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  • The Boys in the Boat

  • Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
  • By: Daniel James Brown
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 26,452
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 24,047
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 23,991

Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Do you believe in miracles??

  • By Janice on 07-12-13

(Hidden) History...can be Thrilling!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-16

This book is wonderful on so many levels. Beautifully written, excellently crafted, poignantly nostalgic. There are so many descriptors. Perhaps the best I can think of is realistically unbelievable. It is a book which transcends the label of Nonfiction.

Except for memoir, which enjoys the fact that it so beautifully absorbs the essay genre, I have always held an aversion to nonfiction. Perhaps it was those awful history books foisted upon me during my school years or maybe the lack of literary joy imparted by news magazines. Whatever the case, I have seen nonfiction as a means of collecting information, knowledge, facts rather than as a means of losing myself in a world at the hands of a skilled writer.

Brown changed that for me with “The Boys in the Boat,” an incredibly respectful—I suppose, elegiac—recollection of a group of guys (boys? men?) I had never known of. The book is at times a naturalist depiction of a 1930s world outside the dust of Oklahoma and away from the gray steamy streets of New York City, in the state of Washington. Brown does not ignore the Depression, nor does he forget about Nazi Germany and the imminent war. Rather, he uses them as a means of framing the world from which these boys rose and the enormity and the gravity that their rowing meant to the world they were entering.

At times Brown waxes poetically about the trees and the water and the pastoral challenges of Washington, while at other times he positions the build-up of Nazi Germany as the true showdown awaiting these young boys of muscle, brains, and meager means. The rest of the time, Brown lovingly reintroduces us to a sport which is all but nonexistent to today’s mainstream America. He makes us understand the immense challenge of rowing well, the artistry of crafting the rowing shells, the fellowship of successful rowers (who “swing”), and he brings us into contact with the rowers themselves, not as faceless He-men but as humans, as Americans.

What is so incredibly surprising is that even when we know the outcome of the final race (Brown tells us outright in the Prologue), there is still an enormous sense of suspense throughout the many races depicted. Brown has such a great sense of pacing, taking what was only essentially a 6-minute race and stretching it into a Herculean effort of endurance, helping those of us, who would sit on the side and perhaps feel disappointed by the quick conclusion, to understand just what level of power, stamina, coordination, and heart were required to make the race happen.

I am not much for extreme jingoism (especially not if it costs an included sense of xenophobia), but I have to say this story certainly gave me a real sense of national pride. There’s a sense of ownership. I had nothing to do with their success; in fact, before this book I didn’t even know of their success. But at the end of it, I felt connected to it through my Americanness, through the fact that they are forever part of my shared history.

By the end of the book, I was sorry to leave these men behind, to listen to Brown tick off their deaths one after the other in the Epilogue. It felt as though I was leaving behind once more such an amazing piece of our cultural fabric and history again. I will come back to this book and read it again because it brought me into contact with something that simply felt ‘right.’ It was one of the right things that has happened in and for America, and I want to feel it again.

Narration: the narration is excellent. There is not much to say, other than the narrator seems the most exquisite fit to the material. I have nothing negative to say regarding his reading of Brown’s work.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Fault in Our Stars

  • By: John Green
  • Narrated by: Kate Rudd
  • Length: 7 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,906
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,879
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,982

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning-author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Poignant Story

  • By AudioAddict on 04-25-13

Good, not Bad, not Great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-16

This is a book that probably works well for the young adult readers at whom it is aimed. For me, though, the humor and the attitudes of the characters are too limited by the sense that they are fad-based and will likely not hold up well to the ravages of time. Think of the film “Juno” and how its snarky teenage millennial already seems dated and affected.

The book did make me smirk more than once, and the take on cancer was different and works well to build a sense of empathy, to remove the otherness of those who suffer from cancer’s devastation. I also enjoyed the (mostly unrealistic) level of intelligence of the two central characters.

It is not a bad book; it simply isn’t one I see myself returning to anytime soon unless I think it might be a way to win over the interests of my students at some point.

Narration: I was not especially enthralled with the narration. Kate Rudd emotes and has a pretty good sound for the female protagonist. I also kind of enjoyed her voicing for the exaggerated pompousness of the self-loathing-pretense-laden language of Peter Van Houtem. However, her accents were not good or consistent, and her man voices just sound like a woman making fun of what a “manly” voice sounds like. I don’t know, perhaps there is something sexist to my sentiments, but I just feel like, generally speaking, men doing female character voices tend to work more believably than women doing male characters.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Stand

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 47 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,651
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,659
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,662

This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death. And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides - or are chosen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My First Completed Stephen King Novel

  • By Meaghan Bynum on 02-20-12

Character, Not Horror

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-16

The Stand is an excellent example of Stephen King working in his character-driven story mode rather than the horror-centric medium popularly expected. I became completely attached to most of the disparate central characters and felt more and more glum as the conclusion approached and I knew they were going to leave me.

The only quibble I have with this book is that the final act sort of loses steam and the 'reveal' is not especially satisfying, but that speaks to just how fantastic the opening act is and how well paced the story is as it works its way toward the end. Given how long the audiobook is, that the final few hours are a letdown means that more than 90% of the book remains fantastic, and so I heartily recommend this to any reader--especially non-King fans who are expecting another horror show.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • American Gods: The Tenth Anniversary Edition (A Full Cast Production)

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Ron McLarty, Daniel Oreskes, full cast
  • Length: 19 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43,234
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 40,122
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,082

Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow's best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 10 Years and Still a Fantastic Read

  • By Nightveil on 07-22-11

Plodding and Frayed Story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

I did not like the story, and I disliked nearly every character. That is not to say this is a terrible book. It is full of obscure places and bits of anthropological American history which are fascinating, revealing how little I know of my own country. The prose is beautiful at times, direct, and not distracting.

The plot seemed more like a mechanism for the author’s rambling exploration of the myriad histories that have fallen together to create the scrapbook heap of America’s past. The result was not characterization of likable people but of characters who can pull us through the author’s expansive understanding of America. We, therefore, never truly feel attached to the outcome of anything or anyone (save for the few unexplored supporting characters), and even the anticlimactic outcome of the book only serves to underscore the unimportance of the plot.

Hence, the unexpected revelations that could be shocking are met with, “Meh.” I felt more interested in the non-central-plot immigrant characters whose stories skirted the edges of the story just as they skirted the edges of American society. The vignettes depicting them were far more poignant, more telling, and ultimately more revelatory of America than the rest of the meandering storyline.

I had held out hope that Shadow, our central hero, once awakened by the revelation of what it meant to be alive would actually come alive as a character. But he remained robotic. He developed somewhat by becoming more proactive and less reactive, but the proactive actions he took were not those of a living person. They were those of a character in a book who needed to wrap up the plot so that the story could end.

I like the writing, and I will come back to Gaiman, but this piece left me wanting so much more from him, his story, and the characters.

As for the narration of the audiobook, I liked every voice except for the narrator’s. He was cloyingly redundant in his intonation patterns to the point that it distracted me from the material he was narrating. He had a habit of raising his pitch at the start of a sentence and then quickly falling toward an aloof sarcastic tone at the close of the sentence. I found him off-putting. The other voices in the Full Cast version of the narration excellently portrayed the characters’ physical and emotional traits. I was especially fond of Hinzelmann, despite his dark secret because of just how effectively he was voiced; he also turned out to be one of the most complex and complete characters in the story despite his minor role in the overall plot.

55 of 64 people found this review helpful

  • Bream Gives Me Hiccups

  • By: Jesse Eisenberg
  • Narrated by: Jesse Eisenberg, Hallie Eisenberg, Annapurna Sriram, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 685
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 627
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 625

Taking its title from a group of stories that begin the book, Bream Gives Me Hiccups moves from contemporary LA to the dorm rooms of an American college to ancient Pompeii, throwing the listener into a universe of social misfits, reimagined scenes from history, and ridiculous overreactions. In one piece a tense email exchange between a young man and his girlfriend is taken over by the man's sister, who is obsessed with the Bosnian genocide ("The situation reminds me of a little historical blip called the Karadordevo agreement").

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • the mix of narrative style and form was intriguing

  • By Gaele on 11-13-15

Part Brilliance, Part Droll

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

The performance by both Jesse Eisenberg and the rest of the cast is brilliant, hitting all the right notes in the delivery of both the heartfelt and humorous material.

There are chapters of brilliant incisive humor, and I must say it is the kind of humor that is going to miss for some while it will be spot on--especially for the millenial crowd with whom this brand of humor tends to resonate most right now.

However, there is a particularly difficult chapter to get through where a mentally unstable character exchanges letters with a mentor figure. Not only is it the longest piece in the whole work, but it is the one which drags endlessly as she expresses the most angst-y personality in the most whiny tone possible. She is unbearable. Were it a shorter piece, it might work, but it just drags and drags and effectively takes up what seemed like about a full third of the book. I would have preferred 10 more super-short chapters resembling those which came toward the end of the book in rapid-fire succession.

The book does have some meaningful insights, and the delivery is good, and if the book can be had for a Daily Deal (as I bought it) or for any price less than $4.95, I think it might be worth it, mostly for the performances. Otherwise, I'd just try to pick up a $1 paperback and skip that awful sagging midsection.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Mere Christianity

  • By: C.S. Lewis
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,848
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,102
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,068

One of the most popular and beloved introductions to the concept of faith ever written, Mere Christianity has sold millions of copies worldwide. This audiobook brings together C. S. Lewis' legendary radio broadcasts during the war years, in which he set out simply to "explain and defend the belief that has been common to nearly all Christians at all times."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mere Christianity, complex ideas in simple terms

  • By Linda M. on 01-30-15

Easy to Follow Description of Christianity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

Superb. Writing to inform and to teach at its best. I did not expect something this amazing to come from C. S. Lewis. I know about the Chronicles of Narnia, and for me that has always been the writer I imagined C. S. Lewis to be. This book changes everything. Not only is it informative about Christianity, it is also convincing in how it develops Christianity as the only right response to existence. Not only does it contain countless clear illustrations on incredibly complex theological issues, but it also does so in language that is both elevated and at the same time accessible. Not only is it informative, but it is also a pleasure to read.

I had been wishing to write something that might help those who try to incorrectly pit Science against Religion, but now it seems Mr. Lewis beat me to the punch years before even my father existed. It makes one feel a bit disappointed in oneself, yet at the same time I am glad that someone who was more capable of doing it better than I ever could went on to do it in the first place. What a shame it would have been if this masterpiece were to have been possible while remaining unwritten and the world as a consequence had only my own efforts available to it.

There are points in the book that I think demand clarity or revision in their handling of certain topics (I have already begun the endeavor of dealing with these in writing), and there are also times when even C. S. Lewis’ brilliant writing fails to make clear certain theologically challenging topics—particularly the three-personal God. Still, these minor quibbles can hardly be blamed on Lewis. He had three difficulties facing him: 1) this was written originally as a public radio program to be addressed to the masses; 2) the program was published amid certain challenging sociocultural systems; and 3) unfolding the topic of theology to the masses in a way which can be accessible is an incredibly daunting task in the first place.

I loved this book, and although some of its handling of certain material (specifically homosexuality and marriage) will be unacceptable to some readers, this book offers a fantastic reason to consider the merits of Christianity beyond the absurd box which popular society has placed them in. Society today likes to bury Christianity beneath mounds of political incorrectness and hoards of scientific fact, but after reading Mere Christianity all of these ludicrously irrational arguments fall away leaving the unvarnished truth of what Christianity really is at its core.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Keep Moving

  • And Other Tips and Truths About Aging
  • By: Dick Van Dyke
  • Narrated by: Dick Van Dyke
  • Length: 5 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,640
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,525
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,525

