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Ron Peters

  • 11
  • reviews
  • 22
  • helpful votes
  • 21
  • ratings
  • The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs

  • A New History of a Lost World
  • By: Steve Brusatte
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,456
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,267
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,253

In this stunning narrative spanning more than 200 million years, Steve Brusatte, a young American paleontologist who has emerged as one of the foremost stars of the field - discovering 10 new species and leading groundbreaking scientific studies and fieldwork - masterfully tells the complete, surprising, and new history of the dinosaurs, drawing on cutting-edge science to dramatically bring to life their lost world and illuminate their enigmatic origins, spectacular flourishing, astonishing diversity, cataclysmic extinction, and startling living legacy.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • "The Rise of the Scientists Who Study Dinosaurs"

  • By Daniel Powell on 09-16-18

Didn't finish - first time

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-25-19

The most boring audiobook I've downloaded out of forty or fifty some-odd. Huge digressions about his personal life which interested me not in the slightest.

  • On Anger, on Leisure, on Clemency

  • Essays, Volume 2
  • By: Seneca
  • Narrated by: James Cameron Stewart
  • Length: 6 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 48

'On Anger' is one of Seneca's most important essays. At some length he investigates the nature of anger: how and why it emerges, the effect it has on the individual and those to whom it is directed, and how to manage it and prevent it even from arising. For, Seneca considers, anger simply serves no purpose - it does not bring courage in war, prevent others misbehaving or punish miscreants. In short it has a negative effect on all. In 'On Leisure' he takes a short look at what is really meant by the term.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Stewart's narrations are very good

  • By Ron Peters on 01-05-18

Stewart's narrations are very good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-18

For this collection, specifically, it is nice to have On Anger, but On Clemency is an embarrassment for Seneca, and should have been replaced by something else (it's just a piece in which he sucks up to Nero and completely negates his own Stoic teachings in the process). In general it's a bad thing that audible.com books are always simply divided into Chapter 1, Chapter 2, etc. I have to spend large amounts of time bookmarking and annotating my purchases so I can find things in the way you are supposed to be able to, e.g., On Anger, Book 3. Lastly, listeners should be able to share these bookmark and annotation collections with one another, so we don't all have to re-invent the wheel individually.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • SPQR

  • A History of Ancient Rome
  • By: Mary Beard
  • Narrated by: Phyllida Nash
  • Length: 18 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,778
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,533
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,510

In SPQR, world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even 2,000 years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Reexamination of the History of Rome

  • By Christopher on 12-17-15

Mary Beard always informative and entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-17

The history of Rome and the empire is so sweeping that it tends to be either a series of greatest hits vignettes or offers an overly idiosyncratic choice of focus. Mary Beard walks this fine line quite nicely, offering a nice cross-section of points of focus and a combination of wise summaries and interesting and illustrative pieces of modern research to support her claims concerning current trends in thinking about Roman history. All in all an excellent addition to a large literature.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Manual

  • A Philosopher's Guide to Life
  • By: Epictetus, Ancient Renewal, Sam Torode
  • Narrated by: Sam Torode
  • Length: 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 396
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 338
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336

Epictetus (c. AD 50-135) was a former Roman slave (he was also lame in one leg, and walked with a crutch) who went on to become a great teacher. His philosophy, Stoicism, was practical, not theoretical - aimed at relieving human suffering here and now. The Manual is a collection of Epictetus' essential teachings and pithy sayings, compiled by one of his students.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best book to live by.

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-05-18

Nice to have a modern translation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-17

Any additional comments?

I already bought a copy of the Discourses and Enchiridion, but it is handy having a short, modern rephrasing of the Handbook.

  • Parallel Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans

  • By: Plutarch
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 83 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152

Plutarch (c. AD 46-AD 120) was born to a prominent family in the small Greek town of Chaeronea, about 20 miles east of Delphi in the region known as Boeotia. His best known work is the Parallel Lives, a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, arranged in pairs to illuminate their common moral virtues and vices. The surviving lives contain 23 pairs, each with one Greek life and one Roman life as well as four unpaired single lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • For the Very Dedicated

  • By John Pinkerton on 03-13-18

A classic among classics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-17

What does Charlton Griffin bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The narration of Charlton Griffon is good - well-paced and clearly enunciated - though he tends to average about one misread word per page; it's not very distracting.

Any additional comments?

Happily audible.com uses the same edition I own in hard copy - Modern Library, translated by John Dryden, revised by Arthur Hugh Clough. Or luckily, rather, since audible.com is bad about telling you which translation of a classical work you are buying.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Metamorphoses

  • By: Ovid
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 16 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 391
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 257

An undeniable masterpiece of Western Civilization, The Metamorphoses is a continuous narrative that covers all the Olympian legends, seamlessly moving from one story to another in a splendid panorama of savage beauty, charm, and wit. All of the gods and heroes familiar to us are represented. Such familiar legends as Hercules, Perseus and Medusa, Daedelus and Icarus, Diana and Actaeon, and many others, are breathtakingly recreated.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Charlton Griffin's Metamorphoses

  • By Coach of Alva on 01-23-14

A magnificent overview of Greco-Roman mythology

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-17

I would have loved to have met and spoken with Ovid, especially after he was banished from Rome. What a wit and a charmer he must have been! :-) His Arts of Love will always be one of my favourites, even though it often gets put down by critics.

I think the Horace Gregory translation, used here, is the best. And it is also one of the cheapest, available in the Signet Classic edition. (I wish they would tell you, right in the description, that this is the Gregory translation!)

Charlton Griffin has a great voice, and does a good job here. He does make mistakes in his reading, which were not corrected in this production, and makes a noticeable number of mispronunciations, which are mildly distracting.

In my opinion, this translation is so good that it makes up for any of these deficiencies, and then some. I think this is the best you can buy on audio from here.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • On the Shortness of Life, On the Happy Life, and Other Essays

  • Essays, Volume 1
  • By: Seneca
  • Narrated by: James Cameron Stewart
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 96
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 93

As former tutor and adviser to Emperor Nero, philosopher and statesman Seneca was acutely aware of how short life can be - his own life was cut short when the emperor ordered him to commit suicide (for alleged involvement in a conspiracy). And Seneca proved true to his words - his lifelong avowal to Stoicism enabled him to conduct himself with dignity to the end. During his rich and busy life, Seneca wrote a series of essays that have advised and enriched the lives of generations down to the present day.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Stoic Has Spoken!

  • By Andreea Marin on 03-05-17

Seneca and James Cameron Stewart both excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-23-17

A good selection of Seneca's Essays and Dialogs; it's especially nice to have On The Firmness of the Wise Man included, since it is not widely available in print.

  • Meditations

  • By: Marcus Aurelius, George Long - translator, Duncan Steen - translator
  • Narrated by: Duncan Steen
  • Length: 5 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,932
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,354
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,302

One of the most significant books ever written by a head of State, the Meditations are a collection of philosophical thoughts by the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180 ce). Covering issues such as duty, forgiveness, brotherhood, strength in adversity and the best way to approach life and death, the Meditations have inspired thinkers, poets and politicians since their first publication more than 500 years ago. Today, the book stands as one of the great guides and companions - a cornerstone of Western thought.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is a masterpiece. Most enriching. So thankful for it.

  • By Viviana on 02-05-16

Well spoken, good translation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-17

Marcus Aurelius is not my favourite Stoic writer; I prefer Seneca. Marcus can be glum and repetitive. I'm aware that he wrote for himself, in personal journals, not for public consumption. Yet we are a public audience of Marcus; an as a public listener I like Seneca better.

I wish that Audible.com would be more careful of two things in its Classical recordings:

a) always letting the purchaser know clearly which translation they are buying, and

b) following the traditional conventions for noting books and section divisions.

In this reading, for example, none of numbered sections within books are stated, and the narrator often runs one section into the next without pause, making it unnecessarily hard to keep things straight.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

The Iliad audiobook cover art
  • The Iliad

  • By: Robert Fagles (translator), Homer
  • Narrated by: Derek Jacobi, Maria Tucci
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133

Robert Fagles brings the energy of contemporary language of this 2,700-year-old epic, while maintaining the drive and metric music of Homer's poetry, as well as the impact and nuance of Homer's mesmerizing repeated phrases.

As a scholar, Fagles praises Homer's directness and simplicity, the breadth of his imagination, and the power of his song. As a translator, he brilliantly captures these very qualities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful translation and reading, but abridged

  • By Tad Davis on 11-16-08

Excellent but abridged

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-17

Any additional comments?

Somehow I didn't notice that this is an abridged version. Dazzled by the thought of listening to Derek Jacobi I suppose! :-) It's wonderfully well read and an excellent translation. Too bad it ain't all there!

  • The Enchiridion & Discourses

  • By: Epictetus
  • Narrated by: Haward B. Morse
  • Length: 13 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 236
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 218
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 214

The Enchiridion is the famous manual of ethical advice given in the second century by the Stoic philosopher Epictetus. Born to a Greek slave, Epictetus grew up in the environment of the Roman Empire and, having been released from bonds of slavery, became a stoic in the tradition of its originators, Zeno (third Century BCE) and Seneca (first century CE).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Inspiration from thousands of years ago

  • By Jose on 07-30-17

Good translations, nicely narrated

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I like Long's translation of the Discourses. In hard copy I read the Robin Hard version, but half the time I prefer the literary quality and pithy 'zing' of Long's text. So far my favourite reader of Stoic works is James Cameron Stewart, but Howard B. Morse does a creditable job. This is, in any case, the only Audible product that includes both the the Discourses and the Handbook (plus it is unabridged), which makes it desirable.

If you could give The Enchiridion & Discourses a new subtitle, what would it be?

It isn't things themselves that disturb people, but the judgments they form about them.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful