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Lauren O.M.

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  • 4
  • helpful votes
  • 3
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  • The White Album

  • By: Joan Didion
  • Narrated by: Susan Varon
  • Length: 7 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 360
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 317
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319

First published in 1979, The White Album records indelibly the upheavals and aftermaths of the 1960s. Examining key events, figures, and trends of the era - including Charles Manson, the Black Panthers, and the shopping mall - through the lens of her own spiritual confusion, Joan Didion helped to define mass culture as we now understand it. Written with a commanding sureness of tone and linguistic precision, The White Album is a central example of American reportage and a classic of American autobiography.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Time Capsule of a Bygone Age

  • By Ian C Robertson on 10-21-15

Oddly Bad

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-18

I really, really wanted to enjoy this book. And listened to the whole darn thing hoping it would somehow turn out that I did. But there were times... many, many times when I couldn’t believe how intensely boring the droning on of this book was. Times when I just wanted to end it and get my refund. I’d actually feel anxiety in my stomach getting so irritated with what I was listening to. Maybe finishing this book makes me a masochist. Fine performance by the narrator though, I’d listen to her voice again.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • On the Road: The Original Scroll

  • By: Jack Kerouac
  • Narrated by: John Ventimiglia
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 282
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 261

Though Jack Kerouac began thinking about the novel that was to become On the Road as early as 1947, it was not until three weeks in April 1951, in an apartment on West 20th Street in Manhattan, that he wrote the first full draft that was satisfactory to him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Classic Brought to Life

  • By yoguinha on 11-25-16

Yes Sir

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-17

I've read the final version, I've watched all the movies and documentaries I can about Jack and the book, so of course this original scroll was fantastic to hear, of course. And what made me purchase something I've already read and researched was the narrator, John Ventimiglia. He makes for a good voice of Jack and I dug the way he handled the rhythms and energies of the story. Done right, yes sir.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Sea Is My Brother

  • By: Jack Kerouac
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

Written seven years before The Town and the City officially launched his writing career, The Sea Is My Brother marks the pivotal point at which Kerouac began laying the foundations for his pioneering method and signature style. The novel chronicles the misadventures of two seamen who at first seem different but are really two sides of the same coin: 27-year-old Wesley Martin, who “loved the sea with a strange, lonely love,” and William Everhart, an assistant professor of English at Columbia College.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • For Kerouac fans

  • By Anthony on 02-17-14

Like A Thrift Store Treasure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-17

Knowing this is Jack before he was officially "Kerouac" gave me the same warm thrills as finding a perfectly scuffed little treasure in a thrift store. I enjoyed every line of this young Jack and noticed the way he wrote himself into every character. Noticed the way he lodged various splinters of his identity, whether present or prophetic, into the lives of any man with a line in this book. Being so young and unseasoned, he might've done this to inflate the imaginary world still lacking his personal evolution. As I said, this is Jack before Kerouac and in that fact alone rests several hours of historical happiness for the Beat nuts of today.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful