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Indi Rock

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  • 5
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Evidence of no evidence which convicted a man of murder

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-19

A high paradox wherein a prosecution armed with a literal void of evidence convicted an innocent man. Or is he? Each new piece of evidence shines a penetrating light into the darkness of an 8 year old murder mystery, where nothing disguised itself as tangible evidence, and convinced a jury to bring the ultimate verdict down on the man more than half the public had already convicted without trial. This audio book reveals the hidden structure underneath the "official truth" and strips away the emperor's new clothes worn by the Scottish justice system revealing a terribly flawed emaciated creature which nevertheless maintains an arrogant diffidence, proclaiming the validity of judgements self evidently shot through with the malignancy of upside down thought, and an inverted ethical compass. Fascinating to hear. Challenging to believe! 5 stars!

An immodest life story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-29-19

Essentially this is a vehicle for the author to proselytize his biblically based message. He has made a number of unresolved attempts at being a preacher in his life so it would seem this book afforded him a platform to realize that long desired goal. Secondary to the many witnessings to the power of Jesus are the rather cringe inducing plaudits he finds time to lavish on himself. It will suffice to note his claim in an interview that owing to his stance in a tragic case of police brutality on the behalf of the black victim, he is; "a hero in the Black community to this day!" I felt that I had paid ( the price of the book) for not a lot more than the privilege of reading the ins and outs of this man's ego. I got the strong sense of the authors honesty with regard to the details and his sense of personal integrity, an admirable quality so sorely lacking in many modern people but though I admire his sense of personal honor and decency, this does not, for me make especially entertaining or satisfying reading.

A minor masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-18

David McCallion does a very pleasing job of both narrating and voicing a number of characters in Balzac's very modern seeming book. This is a story highly entertaining and with a poigniant and disturbing moral. It is a story written with subtle hilarity and blackest comedy. In brief, Pere Goriot (father Goriot) is the father who loves his two spoiled daughters to a point which nearly fails human understanding. Through his generosity to them he has fallen from millionaire to pauper. They by way of marriage and through his help have attained the titles of Countess and Baroness, but now that he is poor he is an embarrassment to them and they no longer acknowledge him. His family are his fellow boarders in a run down boarding house in the Latin Quarter in Paris where most of the action transpires. This book in it's humour reminded me of Confederacy of Dunces (another great book) it is at once absurdist and highly realistic. I enjoyed it thouroughly and may indeed listen to it again after a while. It was a pure pleasure.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

A human heart revealed

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-18

I was put off at first by a plethora of statistics which I was afraid were going to comprise the entire book. I would suggest jumping ahead and skipping them to those not pleased by such things. Once what I would call the body of the book is reached it opens up into a picture reveals in patchwork of the various parts of the lives of people. I started by feeling they were alien to mine and indeed somewhat frightening due to the preconceived alien ness I felt. But what was slowly revealed were breathing people living lives. Laughing dying being born loving but above all living human lives. By the end of the book I felt the patchwork had resolved into a finely woven picture of life in the mid to late 17nth century. I met some old friends along the way specifically Samuel Pepys who’s diaries had engrossed me some years ago and another often quoted diarist who’s aquaintance I mean soon to make. This book allowed me to see yellow humans on a timeline not really very different from my own. In its hopes aspirations and follies. Their stories I think will travel with me for some time to come.