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  • 8
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  • Grant

  • By: Ron Chernow
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 48 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,631
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,156
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,127

Ulysses S. Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and an inept businessman or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Chernow reveals in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Book (BUT WHERE IS THE PDF FILES)????

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-25-17

Excellence in print.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-18

Tremendous work, performed artistically. And the editors did their work well. (And, finally, an author and editor capable of using the word “nonplussed” correctly.

  • Paul

  • A Biography
  • By: N. T. Wright
  • Narrated by: James Langton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 955
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 852
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 844

In this definitive biography, renowned Bible scholar, Anglican bishop, and best-selling author N. T. Wright offers a radical look at the apostle Paul, illuminating the humanity and remarkable achievements of this intellectual who invented Christian theology - transforming a faith and changing the world. For centuries, Paul, the apostle who "saw the light on the Road to Damascus" and made a miraculous conversion from zealous Pharisee persecutor to devoted follower of Christ, has been one of the church's most widely cited saints.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Different type of writing for Wright is helpful

  • By Adam Shields on 04-25-18

Must read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-18

There are books that speak to what happened. This book tells both what happened and why. Paul taught people how to think differently and this book sets the stage for how that change in thinking changed history. And the narrator, Jame Langton, does a fantastic job. His enthusiasm engages the listener. Maybe the best I have listened to.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Admirals

  • Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King - The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea
  • By: Walter Borneman
  • Narrated by: Brian Troxell
  • Length: 17 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 818
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 730
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 734

Only four men in American history have been promoted to the five-star rank of Admiral of the Fleet: William Leahy, Ernest King, Chester Nimitz, and William Halsey. These four men were the best and the brightest the navy produced, and together they led the U.S. Navy to victory in World War II, establishing the United States as the world's greatest fleet. In The Admirals, award-winning historian Walter R. Borneman tells their story in full detail for the first time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic Insight In To Another Side Of the War

  • By K. Winters on 02-25-13

Incomplete

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-18

This is a good book. But I have three issues with it: 1) there is little treatment of the Atlantic theater; 2) the Admirals’ role with submarines in the Pacific is largely ignored; and 3) there is little detail regarding the inter-allied staff conferences.

Also, your editor should have caught the misuse of nonplussed.

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,552
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,260
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,274

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, insightful, intriguing.

  • By Peter on 03-05-10

Necessary reading to understand world history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-17

Would you listen to Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World again? Why?

Yes; this material provides foundation material to any understanding of the world as it is today.

  • Persian Fire

  • The First World Empire and the Battle for the West
  • By: Tom Holland
  • Narrated by: Michael Page
  • Length: 14 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 589
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 530
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 530

In the fifth century BC, a global superpower was determined to bring truth and order to what it regarded as two terrorist states. The superpower was Persia, incomparably rich in ambition, gold, and men. The terrorist states were Athens and Sparta, eccentric cities in a poor and mountainous backwater: Greece. The story of how their citizens took on the Great King of Persia, and thereby saved not only themselves, but Western civilization as well, is as heart-stopping and fateful as any episode in history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • East Mets West

  • By TS Dart on 08-22-16

Good overview, needed more editing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-27-17

This work provides a solid overview for understanding the Persian/Greek conflict. Good editing would have considerably shortened the work. The author offers pretensions of takeaways for present day, but nothing of substance.

  • Reconstruction

  • America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877
  • By: Eric Foner
  • Narrated by: Norman Dietz
  • Length: 30 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172

The period following the Civil War was one of the most controversial eras in American history. This comprehensive account of the period captures the drama of those turbulent years that played such an important role in shaping modern America.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Outdated edition!!

  • By Bruce on 11-02-17

A frequently misunderstood period of history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-16

This is a lengthy book--sometimes tough with audiobooks. But the narrator does a good job and the subject is thoughtfully and thoroughly examined.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Alexander Hamilton

  • By: Ron Chernow
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 35 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 14,766
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,841
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12,769

Historians have long told the story of America’s birth as the triumph of Jefferson’s democratic ideals over the aristocratic intentions of Hamilton. Chernow presents an entirely different man, whose legendary ambitions were motivated not merely by self-interest but by passionate patriotism and a stubborn will to build the foundations of American prosperity and power.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Outstanding & Riveting Book!

  • By Kevin on 03-04-05

Masterful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-16

Excellent history performed well. Good not only as its own work for those well versed in the period, but as a springboard into other works on the period.

  • The Quartet

  • Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789
  • By: Joseph J. Ellis
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 535
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 495
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 494

From Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian Joseph J. Ellis, the unexpected story of why the 13 colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Wonderful Gem

  • By Mike From Mesa on 10-20-15

Not worth the time

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-15

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Mr. Dean did a find job with limited material.

Has The Quartet turned you off from other books in this genre?

No

Have you listened to any of Robertson Dean’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

n/a

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Not terrible as an overview

Any additional comments?

This book functions as an overview of the period. But one gets the feeling that the author wrote the book only as an excuse to criticize an "original intent" concept of the constitution (though he doesn't define what he means by that term or who, he believes, would fall within the followers of that concept). For better scholarship and delivery, go to Pauline Maier's Ratification or some of the excellent biographies regarding notable persons of the period (e.g., McCullough's book on John Adams is spectacular, as is Chernow's book on Alexander Hamilton).

0 of 1 people found this review helpful