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David Arnett

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  • reviews
  • 35
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  • Murder Must Advertise (Dramatized)

  • By: Dorothy L. Sayers
  • Narrated by: Ian Carmichael, Full Cast
  • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 243
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 168
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161

When copywriter Victor Dean falls to his death on the stairs of Pym's Advertising Agency, everyone assumes it was an unfortunate accident. His replacement doesn't think so and begins asking a lot of questions. The new man is something of a mystery to his colleagues, and he certainly dresses well considering his meagre writer's salary.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Abridging books is like amputation.

  • By Ellenaeddy on 05-15-12

Sayers is great, but Carmichael and cast are not.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-17

Is there anything you would change about this book?

No.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Murder Must Advertise (Dramatized)?

It was almost uniformly bland, compared to the book. Carmichael was better as a reader in other Sayers novels.

What didn’t you like about Ian Carmichael and Full Cast ’s performance?

It was not plausible, and the acting was stilted. The book was so much better; the performance was clipped and too thin as well.

Did Murder Must Advertise (Dramatized) inspire you to do anything?

To avoid Ian Carmichael full cast performances.

  • The Late Scholar

  • The Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet, Book 4
  • By: Jill Paton Walsh
  • Narrated by: Matthew Brenher
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 274
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 232
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 234

When a dispute among the fellows of St. Severin's College, Oxford University, reaches a stalemate, Lord Peter Wimsey discovers that as the Duke of Denver he is "the Visitor" - charged with the task of resolving the issue. It is time for Lord Peter and his detective novelist wife Harriet to revisit their beloved Oxford, where their long and literate courtship finally culminated in their engagement and marriage.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This reader is very difficult to listen to.

  • By Joan on 08-11-15

Poor narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-17

What did you love best about The Late Scholar?

Patton catches some of the spirit of Sayers.

What did you like best about this story?

Again, Patton catches some of the spirit of Sayers.

What didn’t you like about Matthew Brenher’s performance?

Brenher has a really poor sense of rhythm and timing in reading a text. He often falls into a monotonic set of bursts of a half-dozen words at a time, regardless of what the text means. The story compensates for the poor narration, but only partially.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

An interesting imitation of Dorothy Sayers.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Pride and Prejudice

  • By: Jane Austen
  • Narrated by: Rosamund Pike
  • Length: 11 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12,097
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11,044
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 10,995

One of Jane Austen’s most beloved works, Pride and Prejudice, is vividly brought to life by Academy Award nominee Rosamund Pike ( Gone Girl). In her bright and energetic performance of this British classic, she expertly captures Austen’s signature wit and tone. Her attention to detail, her literary background, and her performance in the 2005 feature film version of the novel provide the perfect foundation from which to convey the story of Elizabeth Bennett, her four sisters, and the inimitable Mr. Darcy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Truth Universally Acknowledged

  • By Gretchen SLP on 12-10-15

An exceptional narration of a great novel.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-15

If you could sum up Pride and Prejudice in three words, what would they be?

Character, manners, and folly.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Elizabeth Bennet is the story.

What about Rosamund Pike’s performance did you like?

She gives a lively and nuanced reading, showing a well-known story in a fresh aspect.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, but I forced myself to go slower and enjoy the details.

Any additional comments?

I am familiar with P&P, and have the Lindsay Duncan performance, which I like, and had thought was the best available. Now I believe the Rosamund Pike narration is even better, more lively, subtle and interesting.

20 of 23 people found this review helpful

  • The Caves of Steel

  • Robot, Book 1
  • By: Isaac Asimov
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 7 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,988
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,987

A millennium into the future two advancements have altered the course of human history: the colonization of the galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. Isaac Asimov's Robot novels chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together. Like most people left behind on an over-populated Earth, New York City police detective Elijah Baley had little love for either the arrogant Spacers or their robotic companions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sci-Fi Mystery at its Best!

  • By HL on 09-16-14

It is difficult to catch the wonder of a classic.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-14

Would you consider the audio edition of The Caves of Steel to be better than the print version?

The audio version is almost as good as I remember from my first reading the original when a teenager.

What did you like best about this story?

The best of the story is the extrapolation from 1953 to what might be. Mostly with success, but some of the failures are even more interesting. Asimov has the trend but some details seem strange to us now, and lest we become complacent we should reflect that the future technology of a single decade will very likely make our own "newest thing" seem dated. Asimov did not get bogged down in the small details but focused on some big questions.

Which scene was your favorite?

Too many to name, but all feature the uncertain boundary between biological and electronic ("positronic") intelligence (AI). If a machine can appear human, what is a human other than a biological machine? This is close to Alan Turing's problem. How do we humans put the spirit into the machine? Is it possible? Does R. Daneel have a spirit? What do we mean by "spirit"? These are hard and interesting questions.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No, it is an old favorite of mine, and I like to savor it bit by bit. I think there is much content here.

Any additional comments?

The performance of Jessie was unexpectedly good for a male narrator. Asimov's notion of artificial intelligence was brilliant for the time in which The Caves of Steel was written. We are still working on that hard problem, and may need many more creative ideas before we solve it! The (undeserved) hatred of the Spacers may be seen to have an unfortunately large variety of present day implications.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful