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Philo

San Diego, CA, United States
  • 456
  • reviews
  • 1,802
  • helpful votes
  • 461
  • ratings
  • Risk Management

  • The Ultimate Guide to Financial Risk Management as Applied to Corporate Finance
  • By: Greg Shields
  • Narrated by: Michael Reaves
  • Length: 2 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 27

If you're looking for a practical audiobook that provides useful knowledge about risk-management concepts, then pay attention.... 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Hits a lot of bases clearly, broad but not deep

  • By Philo on 10-12-18

Hits a lot of bases clearly, broad but not deep

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-18

This book does a pretty remarkable job as a short title in covering so many ideas, tools and approaches, for finance. What is "beta"? What are "the Greeks?" It ranges quite far and wide within the sub-field, with basic definitions and examples. A loose familiarity with this field and its concepts would maximize the listener's benefit. The narrator, with one o;f the stronger baritone voices I've heard, is competent.

  • Social Media: Dominating Strategies for Social Media Marketing with Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, LinkedIn and Instagram

  • Social Media, Network Marketing, Book 1
  • By: Michael Richards
  • Narrated by: Martin James
  • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 154
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 136
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 134

Do you want to dominate social media? Have you ever wondered if there was an exact blueprint on how to dominate social media marketing? Do you want to grow your followers and your brand? Are you looking to increase your online presence? When you download Social Media: Dominating Strategies for Social Media Marketing with Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, LinkedIn and Instagram, your followers and social media will start to grow rapidly!

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good info for a beginner in social media.

  • By Jon Colston on 07-08-15

Very basic, a bit dated, but good coverage

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-18

This is a fine first look. It is showing its age, but is an OK point of entry.

  • The Fixer

  • My Adventures Saving Startups from Death by Politics
  • By: Bradley Tusk
  • Narrated by: Bradley Tusk
  • Length: 4 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

Most new startups today are in highly regulated industries with strong incumbents - transportation, hotels, drones, energy, gaming, education, health care, cannabis, finance, liquor, insurance. The more startups try to snatch a piece of the establishment's pie, the more they risk running into a political wall. That's where Bradley Tusk comes in. As Tusk writes, "Every new company is essentially a tech startup. And when you disrupt someone in any industry, they don't say thank you. They punch you in the nose. These are the lessons startups need to learn to punch back and survive the clutches of politics." 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A whole layer of how things work

  • By Philo on 10-11-18

A whole layer of how things work

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

This book stands apart in a field of "how to do entrepreneurship now!" books. This one fills a lot of gaps, reminding me of topics I strive to include in my business law classes I just don't see elsewhere in the college business curriculum. There is no substitute for hearing descriptions form someone who has been in the cockpit in real situations and solved problems. A little bit of entertainment spices it up too. Other reviewers point out that this may be sort of a self-ad for the guy (in their perception). Some have expressed distress at the (what they seem to perceive as) sleezy world of how things get done. I wasn't fazed by these aspects, if they were there. Often a good book, for me, is a substitute for actual experience I can't get at such low cost elsewhere. This book makes the grade.
As for the stories, there is enough red meat to keep it moving, with big names in recent politics and entrepreneurship. Rod Blagojevich as described here was startlingly inappropriate to be Governor of Illinois -- just constantly absentee and willfully clueless. Michael Bloomberg is the opposite (as described), a guy who makes checklists and then actually makes their items happen, assuming one has some common ground with his kinds of aims.
There was common ground I found with this author, in my earlier days of lawyering: it is very hard to go along without collecting allies and opponents, one cannot always choose one's employers (especially earlier in one's career) and one had best have one's explanations crafted and ready for various past doings and associations, as the ongoing marketing (PR and politicking, the core of this book) is all part of the game. So, the author's slants on particular people perhaps deserve second and third looks, from other observers. No problem there. These stories are colorful and well-told.

  • Rainy Forest

  • Ambient Nature Sounds
  • By: Greg Cetus
  • Narrated by: Greg Cetus
  • Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

This recording features continuous sounds of rainfall with faint birdsong and gentle forest rustle. This recording will set a perfect background for relaxation, meditation or quiet office work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love the atmospherics -- amazing "white noise"

  • By Philo on 10-11-18

Love the atmospherics -- amazing "white noise"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

I can close my eyes and be somewhere else completely. This is nice, on demand. I imagine my brain waves reset accordingly.

  • American Default

  • The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle over Gold
  • By: Sebastian Edwards
  • Narrated by: Timothy Andrés Pabon
  • Length: 9 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7

The American economy is strong in large part because nobody believes that America would ever default on its debt. Yet in 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt did just that, when in a bid to pull the country out of depression, he depreciated the US dollar in relation to gold, effectively annulling all debt contracts. American Default is the story of this forgotten chapter in America's history. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I was startled by this. Details yield insight

  • By Philo on 10-11-18

I was startled by this. Details yield insight

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

This was, for me, a new deeper dive into the nuts and bolts of the New Deal, and the interplay between the branches of the federal government. Some stretches were long in detail, but I don't mind. It was all in service of better insight. I was stunned to learn that the USA had indeed, to my reading, defaulted on its own solemn obligations. And the US Supreme Court's decision blessing this was a mealy-mouthed bit of lawyerly legerdemain if I have ever seen it. And I have seen (and probably practiced) enough to know it when I see it. When is a promise not a promise? When it is too darned inconvenient to keep it, and I still have yet to see the exception to that. When an emergency is perceived, this government can do amazing back-flips and sleights-of-hand to re-paper the whole thing. I expect I haven't seen my last round of that either -- I see it on the horizon yet again now. Creditors despite their best efforts to hedge the risks will be stiffed yet again.
I am gradually getting a bit more accustomed to this narrator who is far from my favorite. My problem with him is, his voice is very soft and smoothed and mid-rangey, and to my old ears, lacks punch. This is especially a problem when there are any ambient noises, as when I am walking outdoors with traffic nearby. He must be cranked up more than any other narrator (of any gender) I can think of.

  • Every Man a King

  • A Short, Colorful History of American Populists
  • By: Chris Stirewalt
  • Narrated by: Chris Stirewalt
  • Length: 4 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 31

American populism has always been home to a fascinating assortment of charismatic leaders, characters, kooks, cranks, and sometimes charlatans who have led the charge of ordinary folks who have gotten wise to the ways of the swamp. Every Man a King tells the stories of America's populist leaders, from Andrew Jackson and Teddy Roosevelt to Ross Perot, Pat Buchanan, and Donald Trump. It is a rollicking history of an American attitude that has shaped not only our current moment, but also the long struggle over who gets to define the truths we hold to be self evident. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Walk Down Memory Lane

  • By Sushiqueen on 10-14-18

Good angle on US history, brisk but thoughtful

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

I enjoyed this one plenty. I was vaguely aware of the basic histories of these men, but this was good to hear end-to-end, and with some good quotes and details. It provides heaps of context for the current presidency, tying those various threads together better than any other account I have seen. I have better comprehension of current politics as a result. The author was a fine narrator of his work.

  • Crashes and Crises: Lessons from a History of Financial Disasters

  • By: Connel Fullenkamp, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Connel Fullenkamp
  • Length: 11 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21

Professor Connel Fullenkamp of Duke University guides listeners through four centuries of economic disasters - from tulip mania in the 1600s to the Great Recession of 2007-2009. Each of his 24 lectures covers a notable incident of financial misfortune or folly that is worthy of a Hollywood thriller.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • BEST explainer out there hits a new high level

  • By Philo on 09-22-18

BEST explainer out there hits a new high level

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-18

When a professor has really done his/her homework, really reached comprehension and then carefully crafted descriptions, and is gifted to begin with, things of astonishing complexity can be explained with great clarity. Such is the case here, non-stop, end to end. Are you curious about John Law's innovations and misadventures crashing the French economy circa 1720? The South Sea Bubble? The US banking system, into and including the genesis of the Fed? On and on it goes, marching right into the present, with not a word out of place. I have read, heard and seen accounts of all these things, and none has come close to this crystal clear, yet complete, yet compact, delivery. My lesson has been, in the world of financial books, often a story (probably because of the economics of book publishing, or mediocre editing) is stretched into the format of a 250-page book which can make the story less clear than it needed to be. Prof. Fullenkamp explains each segment batter than many of these books, in a concise way that makes it even more understandable than the big tomes do. I could have saved myself a lot of time and money had I gone straight to this one. But it is a tremendous refresher, meanwhile surpassing the earlier accounts I have seen, or pulling each of the stories together neatly. I was a fan of Fullenkamp already, having never been disappointed by him. But he surprised me, on the upside, here. That is a high bar to start with. (Let me be clear where some raving reviewers aren't: I have no affiliation with Great Courses or this Professor, and have never met him, etc.)
Something that works great here is the very good mix between colorful stories and little tutorials, where needed, at a basic level but crystal-clear, on the nuts and bolts of the deals and financial innovations involved. These are among the best basic explanations I have heard. Learn (with very simple math that does not need video or graphics, the voice works great(, the workings (and sometime misfires) of swaps, puts, VAR, convergence trades, actions of rogue traders, etc. A pattern I notice that makes the explanation crystal clear is that the good professor almost always boils everything down (in the course of the story) to its simplest possible view: if Situation A happened the trader would make money, but if Situation B happened the losses would explode -- in ways very readily understood. We see that the crash side of things comes into play most often when so;me sort of large one-way bet has been made, whether by a single trader or by a whole industry or sector of the economy.
Now, if audible would release Great Courses / Fullenkamp's "Understanding Investments," we could almost call it a day.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Borrowed Time

  • Two Centuries of Booms, Busts, and Bailouts at Citi
  • By: James Freeman, Vern McKinley
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 11 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8

To save the economy and keep Citi afloat in 2008, the government provided huge infusions of cash through multiple bailouts that frustrated and angered the American public. But, as Wall Street Journal writer James Freeman and financial expert Vern McKinley reveal, the 2008 crisis was just one of many disasters Citi has experienced since its founding more than 200 years ago. In Borrowed Time they reveal Citi’s disturbing history of instability and government support. It’s a story that neither Citi nor Washington wants told.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Far-away best US banks-finance story I've seen

  • By Philo on 09-18-18

Far-away best US banks-finance story I've seen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-18

Citi becomes a sort of prism through which to view the whole history of US banks, their fortunes, and their entanglements with the federal government. (It ranges into broader history, but still centers on its story. If you want a still wider, systematic explanation of the banking system, and other topics lateral from that, the clearest explanations I have found are in another recent release here, Crashes and Crises: Lessons from a History of Financial Disasters, by Great Courses/Connell Fullenkamp. This at one point really maps the earlier US banking system brilliantly.) But back to this one: The portraits of bankers and politicians are incredible, for better and worse. We start with Moses Taylor, first City Bank leader and a banker of amazing probity and stature, building City into a private safe haven for savers in times of panic and financial stress (when various governmental props weren't there). His methods provide a perfect textbook case of sound banking business and risk management. There follows the succession of Stillman, Sunshine Charlie Mitchell, and onward through Wriston and so on, a succession of leaders increasingly picked apparently through blue-chip leaders' "man-crushes" on young proteges who lost the art and science of banking in increasing favor of charm and cronyism with government. Along the way, some detail is given to Citi's funding some awful, ill-timed, vainglorious and idiotic deals of one Donald J. Trump. This train of fiascos and blue-chip bungling comes to its final pratfall (to date) in the 2008 crash, with a massive taxpayer bailout to a company in execrably bad condition. The whole story is magnificently told, sharply-etched in well-chosen details. I appreciate the author's having paid closer attention to some critics of the Fed and elite bankers, I had dismissed. My opinion of many major public figures in our recent times was altered by this book, and not for the better. In all, USA's large-scale financial story is told here, often with the best compact descriptions of big events and turning-points I have seen (e.g., the 1907 panic, the Fed's creation, and the Pecora hearings in the Depression in which National City's Charlie Mitchell was the stage villain). If financial history has any interest for you, I cannot highly enough recommend this book.

  • Crash Bang Wallop

  • The Inside Story of London's Big Bang and a Financial Revolution That Changed the World
  • By: Iain Martin
  • Narrated by: Matt Addis
  • Length: 11 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2

Published to mark the 30th anniversary of the financial revolution known as Big Bang, Crash Bang Wallop tells the gripping story of how the changes introduced in the 1980s in the City of London transformed our world. Attitudes to money and the way we measure value and status were completely reshaped by Big Bang, and it had an extraordinary impact on politics, on style, on technology, on the class system, on questions of public ownership, and on the geography of London.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Lively financial-cultural history of the City

  • By Philo on 09-13-18

Lively financial-cultural history of the City

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-13-18

I found this pleasurable, listenable and informative all through. The writer shows his roots via a journalistic flair. I like the very compact explanations of important financial events. I love to hear the Mother Tongue, the King's English, so well used and spoken. The only thing I would change is, I would shift to just a bit less of the cultural stuff (always a peeve to hear overmuch about whatever baubles the latest generation of young Turks were flashing at any moment), and a few more financial nuts and bolts. But the political and cultural parts are, to some extent, essential to the comprehension of it all. And, the headline events are all here: the fall of Barings, Thatcher's rise and fall, all that.
As the author observes, this is yet another moment in which the City faces an existential crisis and must reinvent itself.

  • Blockchain and the Law

  • The Rule of Code
  • By: Primavera De Filippi, Aaron Wright
  • Narrated by: Teri Schnaubelt
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 3

Blockchain technology could affect governance itself by supporting new organizational structures that promote more democratic and participatory decision making. Primavera De Filippi and Aaron Wright acknowledge this potential and urge the law to catch up. That is because disintermediation - a blockchain's greatest asset - subverts critical regulation. By cutting out middlemen, such as online operators and multinational corporations, blockchains run the risk of undermining the capacity of governmental authorities to supervise activities in banking, commerce, law, and other vital areas.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Big on concepts, big picture, fundamentals

  • By Philo on 09-07-18

Big on concepts, big picture, fundamentals

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

People who have dug deep into this field and the legal concepts will be drumming their fingers for awhile, because the book starts from ground zero of understanding, and builds toward the legal facets. The view is mostly more from 30,000 feet, as in, getting a deep understanding of where we are and where things can go, rather than nuts and bolts of threading through existing laws. But this is, I think, necessary, as this field is very much under construction. As I write, today, a couple major banks pulled back from creating crypto trading desks, and prices of the major coins plunged. Investors seem to be wondering if, when and how crypto will get traction and scale in the real (mainstream, lawful) economy. So, I want this kind of broader understanding and context to approach things as they unfold. Within its scope, the book is a model of clarity, and should be readily understandable to the relative novice. The treatment of smart contracts is the most complete and thoughtful I have seen (for such a popular format as this) -- helpfully keeping a neutral voice with strong critical thinking and exposure of flaws, unlike the (conflict-riddled, uncritical, "gee whiz") boosterism I have mostly seen elsewhere. This book is one of the best entry points I have seen into its subjects.