With a fun and folksy way of addressing its audience, Keep Moving serves as an instruction audiobook on how to embrace old age with a positive attitude. The chapters are filled with exclusive personal anecdotes that explore various themes on aging: how to adapt to the physical and social changes, deal with loss of friends and loved ones, stay current, fall in love again, and "keep moving" every day like there's no tomorrow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I didn't want it to end

  • By Debbie on 10-25-15

Refreshing Positive Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

What a tremendously invigorating piece of writing! Having the 89-year-old Dick Van Dyke read his own work with his grandfatherly conversational tone left me feeling as though I was sitting next to him in some comfortable retirement village collecting his pearls of wisdom. It made me more desirous to enjoy my life now as I have it now. It even made me more excited at the prospect of aging.

This is not a piece of literature, but it is full of timeless advice. At times, he was preaching to the choir, and at other times he was providing me with an entirely different perspective to adopt toward certain situations. The way he intertwined his tips for aging well with tidbits of his own life story served to create a remarkably fast-paced uplifting work that left me wanting to dance as much as he dances. This is one of the books that I will certainly return to again when I feel the need for a refreshing perspective on the life I am living.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Power of the Dog

  • By: Don Winslow
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 20 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,613
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,021
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,006

This explosive novel of the drug trade takes you deep inside a world riddled with corruption, betrayal, and bloody revenge. From the streets of New York City to Mexico City and Tijuana to the jungles of Central America, this is the war on drugs like you've never seen it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping Drama

  • By Deborah on 01-06-11

Excellent (and Violent)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

This is not a perfect book, as 5 stars might suggest, but it is still a superb effort. A sprawling drug cartel crime drama that spans much of Latin America, creeps into the cities of California, and even reaches into New York City’s crime syndicate. Perhaps Winslow’s greatest success is that in such a wide-ranging tale made up of players who generally remain faceless participants in distant news stories he is able to create humans. No one is entirely evil—even the most evil villain—and no one is entirely upright—even the most resilient hero. By the end we the audience find ourselves rooting most vigorously for the happiness of a prostitute who has slept with countless Johns and a cold-blooded killer who has killed innumerable marks.

The choices the characters make are morally ambiguous where nothing seems quite right. In fact, perhaps the greatest shortcoming cannot be blamed on Winslow by rather on the human condition, the inescapability of the evil that lurks as an ever-present danger, wherein the destruction of one evil always creates a void which must be filled immediately by another evil that is always more resistant to that which is good. As a result, there is an omnipresent sense of inevitable darkness, and we know deep down that we are complicit and at the same time as helpless as the characters to escape our complicity.

Since the nature of the subject matter calls for a more gritty down-to-earth tone, the language is not particularly literary, but I think that Winslow’s narrator sometimes becomes overly conversational, slipping into valley girl ‘like,’ ‘you know,’ and the like. In the same vein, his fluency in moving between Spanish and English as well as character to character allows the characters’ individuality blossom in the wasteland of the novel’s violent humanity.

For me, though, it is how Winslow weaves real politics and statistics and wars throughout Mexico, Latin America, and southern California (not to mention a brief foray into Sino-American relations) into his story so that not only are we enjoying a captivating character-driven crime drama, but we are also gaining a much more intimate understanding of the complexities of the many-fronted war on terrorism-Communism-fill-in-the-blankism America has been fighting for more than 40 years. Moreover, we discover bits of history with which we generally have little or no knowledge, and we are horrified at both the abhorrent covert actions of our government and the very fact that we knew nothing about those actions. How much more are we unaware of? How do we make enough people aware enough to make change? Most unsettling—is there an ‘enough’?

Narration: Ray Porter is superb. His accents are accurate (to this layman’s ears) and the characters speak as they should and with emotion. The voices clearly delineate each character in the listeners mind (with the exception of women…their voices sounded almost totally interchangeable with the exception of the Irish New Yorker Siobhan). And his narrator’s voice is just perfectly paced with great inflection and his own sense of emotional connection. Absolutely excellent narration. I am not sure I would rate this book so high had I read it without Ray Porter’s narrating.

