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Kim

Spokane, WA, United States
  • 115
  • reviews
  • 967
  • helpful votes
  • 359
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  • 438 Days

  • An Extraordinary True Story of Survival at Sea
  • By: Jonathan Franklin
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 7 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,914
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,755
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,751

438 Days is the miraculous account of the man who survived alone and adrift at sea longer than anyone in recorded history - as told to journalist Jonathan Franklin in dozens of exclusive interviews.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I'M ALIVE..

  • By Big jim Picotto on 12-04-15

No emotion

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-15

This is an amazing true story on a subject matter I like - survival stories are one of my favorite genres - but this selection fell short for me because it lacks in emotional value. I never felt invested in whether or not the main character survived - there was a lot of detail on how he made it through the ordeal but very little about what he was feeling. I wanted some kind of connection with his struggle but wasn't able to find it. The narration was good but a tad dry due to the lack of emotion or drama in the book. It's not bad; just not very good.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • God Is Disappointed in You

  • By: Mark Russell, Shannon Wheeler
  • Narrated by: James Urbaniak
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,457
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,258

God Is Disappointed in You is for people who would like to read the Bible...if it would just cut to the chase. Stripped of its arcane language and interminable passages, every book of the Bible is condensed down to its core message, in no more than a few pages each. Written by Mark Russell with cartoons by New Yorker cartoonist Shannon Wheeler, God Is Disappointed in You is a frequently hilarious, often shocking, but always accurate retelling of the Bible, including the parts selectively left out by Sunday School teachers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not disappointed in this book!

  • By Nicolas Paul Dunbar on 05-28-15

I Would Go to This Church!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-15

If sermons were written like this, churches would be filled to capacity on Sundays! This book reminds me of Lamb (by Christopher Moore) which is one of my all time favorites; I loved the way they condensed the books of the bible into hilarious little chunks that even a heathen like me can understand and appreciate. I can't say it gave me a lot of hope for humanity but my outlook was grim to start with so no harm done there. This should be required reading for non-believers just so they know what it is they are not believing in; I know it certainly educated and entertained me. The narration was perfection times 10 - a match made in heaven (pun totally intended). I give this one 5 stars for making me laugh and think at the same time without realizing it. I will be listening to it again the next time I need an attitude adjustment.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • The Johnstown Flood

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,919
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,238
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,229

At the end of the last century, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was a booming coal-and-steel town filled with hardworking families striving for a piece of the nation's burgeoning industrial prosperity. In the mountains above Johnstown, an old earth dam had been hastily rebuilt to create a lake for an exclusive summer resort patronized by the tycoons of that same industrial prosperity, among them Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Mellon.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A page-turner! HIstory that reads like a novel

  • By Susan K Donley on 06-17-05

An Emotional Drought

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-15

After reading some of the reviews and the summary I thought I was in for a personal glimpse into human tragedy, courage, triumph, etc. in the face of a natural disaster. There was so much potential for this book to really transport the reader into the lives of those who perished or survived the deadly water that overtook Johnstown on that fateful day; but that isn't the case. The book is rich with facts and interesting information about the event and days leading up to it, but the accounts of the survivors are delivered in a documentary fashion and it stops short of offering any human connection - no story within a story here - just straightforward and thorough testimony as remembered by various people. Not horrible - it's way better than anything you would find in a text book; but it was a bit dry.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl with All the Gifts

  • By: M. R. Carey
  • Narrated by: Finty Williams
  • Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,873
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,361
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,368

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr Caldwell calls her "our little genius". Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don't like her. She jokes that she won't bite, but they don't laugh. Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children's cells. She tells her favorite teacher all the things she'll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn't know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hours in, restarted so husband could listen too!

  • By Pikay on 12-13-14

Wrong choice for me

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-15

I don't know what I was thinking when I picked this one; I guess I thought I should give zombie-children another shot since I loved Raising Stony Mayhall so much. I tried to get through this but stopped about halfway through disappointed and went onto something else. I didn't totally hate it so instead of asking for a refund, I decided to relegate it to the bottom of my half-finished pile for now.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • In Cold Blood

  • By: Truman Capote
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 14 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,390
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,591
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,592

Why we think it’s a great listen: It’s a story that most people know, told here in an unforgettable way – an audio masterpiece that rivals the best thrillers, thanks to Capote genre-defining words and Brick’s subtle but powerful characterizations. On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Still the Best

  • By Lisa on 01-10-06

Artistry in Audio

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-15

This incredibly well-produced and narrated audio version of a literary masterpiece is going into my top 10. The story is gruesome and attention-grabbing but the real beauty is in the exploration of every person involved, as well as all of the events leading up to, and following the crime. This one had me riveted enough to leave the TV off for just a little bit longer so I could finish listening to one more chapter - that is extremely rare for me. My opinion is 5 stars without a doubt.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • What's So Funny?

  • My Hilarious Life
  • By: Tim Conway, Jane Scovell, Carol Burnett
  • Narrated by: Tim Conway, Carol Burnett, Dick Hill, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,380
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,251
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,246

Six-time Emmy Award-winning funnyman Tim Conway, best known for his characters on The Carol Burnett Show, offers a straight-shooting and hilarious memoir about his life on stage and off as an actor and comedian. In television history, few entertainers have captured as many hearts and made as many people laugh as Tim Conway. There's nothing in the world that Tim Conway would rather do than entertain - and in his first-ever memoir, What's So Funny?, that's exactly what he does.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tim, that is what's so funny!!!

