell the horrifying truth about them. Yet even now the Wolfen are gathered in the night-dark alleys ... unseen, poised ... ready to destroy their helpless human prey. Only one man and one woman, trained cops, willing to risk their lives, stand in the way

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Classic Narrated Wonderfully by Robert Fass

  • By PerryMartinBookReviews on 12-13-14

Resisted reading any Whitley Strieber...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

... for decades. I've always had a problem with people who go along with crap like Close Encounters of the Fourth Kind (i.e., abduction by the crew of a UFO, by space aliens).

Lately, I've been tentatively dipping into the vast pool of the works of writers who sell snake oil of a kind, but whose every dose sold is reputed to be decanted to a well-crafted vial of a book, from an aged oak (or whatever wood is supposed to be best for the storage of snake oil) barrel of a mind.

Strieber's work was recommended in Stephen King's _Danse Macabre_, his meditation upon archetypal horror stories and horror story elements. The King who wrote _Danse Macabre_ is the King who wrote vivid, inspired updates of Lovecraft and resettings/updates of William Hope Hodgson (for instance, Bobbi Anderson and her dog, Peter, who are clearly direct descendants of Hodgson's unnamed character/narrator, The Recluse, and his dog, Pepper, from _The House on the Borderlands_).

I took the recommendation, and I am not sorry I did.

In several pieces of writing, King says that Strieber is a better writer than King, himself, is. He's right. Strieber also does a very good job of keeping the New York of Tom Wolfe's _The Bonfire of the Vanities_'s era well-preserved in amber. It's the same New York encountered by anyone who's seen the pilot episode of the first of the Law & Orders, "Everybody's Favorite Bagman."

And the Wolfen, themselves, are a treat among treats. They are a convincingly-written and invented, mythical, hidden, apex predator species, whose evolution's at times complete hiddenness from the recorders of mankind's historians and chroniclers is described and explained in a way that, if such a species actuallly existed, would have been a plausible and totally possible unseen strand of their warped woof [sorry. couldn't help myself] thread in the tapestry of history.

There is nothing supernatural or Mary Sue-ish about the Wolfen or about the humans, in this werewolves-added version of the Earth and New York. The Wolfen are flawed, and the humans are flawed and conscious of the fallen state of humanity. The Wolfen have not yet figured out that their lack of opposable thumbs, and their inability to display or feel true humbleness or humility, is what causes them to fall, time and time again, out of their own State of Grace, which consists largely of cities described in terms that are a carnivorous anthropophage's version of the Garden of Eden. Their pride in their superior senses, agility, strength, and speed are the causes of their repeated Fall from Grace in the eyes of Man.

There's a lot more. But this is the first convincing construction of a believable werewolf species I have ever come across.

  • Lord of the Dead the Secret History of Byron

  • By: Tom Holland
  • Narrated by: Richard E. Grant
  • Length: 3 hrs and 3 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 21

From the Levant to London's society salons to the canals of Venice, famed poet Lord Byron embarks on a life of adventure as the world's most notable vampire, following a dark trail of long-hidden secrets, ancient black arts, and the depths of evil.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Decent, but I wouldn't get this as an audiobook

  • By Amanda on 10-04-12

if you are a real vampire fan...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-18

... you will adore this. it is Richard E. Grant reading a gorgeously-written scholarly vampire novel.

the mythos is intriguing.

the kill scenes are more sensuous than any I've read thus far.

it's Lord Byron.

written by a man born in Oxford, who went to Cambridge University.

Cambridge scholars who write genre fiction are as rare as hens' teeth. read this!

  • Little Slaughterhouse on the Prairie

  • By: Harold Schechter
  • Narrated by: Steven Weber
  • Length: 1 hr and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 471
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 391
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 392

At a remote little inn not far from the Kansas homestead of Laura Ingalls Wilder lived the Bender family. These pioneers welcomed unwary visitors with jackrabbit stew and a sledgehammer to the skull. In time, their apple orchard gave up its secrets - a burial ground for their mutilated victims, each stripped of their possessions. The devilish enterprise on “Hell’s Half-Acre” would earn the Bloody Benders an undying place in the annals of American infamy. But it was the mysterious fate of eldest daughter, Kate, that would make them the stuff of mythic campfire prairie tales.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Detailed retelling of horrific events

  • By Tatiana on 08-07-18

Fantastic Examination of the Himan Soul and Mind,

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-18

...as usual.

and, as if that wasn't enough, there are two very dramatic examples of two kinds of false memories included.

If only the attorneys, judge and jury in The People of the State of California vs. George Thomas Franklin, Sr., had known about Mrs. Mccann's "dream memory"-inspired accusation of the elder and younger Monroe women, they might have slowed down enough to keep from their embarrassing arrest of Mr. Franklin based upon "dream memory" evidence of his daughter's.

  • Casting The Runes

  • The Complete Ghost Stories of M. R. James
  • By: Montague Rhodes James
  • Narrated by: David Collings
  • Length: 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 14

This is the unabridged audio recording of M R James' excellent ghost story "Casting The Runes". Read by David Collings, this is sure to scare and delight in equal measure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An apt allegory for the fate of..<br />

  • By Sarah R. Jacobs on 06-10-18

An apt allegory for the fate of..<br />

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-18

...the heterodox in the academy in any era.

These days, it's Conservative runes versus Socialist runes, and the Beast forms when there are Men (or Women) In Groups.

At that point, Man Is Wolf To Man, and the arch and unforgiving sharpened barbs of wit (or at least if verbalized cruelty, anyway) do their work, while the packs rend academic from career in intellectual villages throughout the Harz Mountains that are the Humanities.

  • Dangerous Daddy's Bad Girl

  • Mile High Club, M-F Adventure Thrill Seeking XXX Erotica (Dangerous Daddy's Bad Boy)
  • By: Alex Anders
  • Narrated by: Alex Anders
  • Length: 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 21

Fox, a breathtaking 19-year-old girl, throws her clothes out of the plane during her skydiving lesson inviting Hunter, her new step-daddy, to join the Mile High Club. But when her daddy reacts with rage towards the nubile beauty, she is trapped 6,000 feet in the air with sexy man that threatens to toss her out of the plane unless she does everything he says.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Worst Narration in the History of narrations

  • By Ornella Davis on 12-31-12

Disappointing.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

Why are female subs always supposed to be annoying brats and male subs are something akin to noble squires or knights errant? Why is there no room in male Dominants' minds for an honorable female sub who just f***s up every now and again, just like a male sub might, instead of f***ing up because she feels like enraging her Dom?

I enjoyed the Bad Boy series because I like and identify with the sensibility of that power/honesty/honor dynamic.

Why are there no male Doms who write for women who don't want to be brats?

  • West Cork

  • By: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Narrated by: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 22,134
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,770
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 19,767

This much we do know: Sophie Toscan du Plantier was murdered days before Christmas in 1996, her broken body discovered at the edge of her property near the town of Schull in West Cork, Ireland. The rest remains a mystery. Gripping, yet ever elusive, join the real-life hunt for answers in the year’s first not-to-be-missed, true-crime series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ENTERTAINING AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING

  • By Ann on 02-13-18

Why only one cop?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-18

There's hours of narcissistic equivocation and... "creativity"... from Ian "The Cops Here Aren't Used To Dealing With Educated Chaps Like Me" Bailey.

I'm trying to figure out why the authors don't see that the reason he tried on so many masks and none of them fit, is that there has to be something underneath the mask for it to hold onto. How did they never consider the idea that Bailey has a profound personality disorder, probably Narcissistic Personality Disorder (but he can't be diagnosed by a lay person from a distance)? And that that is the reason that he is superficially charming, but a failure at everything he puts his hand to (because he believes that charisma is a magic product-producing machine, so he need not try at anything past the time when he gets too bored to do anything but drink, smoke weed, and trash other people's places)? That that is why his plans, his writing, and his self-concept, are all so grandiose?

Does it occur to them that maybe the police aren't so horrible as the opportunistic, lying ex-army friend in need of Bailey's says they are? That maybe the reason they only had one pathologist was that Ireland couldn't afford another one, and their budget was stretched thin enough already without grifters latching on and taking what they have left while promising to help keep a murderer off the streets?

There's far more time given to Marie "Let's See How Many Times I Can Hang The People I Lie To Out To Dry While I Get Tons Of Attention And Possibly A Book Or Movie Deal" Farrell than any journalist with any sense would have given her.

Did it really never occur to the authors that the reason she used her sister's name for the call to the Gardaí was that she wanted there to be a door open for her finally settling the blame for the call *on her sister* when she'd changed her story enough times that nobody believed her anymore?

The authors seem to take it for granted that these three seriously characterologically-challenged people are telling the truth, not *in spite of* the fact that they trash the Gardaí with everything they say about the Gardaí, but *because of it*.

This could have been a sensitive and insightful portrait of a murdered woman and a truly open-minded and objective portrait of the accused. It winds up being the blog of every dishonest would-be snitch and pseudointellectual in West Cork. The honesty and local color are drowned out by sneering social theory and smug, uneducated (or, perhaps, overeducated) assertions about law enforcement, women's issues, social class, upward mobility, xenophobia, and just about anything else a person might find in a Glossary of Socialist Politics.

All the facts they collected, and not one actual, real-world analysis of a one of them. Hours of interviews with grifters and people ashamed of their decent, hardworking families, and only a few minutes of people actually trained to solve cases.

Disappointing.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Kingdom of Speech

  • By: Tom Wolfe
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 4 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 181

Tom Wolfe, whose legend began in journalism, takes us on an eye-opening journey that is sure to arouse widespread debate. The Kingdom of Speech is a captivating, paradigm-shifting argument that speech - not evolution - is responsible for humanity's complex societies and achievements.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Both witty and deep; and brilliantly narrated too.

  • By smarmer on 09-05-16

Tom Wolfe continues to make me feel brilliant...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

...and witty for the duration of any given book of his I'm reading or listening to.

His sense of the intimacy and ultimately understandably-competition-born crawls, leaps, and scurries of history's ideas and movements are convincing in that they render concrete the facts that he has quite thoroughly and with great veridical sensitivity unearthed from the landfills of information about past singular human beings.

One feels that one is there, watching a furtive and despairing Darwin sending Wallace's paper to established members of the Linnean Society, caught between the rock of his less-developed theory and the hard place of his desire to stick to the code of conduct of a gentleman.

This is a history of ideas of the sort that I love: The sort that is an initiation ceremony belonging to the mini Elusinian Mystery Cult of learning for intellectual improvement. One is guided through the narrative by the author, and, based upon the trustworthiness, convincingness, and the storyteller's spellcasting ability of the author, one is brought into a slightly different, slightly better-comprehended world than one inhabited before the final chapter displays for one the truths the author has gleaned from the ceremony/ordeal of writing the book.

For this reason, I love Tom Wolfe.

  • Filled with Force by My Boss

  • By: Karl Cumin
  • Narrated by: Bolton Hill
  • Length: 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

On his first day of work for a new company, Oliver is given a warning about his boss by one of the girls in the office. It seems Mr. Bradley's preference is for younger men. That only gets Oliver's interest though, so when he works late one night and gets an offer of a lift home from the man in question, he jumps at the opportunity. It gets him an invitation for a drink that leads to so much more when the kinky perversions of the older man are unleashed on him.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I'm not sure the author knows

  • By Sarah R. Jacobs on 01-06-18

I'm not sure the author knows

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-18

what a butt plug does. The main character has just had a butt plug in his rectum for about fifteen minutes, but his horny boss is still described as "forcing his butt to open up," and no collapse, clenching, or even winking is mentioned.

  • Shifters in the Night

  • 4 Book Bundle MM Gay PNR & First Time
  • By: Jane Fox
  • Narrated by: Marcus M. Wilde
  • Length: 2 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12

A bulging four book bundle of MM gay shape-shifting goodness. Includes Hunted by Moonlight, Fight the Alpha, Entered by the Dragon, and Mounted by the Alien Demon.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • "Malcolm" and "Elijah"?

  • By Sarah R. Jacobs on 12-07-17

"Malcolm" and "Elijah"?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-17

Are the werewolves supposed to be Nation of Islam? Like Malcolm X and Elijah Muhammad?

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Settling the Score - Part 5: Breaking Point

  • MM Sports Erotica
  • By: Josh Hunter
  • Narrated by: Josh Hunter
  • Length: 1 hr and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23

Coach Davis should be happy. His team is on a winning streak. And his star quarterback, Wade Johnson, has finally learned to shut up and do what he's told. It turns out that all Wade needed was a firm hand...and the threat of blackmail. Now the coach has Wade in a special kind of training. Properly broken and conditioned, Wade is going to be one hell of a player. And an even better sex slave. There's just one problem - Wade is holding on to a secret. Someone else had already given the cocky straight boy a taste for being used and dominated.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ARGH. I have never wanted to smack all

  • By Sarah R. Jacobs on 11-22-17

ARGH. I have never wanted to smack all

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-17

...of the characters in a series this much in my life.

This is like a soap opera that runs on testosterone instead of estrogen.

It's hot and fantastic and funny and campy and MADDENING. I keep trying to stay away but now I totally have to know if a certain character gets his for not acknowledging a certain other character's recognition and reversal.

Also, I want to see the coach eat pavement.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful