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G. Dorrough

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 223
  • helpful votes
  • 11
  • ratings
  • All the Ugly and Wonderful Things

  • A Novel
  • By: Bryn Greenwood
  • Narrated by: Jorjeana Marie
  • Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,523
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,091
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,078

As the daughter of a drug dealer, Wavy knows not to trust people, not even her own parents. It's safer to keep her mouth shut and stay out of sight. Struggling to raise her little brother, Donal, eight-year-old Wavy is the only responsible adult around. Obsessed with the constellations, she finds peace in the starry night sky above the fields behind her house until one night her stargazing causes an accident. After witnessing his motorcycle wreck, she forms an unusual friendship with one of her father's thugs, Kellen, a tattooed ex-con with a heart of gold.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Life Can Be Ugly

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-23-17

Love Story...yes. Pedophilia...no.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-18

This is first and foremost a love story. Both Wavy and Kellen found something in each other that they needed and no one else could or would give it to them. They had a mutually beneficial relationship, not to mention a mutually consensual one. Almost every encounter of a sexual nature between them was instigated by the young girl Wavy. A person could make the argument that Wavy is the one who took advantage of Kellen's innocence. The people who are saying this book glorifies pedophilia are just plain wrong. If anything Wavy, the young girl in the story, takes sexual advantage of Kellen, the older male. Yes there are parts of the book that will make you uncomfortable but that is what good literature should do. If you can't handle books that take you out of your comfort zone go read a Danielle Steele or Dean Kontz novel.

  • A Little Life

  • A Novel
  • By: Hanya Yanagihara
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 32 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,921
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,214
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9,220

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I had to call in SAD to work

  • By Angela on 10-17-15

Loved it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-16

Would you listen to A Little Life again? Why?

No, once is enough

Who was your favorite character and why?

Jude St Francis

Any additional comments?

I loved this book. Devastating and tragic. It is very well written and though it does drag on in places the parts where it does are at least thought provoking. I'm a little baffled by the preponderance of reviewers who said they loved the book but couldn't recommend it. Why? Because it was disturbing. What's wrong with that? Why is being disturbed by a book any less of an emotional response than laughing. I for one would rather read a book that disturbs me. This is a book I will be thinking about long after I have put it down and one of those books that makes it very difficult to choose your next read because you just know nothing is going to live up to it.

  • The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck

  • How to Stop Spending Time You Don't Have with People You Don't Like Doing Things You Don't Want to Do
  • By: Sarah Knight
  • Narrated by: Sarah Knight
  • Length: 3 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,682
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,492
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,493

Are you stressed out, overbooked, and underwhelmed by life? Fed up with pleasing everyone else before you please yourself? It's time to stop giving a f--k. This brilliant, hilarious, and practical parody of Marie Kondo's best seller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up explains how to rid yourself of unwanted obligations, shame, and guilt - and give your f--ks instead to people and things that make you happy.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Got the gist in 30 mins

  • By spicyhands on 03-04-16

I wanted to like it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-08-16

What could Sarah Knight have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Get someone else to narrate it

Would you be willing to try another one of Sarah Knight’s performances?

No

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No

Any additional comments?

I really wanted to like this book, I mean come on, The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a ****?. You gotta love it. But I had to stop after 30 minutes and here are the four reasons why.

1. The author, Sarah Knight, goes to great pains to explain how her book was inspired by Marie Kondo and her book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and how her book was modeled after it. I am a great fan of Marie Kondo's book and this claim is one reason I decided to try Ms. Knight's book. I will just say, if imitation is the sincerest form of flattery then Ms. Kondo need not be flattered.

2. I found that I already don't give a ****. I mean, if this was a college course I would have passed with honors. In fact, I could have written the book, well if it wasn't for the words and the actual writing part, but I could have come up with the concept for it. She didn't impart anything to me that I didn't already know.

3. The narrator (also the author) has a serious case of "vocal fry". For those who don't know what vocal fry is think Britney Spears or the Kardashians. “Vocal fry” is that guttural growl at the back of the throat, as a Valley girl might sound if she had been shouting herself hoarse at a rave all night. The less charitable refer to it privately as painfully nasal, and to young women in conversation sounding like ducks quacking. “Vocal fry” has joined more traditional young-women voice mannerisms such as run-ons, breathiness and the dreaded question marks in sentences (known by linguists as uptalk). Anyway, I could probably have lived with it if the the information being imparted transcended the annoying voice mannerism, but it did not.

4. At some point about a half hour in the author gives some examples of what she gives a **** about and what she doesn't give a **** about. Three examples:

1 - Don't give a **** - A nuclear Iran. Give a **** - Climate Change
2 - Don't give a **** - College Football. Give a **** - Campus Rape
3 - Don't give a **** - The Pope. Give a **** - Reese Witherspoon's latest Instagram

It was at this point I decided I didn't give a **** and gave up.

168 of 192 people found this review helpful

  • The Fountainhead

  • By: Ayn Rand
  • Narrated by: Christopher Hurt
  • Length: 32 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,033
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,220
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,245

One of the 20th century's most challenging novels of ideas, The Fountainhead champions the cause of individualism through the story of a gifted young architect who defies the tyranny of conventional public opinion. The struggle for personal integrity in a world that values conformity above creativity is powerfully illustrated through three characters: Howard Roarke, a genius; Gail Wynand, a newspaper mogul and self-made millionaire; and Dominique Francon, a devastating beauty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Fountainhead

  • By Zachary on 06-04-10

Move to the top of my "Best Books Ever Read" list

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-11

Anyone who believes in personal responsibility and being the primary beneficiary of their own ingenuity and hard work should read this book. Come to think of it, maybe the people who don't believe in those things should read it too. They might learn something. Everything about this book is superb. From the ideals it espouses, to the writing, to the narration, it was a pleasure from beginning to end. Any man who does not aspire to be like Howard Roark or any woman who does not aspire to be like Dominique Francon is just one more of the milling masses who want to live off the backs of others. I read Atlas Shrugged probably 25 years ago and thought it was just okay. After reading The Fountainhead I revisited Atlas Shrugged and realized I was just to young and naive to understand it back then. After a lifetime of seeing mediocrity rewarded and excellence punished, I now understand it. Thank you Ayn Rand, wherever you are, for having the courage to write these two books.

  • Cleopatra

  • A Life
  • By: Stacy Schiff
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles
  • Length: 14 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,102
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 670
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 685

Her palace shimmered with onyx, garnets, and gold, but was richer still in political and sexual intrigue. Above all else, Cleopatra was a shrewd strategist and an ingenious negotiator. Though her life spanned fewer than 40 years, it reshaped the contours of the ancient world. Cleopatra appears to have had sex with only two men. They happen, however, to have been Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A pretty good listen.

  • By Shaun on 04-21-11

Approach this book with caution

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-10

An interesting read (or listen) but hardly an objective view of history. It is apparent from the outset that Schiff is a woman with an ax to grind and will not allow the facts to get in the way. Her overriding theme of every negative thing ever written about Cleopatra being false and every positive thing true is at first only annoying but quickly becomes tedious. She takes to task everyone from ancient historians Plutarch and Dio, to Shakespeare and Shaw for supposition, personal prejudices and outright fiction in their writings about Cleopatra and then merrily does the same for over 300 pages. Worse yet, she happily credits those historians whenever they prop up her slant on the subject and disingenuously discredits them when they do not. In the end this is just another persons take on a subject and time that there is very little actual documented accounts.

55 of 70 people found this review helpful