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  • No Excuses: Existentialism and the Meaning of Life

  • By: Robert C. Solomon, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert C. Solomon
  • Length: 12 hrs and 7 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,306
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,115

What is life? What is my place in it? What choices do these questions obligate me to make? More than a half-century after it burst upon the intellectual scene - with roots that extend to the mid-19th century - Existentialism's quest to answer these most fundamental questions of individual responsibility, morality, and personal freedom, life has continued to exert a profound attraction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good for even a non-existentialist

  • By Gary on 07-24-15

essential analysis of existential ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-18

skilled lecturer presents the primary figures of the movement in context with their individual perspectives and works.

  • The Square and the Tower

  • Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook
  • By: Niall Ferguson
  • Narrated by: Elliot Hill
  • Length: 17 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 617
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 543
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 540

Most history is hierarchical: it's about emperors, presidents, prime ministers, and field marshals. It's about states, armies, and corporations. It's about orders from on high. Even history "from below" is often about trade unions and workers' parties. But what if that's simply because hierarchical institutions create the archives that historians rely on? What if we are missing the informal, less well documented social networks that are the true sources of power and drivers of change?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Power? Does it come from hierarchies or networks?

  • By Ted on 04-25-18

Ferguson's unique perspective of world history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-18

As Ferguson states, this is an honest (and, IMO, successful) attempt to reclaim the framing of world history as the result of big men and bigger institutions from that told by conspiracy theorists to those with rational perspective. An expertly narrated and well told enjoyable read.

20 of 22 people found this review helpful