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  • 37
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  • 291
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  • The Last Days of Night

  • A Novel
  • By: Graham Moore
  • Narrated by: Johnathan McClain
  • Length: 13 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,467
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,214
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,195

New York, 1888. Gas lamps still flicker in the city streets, but the miracle of electric light is in its infancy. The person who controls the means to turn night into day will make history - and a vast fortune. A young untested lawyer named Paul Cravath, fresh out of Columbia Law School, takes a case that seems impossible to win. Paul's client, George Westinghouse, has been sued by Thomas Edison over a billion-dollar question: Who invented the lightbulb and holds the right to power the country?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Favorite book of 2016

  • By Taryn on 12-19-16

Entertaining and instructive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-17

An appendix (wait to hear it until it comes in the end) explains very well the relation between the novel and historical events, a question that troubled me while reading. So enjoy the ride. The novel is hard to turn off and it have me a new appreciation of electricity.
Highly recommended.

  • The Advocate's Daughter

  • A Thriller
  • By: Anthony Franze
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 9 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,089
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 992
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 982

A Washington, DC, lawyer and a frequent major media commentator on the Supreme Court, Anthony Franze delivers a high-stakes story of family, power, loss, and revenge set within the insular world of the highest court of our country. Among Washington, DC, power players, everyone has secrets they desperately want to keep hidden, including Sean Serrat, a Supreme Court lawyer. Sean transformed his misspent youth into a model adulthood and now has one of the most respected legal careers in the country.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Many thanks...

  • By shelley on 01-12-18

Ridiculous

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-29-16

This is an entertaining book, but wildly unbelievable. Knowing the Supreme Court, I was curious about the story, but I found it so absurd that it was more irritating than fun.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of the Lost Child

  • The Neapolitan Novels, Book 4
  • By: Elena Ferrante
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 18 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,974
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,776
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,777

Here is the dazzling saga of two women: the brilliant, bookish Elena and the fiery, uncontainable Lila. Both are now adults; many of life's great discoveries have been made, its vagaries and losses have been suffered. Through it all, the women's friendship has remained the gravitational center of their lives. Both women once fought to escape the neighborhood in which they grew up - a prison of conformity, violence, and inviolable taboos.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible Series

  • By Pamela on 10-15-15

Happy to finish it

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-15

Because I found it dreadfully depressing. The narrator has become shallow, envious, resentful, and has no compassion or real friendship. The series started out splendidly, but I should have stopped after volume two...

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay

  • The Neapolitan Novels, Book 3
  • By: Elena Ferrante
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 16 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,054
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,848
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,845

In this third Neapolitan novel, Elena and Lila, the two girls whom were first introduced in My Brilliant Friend, have become women. Lila married at sixteen and has a young son; she has left her husband and the comforts her marriage brought and now works as a common laborer. Elena has left the neighborhood, earned her college degree, and published a successful novel, all of which has opened the doors to a world of learned interlocutors and richly furnished salons.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • DOING AND THINKING

  • By CHET YARBROUGH on 07-30-15

Can't relate

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-15

The main character of this novel and narrator has lost my interest. She whines and obsesses, and her relation with her friends and family has gotten more inexplicable. I hope the tetralogy recovers in the fourth novel the candor, compassion, and narrative spark it had in volume one, which I found masterful.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of a New Name

  • The Neapolitan Novels, Book 2
  • By: Elena Ferrante
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 19 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,624
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,361
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,354

The Story of a New Name follows Elena Ferrante's critically acclaimed My Brilliant Friend, featuring Lila and Elena. The two protagonists are now in their 20s, and marriage appears to have imprisoned Lila. Meanwhile Elena continues her journey of self-discovery.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Still hooked

  • By HWL on 07-07-15

Still engaging

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-15

The neighborhood is still alive and engaging. The friendships and families make for good gossip and the narrator can be a fine describer of envy, jealousy, tension, and desire. I found this book less attractive than the first one, though. The narrator has a bitter and even nasty view of many other characters. The fabled friend she so much admires is mostly described as admirable, but not shown to be so. Why the narrator can't enjoy what is good in her life is understandable, but irritating to me. I feel like asking her to grow up. Her fascination with Nino is quite inexplicable. And yet, many scenes are unforgettable, and the description of the political unrest at the time in Italy is lightly but effectively done.

  • My Brilliant Friend

  • The Neapolitan Novels, Book 1
  • By: Elena Ferrante
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,544
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,978
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,965

A modern masterpiece from one of Italy's most acclaimed authors, My Brilliant Friend is a rich, intense, and generous-hearted story about two friends, Elena and Lila, who represent the story of a nation and the nature of friendship.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Parte Uno Dei Quattro--It's Worth it to Keep Goin'

  • By W Perry Hall on 09-14-16

Amazing, engaging, moving

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-15

I found this story of two friends in a Neopolitan neighborhood vivid, fascinating, and beautifully done. As in Proust, the adventures are quotidian and the pace is slow, but the book brings to life a place and time that felt very real to me, thoughfully and even lovingly recreated, in spite of telling about the pain of growing up in a relatively poor part of town. I read and listen to many novels, and this for me was one of the best I have heard. I already have given the novel as a gift to three people... I heard it in English and in Italian. The Italian is clearly superior, sparkling and more full of emotion, but the English version works our fine, toning down what could appear melodramatic in English and is perfectly natural in Italian. It may not be your cup of tea, but if it is (and chances are high it may be), I am sure you will love it, as I have and many, many readers around the world.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • A Prayer for Owen Meany

  • By: John Irving
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 27 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,793
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,399
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,403

Of all of John Irving's books, this is the one that lends itself best to audio. In print, Owen Meany's dialogue is set in capital letters; for this production, Irving himself selected Joe Barrett to deliver Meany's difficult voice as intended. In the summer of 1953, two 11-year-old boys – best friends – are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary and terrifying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Painfully nostalgic

  • By Barry on 07-29-15

Disappointed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-25-14

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

No, except for a few very funny moments. The main story, with its religious tone, did not engage me.

What could John Irving have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Preach less.

Have you listened to any of Joe Barrett’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No.

Any additional comments?

The reader, who in general is very good, has to "reproduce" Owen Meany's shrill voice, and this did not sound convincing to me.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Let Your Life Speak

  • Listening for the Voice of Vocation
  • By: Parker J. Palmer
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
  • Length: 2 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 501
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 424
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 426

Finding one's calling is not just about finding something we can do - it is about finding what we can't not do. "Let your life speak" is a time-honored Quaker admonition to live one's life as witness to the deepest truths one knows. But as Parker Palmer explains, those words can also mean "listen to your life, and let it tell you what your truth is."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Deep Wisdom in these pages

  • By Julia Davis Coffey on 01-30-11

More depressing than inspiring...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-12

Perhaps because of the tone of the narrator I did not find this story about finding one's vocation especially compelling or helpful.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Guards! Guards!

  • Discworld #8
  • By: Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Nigel Planer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,748
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,649
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3,643

"Where have all the dragons gone?" Explore the crazy, creepy land called Discworld, where you'll discover that the dragons aren't asleep or dead - they're dormant, packed in like huge, scaly sardines.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best satire available

  • By Glen Phipps on 04-27-07

Great fun!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-11

This was a completely unexpected treat, since I knew nothing about this series. The book is deliciously goofy and the reading is stellar.

  • Nocturnes

  • Five Stories of Music and Nightfall
  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall, Kirby Heyborne, Lincoln Hoppe, and others
  • Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 93
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 62

An exploration of love, need, and the ineluctable force of the past, Nocturnes reveals these individuals to us with extraordinary precision and subtlety, and with the arresting psychological and emotional detail that has marked all of Kazuo Ishiguro's acclaimed works of fiction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow!

  • By Rebecca Lindroos on 11-29-09

A masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-11

These stories were extremely moving for me, and most admirable. Especially the first story is haunting and the narration is spectacular, more than masterful.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful