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Cathryn

Roanoke, TX, United States
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 44
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  • The Wright Brothers

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: David McCullough
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,346
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,359
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,342

Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize David McCullough tells the dramatic story behind the story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly: Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Wilbur and Orville Wright's Wright Flyer became the first powered, heavier-than-air machine to achieve controlled, sustained flight with a pilot aboard. The Age of Flight had begun. How did they do it? And why?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story but narration is a little boring

  • By Vince on 08-20-15

Interesting story ruined by narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-16

The story was interesting, well paced, and informative. But the narration was boring and hard to listen to. I would recommend reading this book, but not the audio version.

  • Romancing Miss Bronte

  • A Novel
  • By: Juliet Gael
  • Narrated by: Rosalyn Landor
  • Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

In this astonishing novel, a brilliant mélange of fact and fiction, Juliet Gael skillfully and stylishly captures the passions, hopes, dreams, and sorrows of literature’s most famous sisters—and imagines how love dramatically and most unexpectedly found Charlotte Brontë.

During the two years that she studied in Brussels, Charlotte had a taste of life’s splendors—travel, literature, and art. Now, back home in the Yorkshire moors, duty-bound to a blind father and an alcoholic brother, an ambitious Charlotte refuses to sink into hopelessness. With her sisters, Emily and Anne, Charlotte conceives a plan to earn money and pursue a dream: The Brontës will publish. In childhood the Brontë children created fantastical imaginary worlds; now the sisters craft novels quite unlike anything written before. Transforming her loneliness and personal sorrow into a triumph of literary art, Charlotte pens her 1847 masterpiece, Jane Eyre.

Charlotte’s novel becomes an overwhelming literary success, catapulting the shy and awkward young woman into the spotlight of London’s fashionable literary scene—and into the arms of her new publisher, George Smith, an irresistibly handsome young man whose interest in his fiercely intelligent and spirited new author seems to go beyond professional duty. But just as life begins to hold new promise, unspeakable tragedy descends on the Brontë household, throwing London and George into the background and leaving Charlotte to fear that the only romance she will ever find is at the tip of her pen.
 
But another man waits in the Brontës’ Haworth parsonage—the quiet but determined curate Arthur Nicholls. After secretly pining for Charlotte since he first came to work for her father, Arthur suddenly reveals his heart to her.

Romancing Miss Brontë is a fascinating portrayal of an extraordinary woman whose life and work articulated our deepest human longing: to love and be loved in return.
 


From the Hardcover edition.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love this book

  • By Eric on 09-05-10

Love Rosalyn Landor

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-15

The story was interesting, but I could listen to anything narrated by Rosalyn Landor. I didn't know much about the Brontes' lives, so I enjoyed learning this sad story.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How Doctors Think

  • By: Jerome Groopman M.D.
  • Narrated by: Michael Prichard
  • Length: 10 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 576
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 259
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 259

On average, a physician will interrupt a patient describing her symptoms within 12 seconds. In that short time, many doctors decide on the likely diagnosis and best treatment. Often, decisions made this way are correct, but at crucial moments they can also be wrong: with catastrophic consequences. In this myth-shattering book, Jerome Groopman pinpoints the forces and thought processes behind the decisions doctors make.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By Audiophile on 05-13-07

Odd narration, good book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-15

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I thought the writing was good and the content was very interesting. Many of the cognitive issues addressed apply to areas of life other than medicine, so I think I will be able to apply some of the lessons from this book, even though I am not a doctor. It will probably make me a better patient, too.

What didn’t you like about Michael Prichard’s performance?

His voice sounded like a 1950's TV doctor. It was a bit jarring at first, especially in contrast to the content of the book. If I revisit this book, I will probably switch to reading it, rather than listening.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Demon Under The Microscope

  • By: Thomas Hager
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 12 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,965
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,115
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,114

The Nazis discovered it. The Allies won the war with it. It conquered diseases, changed laws, and single-handedly launched the era of antibiotics. This incredible discovery was sulfa, the first antibiotic medication. In The Demon Under the Microscope, Thomas Hager chronicles the dramatic history of the drug that shaped modern medicine.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fantastic book

  • By Sara on 09-02-08

Interesting History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-15

Would you listen to The Demon Under The Microscope again? Why?

Yes. There is a lot of interesting history, and I think a second listen would help me to remember more.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The story was fascinating in the way that it connected the history of sulfa drugs with the surrounding geo-political environment.

What about Stephen Hoye’s performance did you like?

He was easy to understand. The pacing and inflection were appropriate to the story.

  • The Morning Read from The Wall Street Journal, September 24, 2015

  • By: The Wall Street Journal
  • Narrated by: The Wall Street Journal
  • Length: 44 mins
  • Highlights
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3

Here's a creative way to make the best use of your morning commute: listen to The Wall Street Journal. Each morning, you'll get the must-hear stories from the Journal's front page, as well as the most popular columns and briefings from Marketplace, Money & Investing, and more. And, every Friday, you'll get a bonus delivery: features, columns, and reviews from the Weekend Journal.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Please bring back What's News

  • By Cathryn on 09-25-15

Please bring back What's News

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-15

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I'm slowly getting used to the new narration, although it still isn't great. However, the start of the read is much too abrupt. Please bring back the "What's News" column at the beginning and the summary of which articles will be included in the read.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Morning Read from The Wall Street Journal, September 24, 2015?

The abrupt intro and exit are the things that I notice most.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of The Wall Street Journal?

The old narrator.

Was The Morning Read from The Wall Street Journal, September 24, 2015 worth the listening time?

Yes, but I get so much more out of it with the "What's News" column and the introduction listing the articles to be included.

Any additional comments?

The "What's News" column is one of the great features of the Wall Street Journal. Please don't skip this important part of the broadcast.

  • Why We Get Fat

  • And What to Do About It
  • By: Gary Taubes
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,714
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,643
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,582

Building upon this critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim, Taubes now revisits the urgent question of what's making us fat - and how we can change - in this exciting new book. Persuasive, straightforward, and practical, Why We Get Fat makes Taubes' crucial argument newly accessible to a wider audience.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eye opening, life changing book!

  • By Marsha on 02-03-11

Informative and Educational

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-19-12

Would you listen to Why We Get Fat again? Why?

Yes, I would listen again. The science explained is quite detailed, and a second listen might help to cement the facts.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

The science behind the author's argument that carbohydrates are the primary cause of fat gain was by far the most detailed that I have encountered. The book was obviously well researched. The dense detail did not overwhelm the main points of the book but provided compelling background information.

I found that the piece of information that struck home most with me is the author's assertion that exercise is not very effective for fat loss, but that it is very effective for the prevention of fat gain. My own frequent exercise seems to support this idea, which means that dietary choices (the harder aspects for me) are the main drivers of fat loss. However, I felt inspired rather than discouraged by this book.

What does Mike Chamberlain bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Clear dictation and a steady pace help to make all of the detailed scientific facts remain clear.