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Pamela

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  • Playing for the Ashes

  • By: Elizabeth George
  • Narrated by: Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 3 hrs
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 102
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

When country milkman Martin Snell makes his usual delivery to Celandine Cottage one spring morning in Kent, he expects to be greeted by the cottage's sensual and seductive tenant, Gabriella Patten, not by the charred remains of fire pointing to murder.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good Story, but...

  • By Andre on 06-29-05

Narration getting better....but the awful music!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-27-18

I've resigned myself to getting the abridged versions, all narrated at high speed by Jacbi. I can choose a slower speed but can't control the sometimes terrible production values (thus one was. OK) but the musuc--often played over the dialogue is distracting, and often dreadful. Don't they ever listen to their own productions???

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • For the Sake of Elena

  • By: Elizabeth George
  • Narrated by: Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 3 hrs
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 57
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 54

A young student at St. Stephen's College, the daughter of a professor up for a prestigious post, is found brutally murdered on an isolated jogging path. Unwilling to turn the killing over to the local police, the university calls in New Scotland Yard. Thus Lynley and his partner Havers enter the rarified world of Cambridge University, where academic gowns often hide murderous intentions. For both officers, the true identity of Elena Weaver proves as elusive as the mythical creature whose image decorated her dorm room. Not until they come to terms with the woman she was will they have a line on the killer - who just may kill again.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I hate abrudged books!!

  • By Pamela on 06-27-18

I hate abrudged books!!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-27-18

I've no idea why Audible has so many holes in this series...an 8 to 10 HR book in 3 hours? Especially an Elizabeth George novel. Ridiculous. in my I were able to sit down I would read the ebooks. derek Jacobi is not as good as the marvelous Sabina Porter, but better in this one than the previous one. I always have to set the speed at 85 or so--it's like he thinks the abridged version is still not short enough. sorry about mistakes--on phone and no glasses!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Crow Trap

  • A Vera Stanhope Mystery
  • By: Ann Cleeves
  • Narrated by: Anne Dover
  • Length: 14 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,194
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,080
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,066

Three very different women come together to complete an environmental survey. Three women who, in some way or another, know the meaning of betrayal.... For team leader Rachael Lambert, the project is the perfect opportunity to rebuild her confidence after a double betrayal by her lover and boss, Peter Kemp. Botanist Anne Preece, on the other hand, sees it as a chance to indulge in a little deception of her own. And then there is Grace Fulwell, a strange, uncommunicative young woman with plenty of her own secrets to hide....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth the Wait

  • By Marina on 02-26-17

Not what I expected

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-18

I am a big fan of Cleeve's Shetland Island series. Jimmy Peres is a presence from beginning to end. I like that.

Maybe my mistake was watching the Vera series on TV first. I was expecting the format and the personalities to be similar. Not at all. Besides which, Vera doesn't make an appearance until over halfway through the book. The one appearance Joe makes during that time, makes him seem like a real dullard.

Now that I am about an hour away from the end, Vera, Joe and her team actually become a real part of the story.

This Vera is not very likable, nor is Joe. In fact I find no characters at all that I care much about much less what happens to them. That removes what little suspense there is in Cleeves' work.

I'm willing to try book #2 but if there is no improvement, I am returning them both, and will re-read Shetland Island series.

  • Back Blast

  • A Gray Man Novel
  • By: Mark Greaney
  • Narrated by: Jay Snyder
  • Length: 18 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,703
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9,886
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,861

From the number-one New York Times best-selling coauthor of Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan novels comes an all-new explosive thriller featuring the lethal assassin known as the Gray Man.... Court Gentry was the CIA's best agent. Until the day the agency turned against him and put out a kill-on-sight order. That's when the enigmatic international assassin called the Gray Man was born - and Court has been working for himself ever since.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent GRAY MAN book - I can't wait for more...

  • By shelley on 02-17-16

uneven production values

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-18

I've read all the Gray Man novels. I haven't downgraded Snyder's narration only because the novels cycle through so many accents in which there are numerous mispronunciations, nor Greaney's many mostly small grammatical errors.....but this is the first one in which the volume fluctuates--sounds like the distance between Snyder and Mic constantly changes, often several times in one sentence. otherwise book is pretty solid for it's genre. Gentry's constant moral and ethical struggles continue and add depth to what could have been just another Jack Reacher

  • A Song for the Dying

  • By: Stuart MacBride
  • Narrated by: Ian Hanmore
  • Length: 15 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 165

A heart-stopping crime thriller from the author of three consecutive No. 1 bestsellers, including Birthdays for the Dead and the DI Logan McRae series. He's back... Eight years ago, ‘The Inside Man' murdered four women and left three more in critical condition - all of them with their stomachs slit open and a plastic doll stitched inside. And then the killer just … disappeared. Ash Henderson was a Detective Inspector on the initial investigation, but a lot can change in eight years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • MacBride knocks it out of the park.

  • By 6catz on 01-22-14

This almost didn't get 4 stars...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-17

...because it would have been REALLY nice if the book summary had mentioned that this was actually part 2. Now am I supposed endure the torture I know Ash Henderson is going to go through in part 1, when I know how it will come out??? I've already bought it, and am contemplating returning it, but I admit, battered as I am by A Song For the Dying, I really like MacBride's writing.

Glutton for punishment that I am, I'll probably read it. But I'll have to take a break and listen to something easier to take for a book or two!

Ian Hanmore's accent may be hard for an American's ears to understand at first, but using headphones helped and now I'm used to it. He doesn't distinguish enough between characters, but overall his narration is a positive for the book.

So be warned. Read Birthday's for the Dead first.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Scarred Woman

  • Department Q, Book 7
  • By: Jussi Adler-Olsen
  • Narrated by: Graeme Malcolm
  • Length: 14 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,313
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,205

Detective Carl Mørck of Department Q, Copenhagen's cold cases division, meets his toughest challenge yet when the dark, troubled past of one of his own team members collides with a sinister unsolved murder.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Torn, but great

  • By green ice cream garden on 09-27-17

Whoa!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-17

This one is sooo different from the rest of the series, all of which had a similar feeling. This one.is a completely different ride. Perhaps the author recently went through some major life events. Carl, Assad and especially Rose, go through some dramatic changes in this one--which is much less about a crime than about the evolution of the characters.

Despite the surprise, I recommend it. Narration is excellent.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Blind Eye

  • Logan McRae, Book 5
  • By: Stuart MacBride
  • Narrated by: Stuart MacBride
  • Length: 12 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 239
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 196

Aberdeen's growing Polish community is under attack from a serial offender who leaves mutilated victims to be discovered on building sites - eyes gouged out and the sockets burned. Detective Sergeant Logan McRae is assigned to the investigation, codenamed Operation Oedipus, but with the victims too scared to talk, it's going nowhere fast.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Blindingly Fast & Furious

  • By Lesley on 08-24-09

MacBride should not narrate his own books

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-17

I am a big fan of Stuart MacBride. This is not actually a critique of the book as I just started it. It's about the narration. This is the first of the Logan McRae series which isn't narrated by Steve Worsley, and I didn't notice the change when I bought it. Worsley's dry delivery, command of accents, and well paced delivery, suit MacBride to a T. MacBride's own voice does not.


While MacBride is better than a number of professional narrators I've heard, it's really affecting my enjoyment of this book. His version of the irascible DI Steele, as well as Logan's superior officer nemesis (in this book Finney), is just grating. He rushes the narration (I've actually had to slow it down), is too emotional, and it always sounds like he has an excess of saliva in his mouth. He also doesn't seem to understand how to convey someone speaking loudly without actually yelling in one's ear.


Because I like the series, I will continue. Unfortunately, to do so I will have to put up with MacBride in Book 6, too. Why oh why do authors make this mistake??? Neil Gaiman is one of the few authors whose narration of his own works I can count on.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Betrayal of Trust

  • A Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler Mystery, Book 6
  • By: Susan Hill
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 11 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 256
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 228
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 226

Simon Serrailler is faced with that most complicated of investigations - a cold case. Freak weather and flash floods have hit southern England. The small cathedral town of Lafferton is underwater, and a landslip on the moor has closed the roads. As the rain slowly drains away, a shallow grave - and a skeleton - is exposed; 20 years have passed, and the remains of missing teenager Joanne Lowther have finally been uncovered. Joanne, an only child, had been on her way home from a friend's house that night.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Love the series; this one not my favorite

  • By Janet H. Maddox on 11-22-13

I realize I don't like Susan Hill

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-17

I've just read the entire series, so this review is to cover them all. She writes well, plots are unlikely, but she carries them off for the most part, due to character development and command of English language.

My problem is that with this book and several others she commits what I feel is outright "entrapment". She starts out with characters who take opposite sides of moral arguments, leading you to believe it is just that--a discussion meant to show two sides of the debate and hopefully enrich plot development. And then, she turns the person(s) who represent the side of the argument the author doesn't represent into evil, or insane serial killers. Her side of any argument is based solely on traditional medicine, and traditional beliefs underpinned by very traditional Catholic morality.

A good example is Book 1, wherein at first a main character, Cat, appears to accept the idea that acupuncture can have real benefits, then Hill ends up turning the practitioner into a sexually deviant psychopathic serial killer, and with one broad brush paints all alternative healing methods into evil quackery.

This particular book turned on the subject of the right to choose the how and when of one's own death. I happen to live in a Right to Die state, and am glad of it. Once again the proponents of the side of the argument she doesn't like turns out to be nuts, or evil, or both. She does this a number of times during the series, and by the end I realized that if these books represent the personality and beliefs of the author herself, that I wouldn't like her very much. Way too dogmatic and narrow minded.

And when all was said and done, the short prequel that sucked me back into finishing this devious series just to find out why it even existed, was pointless--as nothing in the previous books led me to understand why Serailler lost an arm and why he was being feted.

I felt like an entire book was left out at the end. Tricked again...

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Hero: A Simon Serrailler Short Story

  • By: Susan Hill
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 44

When Simon Serrailler was a rookie constable with the Met, he did something reckless in the course of a night's work which caused a man's death. But his act was praised by his colleagues, and he was called a hero. Years later, now a detective chief superintendent who has been badly injured in the course of duty, he receives a medal for bravery at Buckingham Palace while recollecting that fateful night of his early career, when chance disguised itself as bravery.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This 'story' makes no sense to me

  • By Pamela on 05-10-17

This 'story' makes no sense to me

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-17

Why THIS story inserted belatedly at the beginning when it feels like an ending of sorts? It's been years since I read this series so I am now re-reading the whole lot just to find out what events led to this point, because right now I haven't a clue. Perhaps it will make more sense then, but even so, after two listens it barely constitutes a vignette.

  • Some Danger Involved

  • Barker & Llewelyn Series, Book 1
  • By: Will Thomas
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,709
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,512
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,502

An atmospheric debut novel set on the gritty streets of Victorian London, Some Danger Involved introduces detective Cyrus Barker and his assistant, Thomas Llewelyn, as they work to solve the gruesome murder of a young scholar in London's Jewish ghetto. When the eccentric and enigmatic Barker takes the case, he must hire an assistant, and out of all who answer an ad for a position with "some danger involved", he chooses downtrodden Llewelyn, a gutsy young man with a murky past.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clever writing!

  • By Kathi on 01-13-17

Enjoyable series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-17

I like the writing, the characters, the plots, the portrayal of Victorian London--not easy to do from a contemporary perspective--but this series is not helped by Antony Ferguson's narration. He's not bad, and won't keep me from finishing the series, but he doesn't add a star like good narrators can.

He over-enunciates every single word, and doesn't make much distinction between most of the characters save Barker--and his version of Barker's Scottish speech becomes irritating over time because he makes the rhythm the same regardless of circumstance. He delivery is tediously stilted and too emotionless. The only characters who sound at all natural are the some of the lower class who have cockney-type accents. Perhaps he thinks that's how everyone with any education in Victorian England spoke, but I doubt that's true.

Overall, I recommend these books. Especially for those who like period mysteries.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful