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Harold

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  • Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

  • By: Ulysses S. Grant
  • Narrated by: Robin Field
  • Length: 29 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 543
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 452
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 453

Among the autobiographies of great military figures, Ulysses S. Grant’s is certainly one of the finest, and it is arguably the most notable literary achievement of any American president: a lucid, compelling, and brutally honest chronicle of triumph and failure. From his frontier boyhood, to his heroics in battle, to the grinding poverty from which the Civil War ironically rescued him, these memoirs are a mesmerizing, deeply moving account of a brilliant man told with great courage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly funny and very informative.

  • By Trent on 08-20-12

The Definitive Ulysses S. Grant story!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-15

What made the experience of listening to Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant the most enjoyable?

I really got to know the nature and character of this Great American.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant?

To understand the humble personality of U.S. Grant and how much he gave of himself to save the Union.

What about Robin Field’s performance did you like?

The Narrator was absolutely perfect to present the small physical stature of Mr. Grant and his shyness.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

This is a book that is not a novel. It is segmented into the different eras of Mr. Grants life and the many fronts of the War to Save The Union so there is no need to listen to it in one setting.

Any additional comments?

If you only read one book on the War to Save the Union, this is it!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Histories

  • By: Herodotus
  • Narrated by: Bernard Mayes
  • Length: 28 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 379
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 221
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 222

Herodotus is not only the father of the art and the science of historical writing, but also one of the Western tradition's most compelling storytellers. In tales such as that of Gyges, who murders Candaules, the king of Lydia, and usurps his throne and his marriage bed, thereby bringing on, generations later, war with the Persians, Herodotus laid bare the intricate human entanglements at the core of great historical events.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Pater historiae: Latin, b/c who gets Greek jokes?

  • By Darwin8u on 05-21-12

Could have been much better produced.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-15

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

A great deal of detail about the lay of the land and battles, but very hard to follow the time line without referencing other source material.

Would you ever listen to anything by Herodotus again?

No.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He spoke in a Classic Old English accent and used a lot of "Thees" and "Thous" when the Greeks thought of those people from Europe as "Barbarians". The narrator should have spoken English with a slight Greek accent to make it more from the time.

Do you think The Histories needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

What the producer of the audio tape should have done is provide Editor's Notes along the way and give a timeline reference we can understand and also define various terms of measurement like cubit, furlong, talon and the many other ancient terms so I could understand the reference of distances and weights. Also give a reference to the current name or location of a City mentioned in the History. There are many rivers and land formations/mountains mentioned. Giving the current name of the river or mountain range would have been very helpful.

Any additional comments?

The History was too tedious and had very few interesting periods. It is not interesting to hear about the family lineage of someone back twenty generations.

  • The Big Rich

  • The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Texas Oil Fortunes
  • By: Bryan Burrough
  • Narrated by: James Jenner
  • Length: 22 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 279
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 279

Best-selling author Bryan Burrough reveals how four Texas oil tycoons transformed America. Rising from humble beginnings through hard work and shrewd dealings, they shifted the balance of power in American politics. While hobnobbing with movie stars and presidents, the Big Rich also created the legend of the swaggering Texas oilman with island hideaways and sprawling ranches.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Houston Oilman

  • By Andrew on 10-12-09

Powerful story of the Biggest Men in Big Oil

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-08-14

If you could sum up The Big Rich in three words, what would they be?

Intriguing, Exciting, Tragic

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Big Rich?

The Clint Merchison family and the creation of the Dallas Cowboys.

Have you listened to any of James Jenner’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, I have not.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It made me feel compassion for the tragic fall from power two of these four families experienced.

Any additional comments?

Very informative and entertaining.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • First into Nagasaki

  • By: George Weller
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
  • Length: 11 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30

On September 6, 1945, less than a month after the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, George Weller, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, became the first free Westerner to enter the devastated city. Going into the hospitals and consulting the doctors of the bomb's victims, Weller was the first to document its unprecedented long-range medical effects. He also became the first to enter the nearby Allied POW camps, which rivaled those of the Nazis for cruelty and bested them for death count.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • First Into Nagasaki

  • By Harold on 02-15-07

First Into Nagasaki

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-07

As Walter Cronkite says in the introduction, "This is an important book".

There are many strong images about the Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki that have been promoted for the last sixty-two years that are significantly changed by this monumental history. The effect of "Bomb" was, in fact, much different than I was taught as an average American born in 1948. The dis-information purpetrated by General MacArthur and the Truman Administration is important for everyone to understand.

The Bomb was much less powerful and all devastating than portrayed and the effect of gamma radiation was much more than the U. S. Government wanted people to know about for fear of being tried for crimes against humanity.

The story of the terrible war crimes in the Japanese Prisoner of War camps is something Americans need to know about.

I highly recommend this book. It should be required reading in all High Schools.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful