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John Parker

  • 28
  • reviews
  • 20
  • helpful votes
  • 37
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  • Spymaster

  • By: Brad Thor
  • Narrated by: Armand Schultz
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,384
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,213
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,201

Across Europe, a secret organization has begun attacking diplomats. Back in the United States, a foreign ally demands the identity of a highly placed covert asset. In the balance hang the ingredients for all-out war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thor’s on top

  • By David Ginaitis on 07-03-18

Another masterful thriller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-18

Brad Thor keeps on delivering! If you're a Thor fan, this latest installment will not disappoint.

  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 198,958
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 185,769
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185,372

At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, Ready Player One is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I’m sorry I waited so long to read this book.

  • By Julie W. Capell on 05-27-14

A Young Adult Novel for a Much Older Audience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-18

RPO is billed as a "young adult novel," and on a general story and character depth level, it's every bit of that. But it really isn't for them. Sure, someone who is, say, about 14 now may enjoy the story, but this book is really for us... we incredibly lucky souls who knew what it was to grow up as nerds in the 80s, loving everything from Star Wars to Schoolhouse Rock to Duran Duran. This book is a love letter to everything wonderful about that era, and everything wonderful in us.

Get it. Listen to it. And when your kids ask you what you're smiling about (as you will be frequently, if you're anything like me)...tell them. If they read it or listen to it, maybe they'll ask you about it. I hope so. We got to experience a time that was nothing short of magical. Maybe through this, those who came after can experience a little of it, too.

Who knows? They may get to know you a little better. And knowing is half the battle.

  • Mistrial

  • An Inside Look at How the Criminal Justice System Works...and Sometimes Doesn't
  • By: Mark Geragos, Pat Harris
  • Narrated by: Mike Dawson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 288
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 265
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263

The American legal system changed dramatically when the OJ Simpson trial became a television-ratings bonanza. Now it's all crime, all the time, from tabloid news to police procedurals. Americans now know more about the criminal justice system than ever before. Or do they?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eye Opening and Entertaining

  • By C. Pardon on 02-22-18

A fascinating window into an opaque system

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-17

Mark Geragos' law firm has obviously -- if you've been conscious the last thirty years -- had a very storied practice, and been in the thick of some of the biggest "screaming headlines" cases in recent US history.

Defense attorneys are subject to a great deal of scrutiny, scorn, rumor, conjecture, and mystery, more so than probably any other functionaries of the US criminal justice system. They are probably the least understood by the lay public, though they are perhaps the most vital part of the whole system. Like politicians, people look at defense attorneys and wonder, "What do they *really* think?"

Wonder no more. Geragos and Harris turn their keen legal minds and decades of experience toward the system itself -- the good, the bad, the ugly, the confusing, the interesting, the frustrating, and the absurdly funny. This will be one I listen to more than once.

I dinged the audio book on the performance because while the reading was entirely acceptable, the reader's voice is a bad fit for audio books. Imagine having the "epic movie trailer voice guy" reading and entire book in his epic movie trailer voice, and you'll understand what I mean. No offense to him; he would *rock* animation or video game voiceovers, but for an audio book, I personally prefer a more soothing experience.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Within Arm's Length

  • A Secret Service Agent's Definitive Inside Account of Protecting the President
  • By: Dan Emmett
  • Narrated by: Kevin Foley
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 114
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 106

Dan Emmett was just eight years old when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. The events surrounding the president's death shaped the course of young Emmett's life as he set a goal of becoming a U.S. Secret Service agent-one of a special group of people willing to trade their lives for that of the president, if necessary. Within Arm's Length is a revealing and compelling inside look at the Secret Service and the elite Presidential Protective Division (PPD).

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not What I Was Expecting

  • By VC on 07-07-16

A fascinating behind-the-scenes account

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-17

There are those rare, hard-charging kind people who are able to meet any challenge head on, no matter the hardships. Regardless of what they do, they make it their business to be the very best at it. Dan Emmett is one of these individuals, and his storied career provides a unique and fascinating insight into the largely mysterious world of those who protect the occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

  • Tom Clancy True Faith and Allegiance

  • A Jack Ryan Novel, Book 17
  • By: Mark Greaney
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 19 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,075
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,580
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,555

It begins with a family dinner in Princeton, New Jersey. After months at sea, US Navy commander Scott Hagan, captain of the USS James Greer, is on leave when he is attacked by an armed man in a crowded restaurant. Hagan is shot, but he manages to fight off the attacker. Though severely wounded, the gunman reveals he is a Russian whose brother was killed when his submarine was destroyed by Commander Hagan's ship. Hagan demands to know how the would-be assassin knew his exact location, but the man dies before he says more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • New Faith In The Series - Cyber Terrorism & Islamic State

  • By Derek on 12-07-16

Another superb Campus novel!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-19-17

Mark Greaney really has taken the Clancy mantle to even greater heights than the master himself. This is yet another fast-paced, action-packed thriller. Scott Brick's performance is, of course, the usual top shelf caliber reading that has made him a legend in the Audible universe.

  • Redshirts

  • A Novel with Three Codas
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16,300
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,275
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15,257

Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Universal Union Capital Ship Intrepid, flagship of the Universal Union since the year 2456. Life couldn’t be better…until Andrew begins to pick up on the facts that (1) every Away Mission involves some kind of lethal confrontation with alien forces; (2) the ship’s captain, its chief science officer, and the handsome Lieutenant Kerensky always survive these confrontations; and (3) at least one low-ranked crew member is, sadly, always killed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clever, creative, and FUN!

  • By Kent on 04-18-13

Funny, heartfelt, and well-written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-17

You'll never look at the "redshirts" on Star Trek the same way again! Scalzi blends humor, sci-fi, and a real, human story beautifully. I didn't want to stop listening!

  • True Allegiance

  • By: Ben Shapiro
  • Narrated by: Millian Quinteros
  • Length: 7 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 416
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 390
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 390

America is coming apart. An illegal immigration crisis has broken out along America's Southern border, there are race riots in Detroit, a fiery female rancher-turned-militia leader has vowed revenge on the president for his arrogant policies, and the world's most notorious terrorist is planning a massive attack that could destroy the United States as we know it. Meanwhile the president is too consumed by legacy-seeking to see our country's deep peril.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good story, but

  • By BBGator on 04-11-17

Depressing & Accurate

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-18-16

A depressingly astute tale of the left's America taken to its logical conclusion, where everything is about appearances and feelings, and damn integrity or facts. Shapiro shows how a soft and benign looking tyranny is tyranny all the same, and that there will always be those brave few who stand against it. This story is all *too* plausible.

  • The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels

  • By: Alex Epstein
  • Narrated by: Alex Epstein
  • Length: 6 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 931
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 836
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 835

For decades environmentalists have told us that using fossil fuels is a self-destructive addiction that will destroy our planet. Yet by every measure of human well-being, from life expectancy to clean water to climate safety, life has been getting better and better. How can this be? The explanation is that we usually hear only one side of the story. We're taught to think only of the negatives of fossil fuels, their risks and side effects, but not their positives.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Challenging the Status Quo

  • By Ryan E. on 08-20-16

One of the most needed books of our time

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-16

In this book, Epstein very effectively makes the case that fossil fuels are not simply, a dirty, necessary evil, but rather a wonder of human ingenuity that has improved human life in ways almost too numerous and dramatic to be believed.

Mike Rowe ("Dirty Jobs") said in a recent interview that we have more access to information than ever before, yet we are more disconnected from where our food and energy come from than ever before. He couldn't be more correct, and the widespread demonization of both the food and fuel sources, as well as their much-maligned providers, is a direct consequence of this profound ignorance.

"The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels" sets out to correct some of the misgivings, misunderstandings, and flat out misinformation that have led to this sorry state of affairs. It, as well as Baylen Linnekin's "Biting the Hand that Feeds Us," should be companion texts for mandatory reading in schools.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Ghost

  • Confessions of a Counterterrorism Agent
  • By: Fred Burton
  • Narrated by: Tom Weiner
  • Length: 9 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 345
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 221
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 217

For decades, Fred Burton was a key figure in international counterterrorism and domestic spy craft. As a member of the State Department's Diplomatic Security Service in the mid 1980s, he was on the front lines of America's first campaign against terror. Now, in this hard-hitting memoir, Burton emerges from the shadows to reveal who he is, what he has accomplished, and the threats that lurk unseen except by an experienced, world-wise few. Told in a no-holds-barred, gripping, nuanced style, this behind-the scenes account of one counterterrorism agent's life and career is a riveting listen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Masterful, Real-Life Glimpse. Brilliant!

  • By Lew on 06-16-08

Still Timely

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-16

Fred Burton gives a chilling on-the-ground account of the war on terror. If you have any doubts about the kind of monsters the west faces in the many-headed Hydra that is Islamic terrorism, this book should put them to rest. It's a great reminder of the sacrifices--not just of life and limb, but of family and normal life--made by those who dedicate their lives to the hint for these brutal animals.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Rising Sun

  • A Novel
  • By: Michael Crichton
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,526
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,318
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,314

A riveting thriller of corporate intrigue and cutthroat competition between American and Japanese business interests. On the forty-fifth floor of the Nakamoto tower in downtown Los Angeles - the new American headquarters of the immense Japanese conglomerate - a grand opening celebration is in full swing. On the forty-sixth floor, in an empty conference room, the corpse of a beautiful young woman is discovered.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wasn't expecting this to be so interesting!

  • By Mel on 02-05-18

An enduring cautionary tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-16

While the subject and fears expressed regarding Japanese economic supremacy are a bit dated now (the wheel always turns, and the Japanese are having their own economic woes now), the fundamental ideas are timeless. It does seem to be America's natural trajectory to go for the quick fix, the easy buck, and the superficial sound bite at the expense of introspection, long term prosperity, and self interest.

This work was widely criticized at the time for being racist and Japan-bashing (ironic, considering the role that such false accusations play in the novel itself), and indeed, when it was made into a the plot was substantially altered by the studio to make the villain an American for fear of offending the studio's Japanese investors (which would seem to prove the point of the novel). I believe this criticism to be invalid.

15 of 18 people found this review helpful