  • By Kindle Customer on 03-05-14

Sweet and Funny

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-28-14

I always loved watching Tim Conway on the Carol Burnett Show and in all those Disney movies from my childhood. This book reveals that he is just as adorable in real life as he is on the screen. If you're looking for scandal or dirty secrets then you'll be disappointed - the man doesn't have any skeletons in his closet. Instead you'll find some entertaining stories and touching sentiments; I'm not big on heartwarming squishy stuff - but it couldn't be anything else considering the subject matter so I have to give it 4 stars.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Android's Dream

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,300
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,452
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,449

A human diplomat creates an interstellar incident when he kills an alien diplomat in a most unusual way. To avoid war, Earth's government must find an equally unusual object: A type of sheep ("The Android's Dream"), used in the alien race's coronation ceremony. To find the sheep, the government turns to Harry Creek, ex-cop, war hero and hacker extraordinaire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Philip K Dick meets Douglas Adams

  • By James on 07-26-11

Freaky Fun in Outerspace

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-14

Wil Wheaton is fantastic as a narrator - his performance alone brings the overall score of this book up to 4 stars. He is the perfect match to John Scalzi's cleverly written comedic action-adventure. This is the kind of book that plays in your brain like a movie - I could easily see this being turned into a script and put on the big screen. The story moves fast and the characters are easy to like - snarky, intelligent, and just plain fun. I really like this lighter version of sci-fi that doesn't require one to have a degree from MIT to follow - I'm sure it breaks a million scientific laws but to me it sounds all perfectly plausible and gets me excited for a future where I could have a monster sidekick to pal around with and to eat annoying people for me. This one is Spaceballs on crack - enjoy!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Son

  • By: Philipp Meyer
  • Narrated by: Will Patton, Kate Mulgrew, Scott Shepherd, and others
  • Length: 17 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,226
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,836
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,841

Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching examination of the bloody price of power, The Son is a gripping and utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American west with rare emotional acuity, even as it presents an intimate portrait of one family across two centuries. Eli McCullough is just twelve-years-old when a marauding band of Comanche storm his Texas homestead and brutally murder his mother and sister, taking him as a captive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Five Stars for the Lone Star, The Son, & Meyer

  • By Mel on 06-04-13

Engaging... but brutal

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-14

I went into this one craving a historical epic - a tale of the American west with cowboys and native Americans; the struggles and hard-won victories that took place on the fringes of civilized life. I was not disappointed - this book gave me all of that and added in a level of brutality and harsh humanity I wasn't expecting. The first chapters were difficult to listen to, in that the suffering of children always seems to get to me more than anything else. The disjointed way the chapters are laid out - each being entries in the diaries of various characters scattered around during completely different decades - made it hard to follow. I think hearing 3 or 4 chapters in a row from the same person might have been better for me. It took over half the book to figure out how some of them were related to each other and there seemed to be so many holes that never really get filled in at the end. That being said, I did find myself looking forward to listening and ended up enjoying it overall. I would recommend this to anyone looking for an old-westy kind of story but keep in mind that you will hear some pretty vicious stuff about the way people treated each other back when America was still becoming a country. And if you are prone to being upset about the portrayal of white people, native Americans, or Mexican people back in the 1800's to early 1900's then be forewarned that you could find this book controversial.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • SuperFreakonomics

  • By: Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
  • Narrated by: Stephen J. Dubner
  • Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,782
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,913
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,930

SuperFreakonomics challenges the way we think all over again, exploring the hidden side of everything with such questions as: How is a street prostitute like a department-store Santa? What do hurricanes, heart attacks, and highway deaths have in common? Can eating kangaroo save the planet? Levitt and Dubner mix smart thinking and great storytelling like no one else.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Worth Your Time

  • By Rich on 01-04-10

It's good to freak out sometimes

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-14

As a fan of the weekly Freakanomics podcast, I came into this with a good idea of what to expect - which means the joy of surprise and enchantment a first-time listener may experience was bound to be elude me. I was right about that - nothing super earth-shaking for me, however my expectations were more than met and I really enjoyed this sequel to Freakanomics. These guys are just plain awesome and their mass appeal is obvious; I would recommend this for group car rides where you want everyone to think a little bit, discuss a little bit, laugh, and enjoy an escape from superficial assumptions about the world we live in. This would also be great for someone looking to increase their stash of interesting conversation starters for parties or awkward first dates (you may want to avoid the patriotic prostitutes though).

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Serpent of Venice

  • A Novel
  • By: Christopher Moore
  • Narrated by: Euan Morton
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,386
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,168
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,166

Venice, a really long time ago: Three prominent Venetians await their most loathsome and foul dinner guest, the erstwhile envoy from Britain who also happens to be a favorite of the Doge: The rascal-Fool Pocket. This trio of cunning plotters have lured Pocket to a dark dungeon, promising a spirited evening. Their invitation is, of course, bogus. These scoundrels have something far less amusing planned for the man who has consistently foiled their quest for power and wealth. But this Fool is no fool.…

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Shakespear, E.A. Poe, and Pocket the Fool

  • By Sires on 05-11-14

The Fool Returns....to Applause!!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-14

Oh joyous delight!! The return of our beloved "Fool" aka "Pocket" ready to wreak havoc and run amok once again! For fans of "Fool" - you will love the deliciously salty language and abundant sexual innuendo woven throughout this tale of love and betrayal. I have not read The Merchant of Venice (yes, I know - for shame..) but it's so much better from the literary genius that is Christopher Moore - perhaps our generation's Shakespeare - after all, wasn't he thought to be quite edgy-bordering-on-vulgar back in his day? Anyway, for new readers - dive right in - you don't have to know much about the other book to enjoy it - all you need is a love for inappropriate humor, saucy characters, and tragedy perfected. I didn't give it 5 stars across the board because I did like Fool a little bit better and I reserve all 5's for only a select few. That said, I forgot to mention the narrator who needs to be nominated for an award - he IS Pocket - the performance is seamless and the production is fantastic. Great audio book - 4.5 stars.

15 of 16 people found this review helpful