Quick Additional comment: there are a few scenes of torture that definitely add an R-rating to this fare and are not suitable for those with squeamish stomachs.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

It audiobook cover art
  • It

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Steven Weber
  • Length: 44 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,844
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,235
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,245

They were just kids when they stumbled upon the horror of their hometown. Now, as adults, none of them can withstand the force that has drawn them all back to Derry, Maine, to face the nightmare without end, and the evil without a name.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I thought I was desensitized

  • By Parola138 on 02-19-11

Terrifying Pennywise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-16

Would you listen to It again? Why?

Yes, but it will be awhile given that I had to dedicate 44 hours to the completion of this monster of a book.

Have you listened to any of Steven Weber’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

My first Steven Weber. I would give him a 4.8. He does a pitch-perfect performance of Pennywise, and he does an excellent job of differentiating the cast of characters (including differentiating the child and adult versions of the main characters). The only knock, and it is slight, is that he sometimes gets a little overexuberant during the non-dialogic narrative portions. His voicing just seems a little over-excited, ever so slightly off the mark, during these parts. Otherwise, it is one of the better performances I have heard.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Escape childhood...while you still can.

Any additional comments?

I remember seeing the mini-series and/or movie when I was much younger, and I remember being completely disenchanted and bored by the sudden story shift that happened near the final third of the story, where it seemed completely out of place and also felt like it dragged. Now, after reading the book, the book version makes that whole portion much clearer and seems more in place. Still, this is not my favorite King book because I think it sometimes meanders just a little too far away from the story, dwelling not on the characters, their relationships, or the plot, but instead focusing too much energy on the landscape of Derry.

Also, it may be that this book took me over a month to complete (it's 44 hours!), but I just couldn't figure out the purpose of Beverly, the only prominent female character. I am not a politically correct-type of person and am not interested in pursuing feminist arguments, but her character really seemed to serve no purpose. I was constantly asking myself during the second half, "Why Bev? What does she add? Mike did this, Richie did that...what about Bev?" She seems to be of no importance other to function as sexual tension. Even in light of the final significant event she encourages and takes part in toward the end, I couldn't see her purpose. I still can't figure out why that event was necessary, much less her character.

These are my two quibbles with the story. Still, King nonetheless outdoes himself in creating a universe that is nostalgic for simpler times that were never as simple as we remember them, and he demonstrates such a deft hand in pulling us in with details that make you think, "Whoah! I remember that, totally forgot I thought that way, but I remember thinking that when I was younger!" The story also is masterful in its unwinding, stringing us along, helping us follow how one event from 12 hours earlier connects to the current moment.

Great read, and excellent narration.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Shining

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Campbell Scott
  • Length: 15 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,081
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,681
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,671

Jack Torrance's new job at the Overlook Hotel is the perfect chance for a fresh start. As the off-season caretaker at the atmospheric old hotel, he'll have plenty of time to spend reconnecting with his family and working on his writing. But as the harsh winter weather sets in, the idyllic location feels ever more remote...and more sinister. And the only one to notice the strange and terrible forces gathering around the Overlook is Danny Torrance, a uniquely gifted five-year-old.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • THE FOG OF ANGER

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 06-08-16

dry narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-20-16

I have become quite the Steven King fan of late, but this book didn't do it for me. Regarding the writing, my biggest problem had to do with b the inconsistent voice given to the five year old child who is one of the main characters in the story. To often it makes sudden transitions from thinking and spelling from the perspective of a small boy to that of a grown wise adult. Occasionally, King makes references to how special and beyond his years the child's is, but to often the boy cannot express even a simple vocabulary word (presumably due to his young age), yet at other times his inner vocabulary could rivals that of a young college student. The other major problem with this title came from what I felt was poor narration. The narrator feels emotionless, disconnected, and somewhat robotic in his connection to the material until the final quarter of the story. Honestly, if it wasn't for my trust in Kings storytelling, I would have quit on this book after the first twenty chapters. This is the first audible book I have read that just plain felt long, and I attribute this feeling to the uninspired narration.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful