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  • Way of the Warrior: The Philosophy of Law Enforcement (Superbia)

  • By: Bernard Schaffer
  • Narrated by: James Patrick Cronin
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 88
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 79

Now mandatory in Police academies, FTO programs, and universities! The number one law enforcement philosophy series. Written by full-time Police Detective, and author Bernard Schaffer, whose new hardback novel The Thief of All Light will be available from Kensington Publications in bookstores everywhere. Whether you're a hard luck grunt working the street or a white shirt administrator who'd need a GPS to find it, Way of the Warrior is for you. Equal parts biography and instructional guide, Way of the Warrior focuses on the core of the individual officer: the warrior spirit. It discusses how to successfully uphold the law and not lose your mind in the process.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 🏆🎧 ABR Reviewer's Choice Award Winner

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 11-27-17

Intelligent and measured advice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-21-18

This is an outstanding work that strips away any mystique or bravado from discussion of law enforcement and concerns itself only with facts and genuine insight.
Schaffer doesn't claim to know everything on the subject and openly invites scrutiny, but he also backs up his positions with well reasoned arguments that show he has obviously given his every belief deep consideration.
His most controversial positions - on religion and the Black Lives Matter movement - will obviously upset a lot of people, but he just clearly states his position and backs it up with well-reasoned arguments. It's easier for me to say that, coming into this book as an atheist, than for someone who would have to turn their whole world upside down to agree with the author. However in all the reviews that disagree with him on this point, I'm yet to read one that makes as well considered an argument to disprove Schaffer's position.
I highly recommend this book.

  • Lions of Kandahar

  • The Story of a Fight Against All Odds
  • By: Major Rusty Bradley, Kevin Maurer
  • Narrated by: Eric G. Dove
  • Length: 8 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,095
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,882
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,881

Southern Afghanistan was slipping away. That was clear to then-Captain Rusty Bradley as he began his third tour of duty there in 2006. The Taliban and their allies were infiltrating everywhere, poised to reclaim Kandahar Province, their strategically vital onetime capital. To stop them, the NATO coalition launched Operation Medusa, the largest offensive in its history. The battlefield was the Panjwayi Valley, a densely packed warren of walled compounds that doubled neatly as enemy bunkers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 'Merica!

  • By Nick Keene on 03-07-15

Worth multiple reads

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-18

One of the best first hand accounts from the GWOT. There are so many lessons here on soldiering, combat profiling and leadership. A must read for military pers.

  • Misunderstanding Terrorism

  • By: Marc Sageman
  • Narrated by: Flip Crummer
  • Length: 5 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars 1

Misunderstanding Terrorism provides a striking reassessment of the scope and nature of the global neo-jihadi threat to the West. The post-9/11 decade experienced the emergence of new forms of political violence and new terrorist actors. More recently, Marc Sageman's understanding of how and why people have adopted fundamentalist ideologies and terrorist methods has evolved.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Really just a personal justification

  • By John on 08-26-17

Really just a personal justification

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-17

Sageman has done more research on the subject matter than most so I don't doubt his facts. And there are advantages to his rigidly scientific approach - i.e. it eliminates a lot of the fear mongering and overreaction that affects a lot of political discourse on terrorism - but he also ignores a lot of the intangibles inherent in counter-terrorism work and makes a case for a return to the kind of systems that allowed the 9/11 terrorists to carry out their attacks.
Large portions of this book are devoted to justifying positions taken in his previous book against attacks from other subject matter experts rather than presenting new insights, so for that reason I asked for a refund.
Also the narration is pretty shoddy - there is audible page turning at times.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Wars of the Green Berets

  • Amazing Stories from Vietnam to the Present Day
  • By: Robin Moore, Michael Lennon
  • Narrated by: Tori Kamal
  • Length: 9 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18

Authors Robin Moore and Michael Lennon team up in this exciting new novel to tell the "fictionalized" stories of the men who have risked it all for the U.S.A.: the Green Berets. They take us from firefights on the Cambodian border during the Vietnam War to the streets and alleyways of Iraq today. They teach us what it was really like to patrol the streets of Mogadishu in the days of Black Hawk Down. They show the horror that was Saddam's Iraq during the first Gulf War. They take us to the moonscape that is Afghanistan in search of the Taliban. The Wars of the Green Berets continues the saga of Moore's classic The Green Berets, revealing more than a few tantalizing secrets and anecdotes for the first time.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Subseequently C-P-T Smith

  • By Dennis on 03-13-14

Okay book, not amazing, terrible narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-17

This is one of the strangest audiobook experiences I've ever had.
The book is nothing special, but there are some interesting anecdotes and factoids scattered throughout, but the combination of some poor presentation choices on the authors' part and the worst narration I have ever heard make it an absolute chore to get through the whole thing.
The book itself ties together several personal stories from people who've been part of Army Special Forces or worked with them across several decades from the Vietnam War through to just after the end of Gulf War 2. It helps to know going in that all the stories and people are interconnected - it's not a collection of completely separate anecdotes - so you understand the reason you're reading about a guy from 10th Mtn early on will become clear later.
It's honestly hard to know how good or bad the book actually is, because even if it was the greatest piece of writing ever created, the narration would make it disjointed and hard to follow.
LISTEN TO A SAMPLE BEFORE YOU BUY THIS BOOK and decide weather you can put up with eight hours of that. It's seriously as if the text of the book was fed into a computer and recorded in the generic Windows text-to-speech app, complete with mispronunciations (not just military jargon words, but words like "subsequently"), pausing mid sentence in ways that make the whole thing harder to follow and odd word emphasis, or no emphasis at all. It's like the narrator doesn't actually understand what he's saying and is just trying to get it all out phonetically.
Then there are the acronyms. There must have been subject matter experts involved in the research of this book, but clearly none of them have listened to the narration. Some of the worst examples - USS-OCOM (instead of US-SOCOM) CASE-VAC (instead of CAS-EVAC), WAR-NORD (instead of WARN-ORD).
I stuck it out to the end, but I was so happy when it was over.
Finally, the authors made the odd decision to try and put the broader international political context of the on-the-ground actions into conversations between the soldiers featured in the book. I guess I get what they're trying to do, but the conversations come across as stilted, and sound especially wooden with the narrator's awful presentation. I think that context would have been better laid out in a brief paragraph and more time could be spent detailing the soldiers' actions on the ground.
At the end of the day, it's hard to know how good or bad the writing is, because the narration is so terrible. Most shocking of all is that someone, at some point, listened to that narration and decided it was acceptable to sell to people as an audiobook.

  • Eyes on Target

  • Inside Stories from the Brotherhood of the U.S. Navy SEALs
  • By: Scott McEwen, Richard Miniter
  • Narrated by: Holter Graham
  • Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 369
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340

Told through the eyes of current and former Navy SEALs, Eyes on Target is an inside account of some of the most harrowing missions in American history-including the mission to kill Osama bin Laden and the mission that wasn't, the deadly attack on the US diplomatic outpost in Benghazi where a retired SEAL sniper with a small team held off one hundred terrorists while his repeated radio calls for help went unheeded.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Just an attempt to cash in

  • By John on 09-24-16

Just an attempt to cash in

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-16

This is the first time I've asked for my money back, mostly because I wanted to deny the authors the opportunity to make money with a poorly researched, lazy attempt to cash in on the popularity of SEALs after the Bin Laden raid.
First, most of the stories you read about here have been told before in more detail and with better accuracy - this book is riddled with basic factual errors that make me think the authors didn't even bother to run a draft back past their interview subjects before printing. Many of the stories here have whole books dedicated to them. Read Lone Survivor, 13 Hours, and No Easy Day and you'll have covered 2/3 of the content of this book and you'll glean a better sense of SEAL culture as well - not the false bravado and macho bullshit presented here.
And then there's all the partisan political nonsense towards the end of the book where the authors seemed to decide that we, the readers, bought a book promising "the inside stories from the brotherhood of the US Navy SEALs" to hear what they think about Obama. Now I'm no hardcore Democrat, but that stuff has no place in a book like this.
Holter Graham's narration isn't his best work here, but it's not bad - I've listened to a few audiobooks he's narrated and he does a good job. Scott McEwen should probably stick to writing trashy B-Grade military fiction. And Richard Miniter, well looking at this dude's other work, he's probably the brains behind the decision to lump in all the political bullshit. He's basically what's wrong with journalists today - more interested in pushing his partisan line than getting the facts straight in his own story.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Ables

  • By: Jeremy Scott
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Scott
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,967
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,842
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,842

It wasn't the sex talk he expected. Phillip Sallinger's dad has told him he's a custodian - a guardian - and his genetically inherited power is telekinesis. He'll learn to move objects with his mind. Excited to begin superhero high school until he discovers he's assigned to a special-ed class for disabled empowered kids, he suddenly feels like an outsider.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The reading was way too fast! I love this book.

  • By javion on 05-18-15

Genuinely entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-15

I don't read a lot of fiction, but I'm a fan of the author's CinemaSins YouTube channel so I decided to give this one a try. And I'm glad I did - The Ables is a thoroughly entertaining adventure tale reminiscent of childhood favourites like The Goonies.
Jeremy is a capable story teller with a visual style that shines through even in a novel written from a blind person's point of view. His experience with film is evident in the structure and story beats, which would translate almost one-to-one into a film script if ever this story were picked up by a studio.
The author also proves to be a capable narrator, which is not surprising given his background in entertainment. It took me a few minutes to settle in to his fast rhythm of speech, but once I did I found it brought the scenes to life more vividly than if a slower speaker had been running the show.
I did see some of the plot twists coming a fair way in advance. I imagine it's hard to fine tune a story like this to the point where everything is sufficiently foreshadowed so the twists make sense when they come, without giving the game away too early for most readers. For me personally, some were a bit too obvious, but I don't know if that means they really are too obvious or if I'm just smarter than average (if I had to choose, I'd say it's definitely the second one). I think there were also a couple of consistency problems (I know I'm taking a leap suggesting consistency problems in a story by the guy who does CinemaSins, so I may be wrong about this), mostly to do with the main character Phillip's blindness and his actions at times that didn't always seem to fit with the restrictions of the various ways he and his friends negate the disability throughout the story.
I could be wrong, and even if I'm right, these minor inconsistencies don't detract from the genuinely entertaining story. In fact the story is probably better for not getting bogged down in the semantics of blindness workarounds - for the purposes of a story about people with super-human abilities, it's probably enough that we just accept Phillip has a workaround that allows him to act like a sighted person despite his physical blindness.
Overall, The Ables is a genuinely entertaining adventure story, a great read that would also make a great movie. I'm looking forward to seeing Jeremy continue the story in a sequel and then round out the trilogy with a third book that will inevitably be split into two films in the big screen adaptation.

22 of 24 people found this review helpful