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Hayyamini

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  • The Wise Man's Fear

  • Kingkiller Chronicles, Day 2
  • By: Patrick Rothfuss
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 42 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 48,358
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 43,972
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 44,023

"My name is Kvothe. I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well worth your time

  • By Robert on 09-08-11

Too much Kvothe?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-01-18

Since this is based on the audiobook, I probably have names misspelled.
Rothfuss is an exceptionally gifted storyteller, and his use of language, metaphor, and motifs is brilliant. Thus, I can see why so many people love his books. My negative review will be a minority report. Here are things I dislike about this book and the one that precedes it. Some spoilers here.
1) Just one stupid thing after another. Kvothe is highly intelligent and mature beyond his years, but to move the story forward, he has to do one stupid thing after another. Other people, too, have to be stupid. When it is Kvothe, you can tell it is coming, and you tense up thinking, “OK, now he is going to do something really stupid, and it will go badly for him.” Example: breaking into Ambrose’s room. Example, blurting out to the mayor that his (the mayor’s) new and beloved wife probably had an affair with a mummer, and that is why she hates them. Also, from vol. 1, how does the librarian not know that Ambrose set up Kvothe to take a candle in the library? How can he let Ambrose keep his job? A narrative shouldn’t constantly rely on people, especially the hero, doing or saying stupid things.
2) That woman. Kvothe’s devotion to Denna makes no sense at all. No 16 year-old would maintain that kind of devotion to a girl whom he only rarely sees, who is constantly with other men, who constantly disappears, and who weirdly wants to keep him close/not close. She is clearly messed-up, and Kvothe (as he is presented in the narrative) would see that and run away for the sake of his own mental health. Kvothe constantly but correctly remarks that if he shows real affection for her, she’ll just run away. Why mess with that? Worst of all is how she keeps showing up like a bad penny. No matter where he goes in the world, there she is! I found myself rolling my eyes when she abruptly appears in some foreign city and thinking, “Why can’t she just die?” There are several women in the story about whom I think, “She could be a good match for him,” but never Denna. There is no romantic tension because I can’t see why he keeps pining for her.
3) Unbelievable. Elements of the story stretch credibility too much, and I am not talking about the magic. For example, a small group of thugs successfully pass themselves off as a troop of professional musicians (Can you pick up playing the lute and pipes in an afternoon?). They kidnap two girls, and successfully escape a town of angry people in a couple of wagons, having beaten back the whole posse. And they think they can go from town to town doing this, supposing news of it won’t spread. But worst of all is Ademre, a fascist, xenophobic, matriarchal society that prospers by sending out its invincible mercenaries to other lands. The people, when not training, have constant promiscuous sex but the women almost never get pregnant and no one ever gets an STD (STDs do exist in this fictional world, so it is not because it isn’t there). The people actually think that sex has nothing to do with pregnancy, but that women just sometimes spontaneously bear a child; they have no word for “father.” The whole society is unrealistic, and their unbeatable combat skills bears no relationship to how actual fighting works.
4) Too much Kvothe. Almost all the story is 1st person, and even when it is 3rd person, Kvothe is in almost every scene. It is a relief to final have a bit of narration where is is not there. Kvothe’s stupid things just make you get tired of him. That is not a good thing for an epic where he is on every page.

  • The Legion of Flame

  • By: Anthony Ryan
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 25 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 650
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 613
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 611

For centuries the vast Ironship Trading Syndicate relied on drake blood - and the extraordinary powers it confers to those known as the Blood-blessed - to fuel and protect its empire. But now a fearsome power has arisen - a drake so mighty that the world will tremble before it. Rogue Blood-blessed Claydon Torcreek, Syndicate agent Lizanne Lethridge, and ironship captain Corrick Hilemore embark upon perilous quests to chase down clues that offer faint hopes of salvation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good continuation of the series

  • By Isobel on 07-13-17

Clean up your language!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-17

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No. The language is so bad I'd be embarrassed to do so.

What other book might you compare The Legion of Flame to and why?

It is very similar to Ryan's Blood Song trilogy. A number of the characters and tropes are almost identical. I don't mind that, since I liked the trilogy, but if you have read about Blood Song, you'll experience deja vu.

Have you listened to any of Steve West’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

The performance was great. I don't understand why some criticized him.

Any additional comments?

The language in Ryan's writing has gotten to be atrocious. Constant gutter profanity. Yes, I understand that career criminals use bad words, but I don't need to hear that to know that these are bad people. It is especially irksome when you hear it in an audible book, shouted in your ear. We listen for entertainment, and that language is not entertaining. It's a shame, because Ryan really is a good writer with interesting concepts. In this book, he develops counterparts to the British East India Company, Tsarist Russia, Bolsheviks, etc., and one can see metaphor in the dragons and their uprising. All would make for a thoughtful book if you are not always having to deal with the constant profanity assaulting your ears.

  • The Black Prism

  • By: Brent Weeks
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 21 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,121
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,734
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,720

Gavin Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserve a tenuous peace. But Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live: five years to achieve five impossible goals. But when Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he's willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • original and entertaining

  • By LornaDavis on 09-19-16

Good story and narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-16

I like the fantasy genre but some of the writing is somewhat amateurish. Not so with this book. Careful attention to the writing craft and a good story.

  • Stealing Sorcery

  • The War of Broken Mirrors, Book 2
  • By: Andrew Rowe
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 16 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,777
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,610
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,602

The immortal sorcerers - three legendary figures that toppled the empire of Xixis. Each has lived for over a hundred years, leaving a powerful legacy in their wake. But their children do not share their renowned immortality, and when the firstborn son of Edrick Theas is killed, sorceress Lydia Hastings is called to investigate the murder. When she discovers a sorcerous trail left by a creature of unfathomable power, she quickly realizes she needs outside help.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Improvement

  • By Jonathan on 09-04-16

Story ok, but be aware

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-16

There is a great deal of profanity in this, unlike the first volume. Also, the female characters are all honorary men. It would be nice if writers could have strong women without turning them into men.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Blight of Muirwood

  • Legends of Muirwood, Book 2
  • By: Jeff Wheeler
  • Narrated by: Kate Rudd
  • Length: 13 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,749
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,562
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,567

Rising from her humble beginnings as a lost orphan, Lia is summoned to be Muirwood Abbey’s protector and special guardian for Ellowyn Demont, the lost heir of the fallen kingdom of Pry-Ree. After the death of the ruthless king at the battle of Winterrowd, the great Aldermaston and Abbey leader calls on Lia to use her mystical talents to save Muirwood from two new threats - a vengeful queen accusing the Abbey of her husband’s death and a deadly plague threatening to destroy the land.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Totally ADDICTED

  • By TammySue on 10-05-16

Weak heroine

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-16

A good story frustrated by a weak heroine. Story ever giving long expositions of her emotional reactions and thoughts. She cries constantly, and pathetically pines for a man who treats her like a dishrag. Same basic story could have been made much better if she had a little more toughness in dealing with emotional issues. As it is, you just want to throttle her and yell, "Show a little backbone, will ya?"

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Bands of Mourning

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 14 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13,328
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,382
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,351

The Bands of Mourning are the mythical metalminds owned by the Lord Ruler, said to grant anyone who wears them the powers that the Lord Ruler had at his command. Hardly anyone thinks they really exist. A kandra researcher has returned to Elendel with images that seem to depict the Bands as well as writings in a language that no one can read. Waxillium Ladrian is recruited to travel south to the city of New Seran to investigate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wax and Wayne are Back!!!

  • By Don Gilbert on 01-28-16

Another good story, but with major plot holes

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-16

What made the experience of listening to The Bands of Mourning the most enjoyable?

Interesting characters, good narration

What about Michael Kramer’s performance did you like?

He does voices very well

Any additional comments?

Overall good, but one major character's actions make no sense. Also, at an important point, it seriously violates the laws of physics (even taking into account the nature of the fictional world). This makes the story less plausible and thus less satisfactory.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Jurassic Park

  • A Novel
  • By: Michael Crichton
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 15 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,666
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,283
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,270

Audie Award, Science Fiction, 2016. An astonishing technique for recovering and cloning dinosaur DNA has been discovered. Now humankind's most thrilling fantasies have come true. Creatures extinct for eons roam Jurassic Park with their awesome presence and profound mystery, and all the world can visit them - for a price.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • CHAOS THEORY

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 01-30-16

Unbelievably preachy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-15

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

The story is fairly good except when one of the characters makes a long, preachy speech. The mathematician Malcolm makes a lot of these.

Would you be willing to try another book from Michael Crichton? Why or why not?

Probably not.

What about Scott Brick’s performance did you like?

Good dramatic voice

Was Jurassic Park worth the listening time?

5 out of 10

2 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Early Middle Ages

  • By: Philip Daileader, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Philip Daileader
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,140
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,020
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,015

The Early Middle Ages-the years from A.D. 650 to 1000-were crucial to Europe's future social and political development. These 24 lectures trace a journey from Scandinavia across northern and central Europe to the farthest reaches of the Byzantine and Islamic empires, providing an exciting new look an era often simply called the "Dark Ages."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing Look at the Transition to the Middle Ages!

  • By Mike on 07-03-14

Great course!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-15

Great overview of early Middle Ages and cultural changes. The professor is outstanding. A good deal of variety in topics.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Conspirata

  • A Novel of Ancient Rome
  • By: Robert Harris
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 14 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,261
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 816
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 812

On the eve of Marcus Cicero's inauguration as consul of Rome, the grisly death of a boy sends ripples of fear through a city already wracked by civil unrest, crime, and debauchery of every kind. Felled by a hammer, his throat slit and his organs removed, the young slave appears to have been offered as a human sacrifice, forbidden as an abomination in the Roman Republic. For Cicero, the ill forebodings of this hideous murder only increase his frustrations and the dangers he already faces as Rome's leader.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable Read

  • By David on 04-29-10

Brilliant, Intelligent, Literate

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-10

This is everything an audiobook should be. It has a great story, an intelligent text, and a superb narration. If your idea of a story from the ancient world is something like "300," with morons screaming out monosyllables while they swing swords right and left, you may be bored. But if you are a grown-up, you'll love it.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Fierce Conversations

  • Achieving Success at Work & in Life, One Conversation at a Time
  • By: Susan Scott
  • Narrated by: Susan Scott
  • Length: 5 hrs and 9 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 562
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 393
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 388

Fierce Conversations is the master guidebook to transforming the conversations that are central to your success, offering a new way of relating to people - at work, at home, and in every area of your life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Took a while, but Scott eventually delivered

  • By Mary Beth Harris on 03-06-13

Deadly dull

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-09

I don't know how good the author is at conversations, but the book is unbearable.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful