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Gabriel

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 244
  • helpful votes
  • 10
  • ratings
  • The Conquest of Bread

  • By: Pyotr Kropotkin
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

In The Conquest of Bread, first published in 1892, Kropotkin set out his ideas on how his heightened idealism could work. It was all the more extraordinary because he was born into an aristocratic land-owning family - with some 1,200 male serfs - though from his student years his liberal views and his fixation on the need for social change saw him take a revolutionary path. This led rapidly to decades of exile. It is a passionate, even a fierce polemic for dramatic social change. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • “All is for All”

  • By Gabriel on 01-02-19

“All is for All”

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-19

A book of amazing analysis & prediction of Capitalist & authoritative systems that strip the masses of any form of empowerment. Runs with the assertion using scientific experience that humanity is above all else, Good and full of a love for creation. Even translated to English, Kropotkin has a lovely handle of prose and a powerful moving way with words. I tend to be biased against British narrators since they have a tendency to be extremely dry & lifeless but this narrator had a unique voice and great ability to read that kept me hooked to every word. Essential reading for anybody who wants to make the world a better place.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,285
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 16,129
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,040

Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Take the Negative Reviews w/ a Grain of Salt

  • By Gabriel on 08-29-18

Take the Negative Reviews w/ a Grain of Salt

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

Before I decided to get this, I’ve seen a lot of recent Audible reviews come at this book with the same criticism “I like the first half when it’s about Homo sapiens, but the second half is all opinion and no proof!” Having listened to it, it’s pretty clear where the criticism comes from. The entire book gives the exact same framework and from the exact same viewpoint, and both the first and second half of this book give the same amount of proofs and studies to back up observations and claims, I think most people seem to have a problem with the fact that the second half of the book is deeply critical of The Enlightenment and the “science” that came with it, Classical Liberalism, Individualism and Capitalism and talks about these ideologies the same way one would observe ancient religions. He talks how these have gone against human biological interest and observed how it’s only natural that these have led to a new, consumerist society and mass alienation. I think it just goes to show a lot of folks are deeply attached to capitalism and Neoliberalism. That aside, this is a great book. It really made me learn a lot, and even with the stuff it told me that I already knew, what’s most crucial is that this book gives a proper framework for understanding humans and human institutions and how they were formed.

239 of 256 people found this review helpful