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Hebern

Clinton, NC, United States
  • 41
  • reviews
  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 93
  • ratings
  • The Game: Harvard, Yale, and America in 1968

  • By: George Howe Colt
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 10 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

On November 23, 1968, near the end of a turbulent and memorable year, there was a football game that would also prove turbulent and memorable: the season-ending clash between Harvard and Yale. Both teams entered undefeated and, technically at least, came out undefeated. The final score was 29-29. To some of the players on the field, it was a triumph; to others a tragedy. George Howe Colt’s The Game is the story of that iconic American year, as seen through the young men who lived it and were changed by it.    

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More than a game

  • By Hebern on 11-05-18

More than a game

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-18

This was a very good sports book. Technically it is about one Harvard-Yale game in 1968, but it is about much more than that. It is about America in 1968. It is about the divisions in the country over the Vietnam War. It is about the changes in the two Universities. Yale had yet to admit females, but had changed its admission policies to be based on the academic records instead of their family background. This was a change that drew widespread criticism from the alums! And the students really wanted girls on campus, too! It is about the struggle of the black players to fit in at both universities and not be seen as just football players. It is about the struggle of one older player to fit in at very anti-war Harvard after serving in Vietnam. It is about the history of the Harvard-Yale series. Both teams won national titles in the early 20th century and were still very good football programs in 1968. In fact, Yale was ranked in the top 20 at the time of the 1968 game. It is about the players, who were an impressive and diverse group, including an undersized OL for Harvard named Tommy Lee Jones, who roomed with a kid named Al Gore. But, it was also about the most exciting tie in the history of college football. Both teams came into the season finale undefeated, but Yale was a huge favorite. Yale dominated the game as expected and lead by 16 with 42 seconds left. Just enough time for the remarkable Harvard comeback that provoked the headline the next day: Harvard Beats Yale 29-29. The book is very well written and the audio was also superbly read. I really enjoyed it. #SportsHistory #Nostalgic #1960s #IvyLeagueAthletes #NewEngland #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Time and Again

  • By: Jack Finney
  • Narrated by: Paul Hecht
  • Length: 17 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,381
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,216
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,213

Transported from the mid-twentieth century to New York City in the year 1882, Si Morley walks the fashionable "Ladies' Mile" of Broadway, is enchanted by the jingling sleigh bells in Central Park, and solves a 20th-century mystery by discovering its 19th-century roots. Falling in love with a beautiful young woman, he ultimately finds himself forced to choose between his lives in the present and the past. A story that will remain in the listener's memory, Time and Again is a remarkable blending of the troubled present and a nostalgic past....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best time travel novel; my very favorite audiobook

  • By Mark on 04-08-12

Slow start, but strong finish

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-23-18

I got this one when it was on sale because I liked Stephen King's 11-22-63 so much and he cites this book for his inspiration on the concept of time travel.It was written in 1970, but holds up well. The main character, Si Morely, is selected to participate in a govt experiment on time travel. Only certain personality types can actually make the jump time wise and Si fits the bill better than anyone. It started slow, but the last third of it was really good. As far as the concept of time travel is concerned, it didn’t explore it in as much detail as 11-22-63. And was not nearly as good. But, then again it is hard to match the imagination of Stephen King. He can make fantasy topics seem logical and real. This was not up to his standards in that, but I did enjoy it, especially the last third. The ending was really strong.

  • The Real All Americans

  • The Team That Changed a Game, a People, a Nation
  • By: Sally Jenkins
  • Narrated by: Don Leslie
  • Length: 13 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55

The most popular college football team in the early 20th century belonged to an institution called the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. Its story begins with Lt. Col. Richard Henry Pratt, a fierce abolitionist who believed that Native Americans deserved a place in American society. In 1879, Pratt made a treacherous journey to the Dakota Territory to recruit Carlisle's first students. Years later, three students approached Pratt with the notion of forming a football team.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • brain candy

  • By Kristiopher W. Easton on 06-23-17

Could have been better

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-18

I learned a few things, but it was not one of the better ones I've listened to. It’s advertised as a sports book, but it is really a book about the history of the Carlisle School for Indians. There was some interesting stuff there, but not particularly well done. I like my sports history books to be at least 50/50 on general history and the sport. This one was about 80% history and 20% football. There was some interesting football history. During part of the period that the book covers a touchdown was worth 4 points and a field goal was worth 5 points. The ball was different then and most of the FGs were attempted via drop kick. But, it’s still odd to imagine a FG being worth more than a TD! It also covers the period in which the forward pass became legal. In the early stages if you threw an incomplete pass you were penalized 15 yards! Jim Thorpe was on the featured team for Carlisle and there was a good section on his life. His life alone would be a good subject for a future book for me to read/listen to. He was a interesting fellow. Some interesting facts, but overall the book was a disappointment.

  • Notorious RBG

  • The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
  • By: Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik
  • Narrated by: Andi Arndt
  • Length: 5 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,267
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,925
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,913

Nearly a half century into being a feminist and legal pioneer, something funny happened to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The octogenarian won the Internet. Across America, people who weren't even born when Ginsburg made her name are tattooing themselves with her face, setting her famously searing dissents to music, and making viral videos in tribute.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fall in love with RBG! I did.

  • By serine on 01-23-16

An Excellent Summary Of An Excellent Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

I found this to be very informative. I am a lawyer, but it wasn't directed at lawyers. It was directed at the general public. At a little over 5 hours it was much shorter than my normal listens. The shortness insured that it was packed with interesting facts. It is an excellent summary of RBG both personally and legally as of the writing (during the 2016 campaign evidently). Personally, her marriage was very interesting. She was married to the perfect man not to limit her in any way. Her husband, Marty, was also a lawyer. Marty was a Harvard Law Grad and noted Tax Attorney with the self confidence and lack of ego to #1 proclaim that his wife was the legal star of the family and #2 to allow her career to come first in the marriage over his (they moved for her job when despite her legal reputation he was the higher earner of the two). It was obvious that they not only loved each other very much, but also respected each other as lawyers very much as well. It was a perfect environment for her to become what she has become. The book also does a good job of explaining her legal philosophy both as an advocate and now on the bench. In general she is a legal moderate who abhors discrimination. It is from that perspective you understand her Court opinions that many view as liberal. In most of those decisions she simply identifies and tries to eradicate the discrimination that she sees, because she has lived it as a female Jew, that her colleagues on the bench sometimes do not. The book does contain an excellent examination of her dissent in a voting rights case that set the stage for many of the disputes we are seeing around the country now on changes in voting laws. The book also examines her friendship with Antoinin Scalia. The two were on the DC Circuit together long before being on the Supreme Court together. They were close friends despite their judicial differences due to other common interests and although the book doesn't say it also probably due to being the two brightest people on the court at the time. I'd recommend the book. You do not have to be a political or legal junkie to enjoy it.

  • Fields of Battle

  • Pearl Harbor, the Rose Bowl, and the Boys Who Went to War
  • By: Brian Curtis
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

In the wake of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the 1942 Rose Bowl was moved from Pasadena to Durham, North Carolina, out of fear of Japanese attacks on the West Coast. It remains the only Rose Bowl game to ever be played outside of Pasadena. Duke University, led by legendary coach Wallace Wade Sr., faced off against underdog Oregon State College, with both teams preparing for a grueling fight on the football field while their thoughts wandered to the battlefields they would soon be on.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Totally Didn't Expect to Like This Book - Great!

  • By Peppermint on 01-05-18

A good, not great book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-18

This one is about the 1942 Rose Bowl game hosted by Duke. Being from North Carolina I had always heard about the Rose Bowl that was held in our state, but never knew any of the details. This book does fill in the blanks on that. It then follows the participants, many of whom went from the football field to fields of war in WWII shortly after the game. It's a good, not great book. It was worth listening to for the details on Wallace Wade. I had no idea what a coaching giant he was. He won 3 National Titles at Alabama before coming to Duke including the year before he left Alabama! He was basically Bear Bryant before Bear. He then left Duke and served in WWII in his 50's because he felt it was his duty. Actually if the whole book had been on Wade it would have been a better book. He was obviously a very impressive man in addition to being a great football coach.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Doctor Sleep

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,828
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,824

Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special 12-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals. This is an epic war between good and evil, a gory, glorious story that will thrill the millions of hyper-devoted fans of The Shining and wildly satisfy anyone new to the territory of this icon in the King canon.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The sequel to the book; not the movie

  • By Don Gilbert on 09-28-13

I'm sorry Mr. King

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-18

I really owe Stephen King an apology. For years (without reading any of his books) I thought he was "just" a horror writer. His storytelling and ability to make even the events of normal life is fantastic. He's on par with Pat Conroy on that. This was an excellent follow up to The Shinning, the book. The book The Shinning is so much different than the movie that you really shouldn't read Doctor Sleep if you've only seen the movie and haven't read the book. Danny is now grown up. He's struggling to deal with his shinning and doing so in much the same way that his dad dealt with problems. After he hits rock bottom and tries to clean up his life he comes into contact with a little girl who also has the shine and that relationship changes his life forever. In addition to being a great writer, King's books are read by great narrators. Actor Will Patton reads this one and does a great job. A great narrator can't save a bad book on audio, but he or she can make the overall experience even better with a good book as Patton did here. #Supernaturalpowers #Suspenseful #Scary #ContemporaryAmerica #ReluctantHero #ChildProtagonist #Tagsgiving #Sweepstakes

  • Ted Williams

  • The Biography of an American Hero
  • By: Leigh Montville
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 20 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87

He was one of the greatest figures of his generation, and arguably the greatest baseball hitter of all time. But what made Ted Williams a legend, and a lightning rod for controversy in life and in death? New York Times best-selling author Leigh Montville delivers an intimate, riveting account of this extraordinary life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very revealing

  • By Joseph on 02-19-05

Not the typical sports biography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

Very interesting and a little different for a sports biography. It was 22 hours and his baseball career ended before the first 12 hours were done. He was one of baseball’s greatest hitters, flew planes in WW2 and Korea, was one of the best fishermen in the world and upon death made headlines when his two youngest children had his head and body cryogenically frozen (in two different locations). His son either used him as a cash cow signing autographs for a fee in his 80s or he provided for his kids by doing so depending on which version you believe. He was a complex man, who didn't adhere to social norms because he could get away with not doing so due to his huge talent. But, he was very generous to the people and causes that touched him.

  • The Accidental President

  • Harry S. Truman and the Four Months That Changed the World
  • By: A. J. Baime
  • Narrated by: Tony Messano
  • Length: 14 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 680
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 629
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 624

The dramatic, pulse-pounding story of Harry Truman's first four months in office, when this unlikely president had to take on Germany, Japan, Stalin, and the atomic bomb, with the fate of the world hanging in the balance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional

  • By Jean on 11-14-17

Interesting Slice of History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-18



The book was very informative about a very important 4 months in American history. I came away impressed with the decision process and concerns with dropping the first bomb, but was really disappointed by the lack of thought and concern with dropping the second. It was like the main concern was whether we were going to engage in nuclear war or not and at the time they didn’t treat each atomic bomb as an event to be considered on its own merits. I say this because it has always been something that has bothered me intellectually and morally. I can see the many arguments for the first bomb and the book does an excellent job of laying them out, but I’ve always had a much more difficult time with the second.

The book does a great job of showing the extent to which Truman never even wanted to be VP and certainly never wanted to be POTUS. It was clear that his wife wanted neither for the family as well.

One additional thing that really stood out was during the Potsdam Conference where Truman, Churchill and Stalin met to map out the ending of WW2, Churchill brought with him his political opponent. He was up for re-election and wanted wanted what was best for England in the event he lost. He wanted his political opponent to be in the best possible position to lead England through the end of the war. It was a remarkable instance of country over party and it proved very beneficial because Churchill did in fact lose that bid for re-election.

Overall, it was an informative book about a very important time in world and US history.

The narrator was solid and appropriate for the subject matter.

  • Born to Run

  • By: Bruce Springsteen
  • Narrated by: Bruce Springsteen
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,420
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,927
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,896

In 2009, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band performed at the Super Bowl's halftime show. The experience was so exhilarating that Bruce decided to write about it. That's how this extraordinary autobiography began. Over the past seven years, Bruce Springsteen has privately devoted himself to writing the story of his life, bringing to this audio the same honesty, humor, and originality found in his songs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Boss demonstrates his strong work ethic and dedication to excellence as he tells his story.

  • By Tim on 12-21-16

Great book, changed my perception of Bruce

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

This book is probably only for people who are already Springsteen fans. I'm as ambivalent about this book as any I've done in recent memory. I'm a huge Springsteen fan. I've seen him (I think) 7 times in concert. I love his music. But the book made me like him less as a person. He's much more self centered and egotistical than I would have thought. Both traits come through loud and clear. The way he writes about his bouts with depression as a multi-millionaire vs. his father dealing with depression as a working class person struggling to provide for his family made that very clear. He also confessed to a lot of his own sins even though the public confessions will probably hurt those he loves. The book did provide insight into how the band was formed and a lot of input into the origins of many songs, which I loved. I really wanted to like the book. It's gotten generally very good reviews and maybe I'm clouding my opinion of the author after reading it with my opinion of the book itself, so I'm giving the book a good rating even though it made me like the author less, if that makes sense. Bruce did do a great job reading it. It was obviously a very personal project for him. #Biography #ContemporaryAmerica #Celebrity #Rockstar #NewJersey #tagsgiving #Sweepstakes

  • The City of Mirrors

  • A Novel (Book Three of the Passage Trilogy)
  • By: Justin Cronin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 29 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,201
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,642
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,631

The Twelve have been destroyed, and the 100-year reign of darkness that descended upon the world has ended. The survivors are stepping outside their walls, determined to build society anew - and daring to dream of a hopeful future.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't wait for the end

  • By Gberdan on 09-14-18

A fitting conclusion to an excellent trilogy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

It's the best of the trilogy. For those not familiar with the books they are not independent. They have to be done in order to make any sense. It is the tale of an apocalyptic virus that wipes out the majority of the human population and turns the majority of those left into “virals”, super fast and super strong animalistic killing machines who only have light as their main weakness. But, like most of these stories the real story is about human survival in the face of incredible odds. There is another storyline that I won’t spoil that develops slower and takes on religious symbolism. For Audible subscribers, it’s a great use of credits. For 3 credits, you get 3 really good books and around 90 hours of entertainment. Scott Brick is the narrator of all 3 and gives his normal outstanding performance

0 of 6 people found this review helpful