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Hebern

Clinton, NC, United States
  • 38
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 90
  • ratings
  • Notorious RBG

  • The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
  • By: Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik
  • Narrated by: Andi Arndt
  • Length: 5 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,973
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,661
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,651

Nearly a half century into being a feminist and legal pioneer, something funny happened to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The octogenarian won the Internet. Across America, people who weren't even born when Ginsburg made her name are tattooing themselves with her face, setting her famously searing dissents to music, and making viral videos in tribute.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story about a fascinating person, however...

  • By Jessica on 12-10-15

An Excellent Summary Of An Excellent Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

I found this to be very informative. I am a lawyer, but it wasn't directed at lawyers. It was directed at the general public. At a little over 5 hours it was much shorter than my normal listens. The shortness insured that it was packed with interesting facts. It is an excellent summary of RBG both personally and legally as of the writing (during the 2016 campaign evidently). Personally, her marriage was very interesting. She was married to the perfect man not to limit her in any way. Her husband, Marty, was also a lawyer. Marty was a Harvard Law Grad and noted Tax Attorney with the self confidence and lack of ego to #1 proclaim that his wife was the legal star of the family and #2 to allow her career to come first in the marriage over his (they moved for her job when despite her legal reputation he was the higher earner of the two). It was obvious that they not only loved each other very much, but also respected each other as lawyers very much as well. It was a perfect environment for her to become what she has become. The book also does a good job of explaining her legal philosophy both as an advocate and now on the bench. In general she is a legal moderate who abhors discrimination. It is from that perspective you understand her Court opinions that many view as liberal. In most of those decisions she simply identifies and tries to eradicate the discrimination that she sees, because she has lived it as a female Jew, that her colleagues on the bench sometimes do not. The book does contain an excellent examination of her dissent in a voting rights case that set the stage for many of the disputes we are seeing around the country now on changes in voting laws. The book also examines her friendship with Antoinin Scalia. The two were on the DC Circuit together long before being on the Supreme Court together. They were close friends despite their judicial differences due to other common interests and although the book doesn't say it also probably due to being the two brightest people on the court at the time. I'd recommend the book. You do not have to be a political or legal junkie to enjoy it.

  • Fields of Battle

  • Pearl Harbor, the Rose Bowl, and the Boys Who Went to War
  • By: Brian Curtis
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

In the wake of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the 1942 Rose Bowl was moved from Pasadena to Durham, North Carolina, out of fear of Japanese attacks on the West Coast. It remains the only Rose Bowl game to ever be played outside of Pasadena. Duke University, led by legendary coach Wallace Wade Sr., faced off against underdog Oregon State College, with both teams preparing for a grueling fight on the football field while their thoughts wandered to the battlefields they would soon be on.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Totally Didn't Expect to Like This Book - Great!

  • By Peppermint on 01-05-18

A good, not great book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-18

This one is about the 1942 Rose Bowl game hosted by Duke. Being from North Carolina I had always heard about the Rose Bowl that was held in our state, but never knew any of the details. This book does fill in the blanks on that. It then follows the participants, many of whom went from the football field to fields of war in WWII shortly after the game. It's a good, not great book. It was worth listening to for the details on Wallace Wade. I had no idea what a coaching giant he was. He won 3 National Titles at Alabama before coming to Duke including the year before he left Alabama! He was basically Bear Bryant before Bear. He then left Duke and served in WWII in his 50's because he felt it was his duty. Actually if the whole book had been on Wade it would have been a better book. He was obviously a very impressive man in addition to being a great football coach.

  • Doctor Sleep

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,695
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,241
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,241

Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special 12-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals. This is an epic war between good and evil, a gory, glorious story that will thrill the millions of hyper-devoted fans of The Shining and wildly satisfy anyone new to the territory of this icon in the King canon.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The sequel to the book; not the movie

  • By Don Gilbert on 09-28-13

I'm sorry Mr. King

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-18

I really owe Stephen King an apology. For years (without reading any of his book) I thought he was "just" a horror writer. His storytelling and ability to make even the events of normal life is fantastic. He's on par with Pat Conroy on that. This was an excellent follow up to The Shinning, the book. The book The Shinning is so much different than the movie that you really shouldn't read Doctor Sleep if you've only seen the movie and haven't read the book. Danny is now grown up. He's struggling to deal with his shinning and doing so in much the same way that his dad dealt with problems. After he hits rock bottom and tries to clean up his life he comes into contact with a little girl who also has the shine and that relationship changes his life forever. In addition to being a great writer, King's books are read by great narrators. Actor Will Patton reads this one and does a great job. A great narrator can't save a bad book on audio, but he or she can make the overall experience even better with a good book as Patton did here.

  • Ted Williams

  • The Biography of an American Hero
  • By: Leigh Montville
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 20 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 155
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83

He was one of the greatest figures of his generation, and arguably the greatest baseball hitter of all time. But what made Ted Williams a legend, and a lightning rod for controversy in life and in death? New York Times best-selling author Leigh Montville delivers an intimate, riveting account of this extraordinary life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very revealing

  • By Joseph on 02-19-05

Not the typical sports biography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

Very interesting and a little different for a sports biography. It was 22 hours and his baseball career ended before the first 12 hours were done. He was one of baseball’s greatest hitters, flew planes in WW2 and Korea, was one of the best fishermen in the world and upon death made headlines when his two youngest children had his head and body cryogenically frozen (in two different locations). His son either used him as a cash cow signing autographs for a fee in his 80s or he provided for his kids by doing so depending on which version you believe. He was a complex man, who didn't adhere to social norms because he could get away with not doing so due to his huge talent. But, he was very generous to the people and causes that touched him.

  • The Accidental President

  • Harry S. Truman and the Four Months That Changed the World
  • By: A. J. Baime
  • Narrated by: Tony Messano
  • Length: 14 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 568
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 529
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 527

The dramatic, pulse-pounding story of Harry Truman's first four months in office, when this unlikely president had to take on Germany, Japan, Stalin, and the atomic bomb, with the fate of the world hanging in the balance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional

  • By Jean on 11-14-17

Interesting Slice of History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-18



The book was very informative about a very important 4 months in American history. I came away impressed with the decision process and concerns with dropping the first bomb, but was really disappointed by the lack of thought and concern with dropping the second. It was like the main concern was whether we were going to engage in nuclear war or not and at the time they didn’t treat each atomic bomb as an event to be considered on its own merits. I say this because it has always been something that has bothered me intellectually and morally. I can see the many arguments for the first bomb and the book does an excellent job of laying them out, but I’ve always had a much more difficult time with the second.

The book does a great job of showing the extent to which Truman never even wanted to be VP and certainly never wanted to be POTUS. It was clear that his wife wanted neither for the family as well.

One additional thing that really stood out was during the Potsdam Conference where Truman, Churchill and Stalin met to map out the ending of WW2, Churchill brought with him his political opponent. He was up for re-election and wanted wanted what was best for England in the event he lost. He wanted his political opponent to be in the best possible position to lead England through the end of the war. It was a remarkable instance of country over party and it proved very beneficial because Churchill did in fact lose that bid for re-election.

Overall, it was an informative book about a very important time in world and US history.

The narrator was solid and appropriate for the subject matter.

  • Born to Run

  • By: Bruce Springsteen
  • Narrated by: Bruce Springsteen
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,224
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,740
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,708

In 2009, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band performed at the Super Bowl's halftime show. The experience was so exhilarating that Bruce decided to write about it. That's how this extraordinary autobiography began. Over the past seven years, Bruce Springsteen has privately devoted himself to writing the story of his life, bringing to this audio the same honesty, humor, and originality found in his songs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Boss demonstrates his strong work ethic and dedication to excellence as he tells his story.

  • By Tim on 12-21-16

Great book, changed my perception of Bruce

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

This book is probably only for people who are already Springsteen fans. I'm as ambivalent about this book as any I've done in recent memory. I'm a huge Springsteen fan. I've seen him (I think) 7 times in concert. I love his music. But the book made me like him less as a person. He's much more self centered and egotistical than I would have thought. Both traits come through loud and clear. The way he writes about his bouts with depression as a multi-millionaire vs. his father dealing with depression as a working class person struggling to provide for his family made that very clear. He also confessed to a lot of his own sins even though the public confessions will probably hurt those he loves. The book did provide insight into how the band was formed and a lot of input into the origins of many songs, which I loved. I really wanted to like the book. It's gotten generally very good reviews and maybe I'm clouding my opinion of the author after reading it with my opinion of the book itself, so I'm giving the book a good rating even though it made me like the author less, if that makes sense. Bruce did do a great job reading it. It was obviously a very personal project for him.

  • The City of Mirrors

  • The Passage Trilogy, Book Three
  • By: Justin Cronin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 29 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,089
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,540
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,528

The Twelve have been destroyed, and the 100-year reign of darkness that descended upon the world has ended. The survivors are stepping outside their walls, determined to build society anew - and daring to dream of a hopeful future.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ends the series with a whimper.

  • By Amazon Customer on 06-03-16

A fitting conclusion to an excellent trilogy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

It's the best of the trilogy. For those not familiar with the books they are not independent. They have to be done in order to make any sense. It is the tale of an apocalyptic virus that wipes out the majority of the human population and turns the majority of those left into “virals”, super fast and super strong animalistic killing machines who only have light as their main weakness. But, like most of these stories the real story is about human survival in the face of incredible odds. There is another storyline that I won’t spoil that develops slower and takes on religious symbolism. For Audible subscribers, it’s a great use of credits. For 3 credits, you get 3 really good books and around 90 hours of entertainment. Scott Brick is the narrator of all 3 and gives his normal outstanding performance

  • Tiger Woods

  • By: Jeff Benedict, Armen Keteyian
  • Narrated by: Roger Casey
  • Length: 15 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,466
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,310
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,311

In 2009, Tiger Woods was the most famous athlete on the planet, a transcendent star of almost unfathomable fame and fortune living what appeared to be the perfect life - married to a Swedish beauty and the father of two young children. Winner of 14 major golf championships and 79 PGA Tour events, Woods was the first billion-dollar athlete, earning more than $100 million a year in endorsements from the likes of Nike, Gillette, AT&T, and Gatorade. But it was all a carefully crafted illusion. As it turned out, Woods had been living a double life for years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Balanced Look at One of Golf's Greatest

  • By Bill Pence on 05-09-18

Great book, Poor Narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

Finished it up last night. Really good book looking at both his golf life and his personal life. It was written by two Sports Illustrated writers who spent 4 years on it and interviewed hundreds of people. Bottom line is they think he’s the best golfer of all time, but VERY flawed as a person. The root of all his personal problems seems to be that he only thinks of himself. That thought process also helps him in the very individual sport of golf. Overall I thought the book was very fair to him, but I’m sure those who worship him will think they harp on his personal flaws too much and those who hate him will think they overstate his abilities on the course.

The narration was awful. So many golf terms and names were mispronounced that it was really distracting. Is it really that hard for the author to listen to it before it is released or at least to have an editor of the audio version who is familiar with the subject matter? Thank goodness the book was good enough to allow me to power through the bad narration.

  • The Right Stuff

  • By: Tom Wolfe
  • Narrated by: Dennis Quaid
  • Length: 15 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,163
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,074
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,067

Millions of words have poured forth about man's trip to the moon, but until now few people have had a sense of the most engrossing side of the adventure: namely, what went on in the minds of the astronauts themselves - in space, on the moon, and even during certain odysseys on earth. It is this, the inner life of the astronauts, that Tom Wolfe describes with his almost uncanny empathetic powers that made The Right Stuff a classic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Righteous Book, Righteous Narrator, Righteous MEN!

  • By Gillian on 02-08-18

Dennis Quaid really brought it to life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

I enjoyed the book. I was never really a space nut, so I learned a lot. There were a lot of interesting things about the development of the space program. Some of it could have been very dry without Dennis Quaid as the reader. He did one of the best jobs with this book that I have heard. If you’ve seen the movie, it is very true to the book. That’s not always the case. Of course, even with a long movie like this one which was 3 hours, you get a lot more in the book which was almost 16 hours. A must for those interested in our space program and very enjoyable and informative to those like me with only a passing interest.

  • Game Changers

  • Dean Smith, Charlie Scott, and the Era That Transformed a Southern College Town
  • By: Art Chansky
  • Narrated by: Mirron Willis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

Among many legendary episodes from the life and career of men's basketball coach Dean Smith, few loom as large as his recruitment of Charlie Scott, the first African American scholarship athlete at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Drawn together by college basketball in a time of momentous change, Smith and Scott helped transform a university, a community, and the racial landscape of sports in the South.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Much More Than Basketball

  • By Hebern on 07-18-18

Much More Than Basketball

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

Really good book. It’s more about integration than basketball. About a third to a half is about the integration of Chapel Hill in general and the rest is Charlie Scott’s story at UNC. Again focusing more on integration than basketball, but basketball is a vital part of that story. Smith has always been a liberal, but didn’t feel safe enough in his job to take public liberal stances until he started winning big at UNC.

The reader was really bad. He mispronounced local towns and names and was obviously unfamiliar with basketball terms. It was bad enough that it was a distraction, but the book was good enough to power through that.

The author is a Carolina guy. I was afraid that he would deify Smith and Scott to a degree that I wouldn’t like it. He did not, although it is obvious he liked both a lot. He did reveal flaws in both which makes it seem more believable. Overall, it was a very interesting and informative book about events in NC during my lifetime, but during which I was too young to appreciate. I think it’s a must read for Carolina grads and an interesting one for even NC State grads like me.