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  • Finite and Infinite Games

  • By: James Carse
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
  • Length: 4 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 119
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 119

“There are at least two kinds of games,” states James P. Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. “One could be called finite, the other infinite.” Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may change - as long as the game is never allowed to come to an end.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, but not well explained

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-07-18

Good Theory, Longer than Necessary

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-19

Philosophically the book was very good, I was entertained by the notions and see some heuristics I can apply to make sense of our crazy world. That being said it could have ended 50% of the way in and had the same value. 5 Stars if it was more concise. The extra 50% was just redundancy that the author had done good philosophy

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

The Dream of Reason
    A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Anthony Gottlieb
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Wanda McCaddon
    
    


    
    Length: 18 hrs and 4 mins
    828 ratings
    Overall 3.8
  • The Dream of Reason

  • A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance
  • By: Anthony Gottlieb
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 18 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 828
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 301
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 300

In this landmark new study of Western thought, Anthony Gottlieb looks afresh at the writings of the great thinkers, questions much of conventional wisdom, and explains his findings with unbridled brilliance and clarity. After finishing The Dream of Reason, listeners will be graced with a fresh appreciation of the philosophical quest, its entertaining and bizarre byways, and its influence on every aspect of life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An in depth read.

  • By Leigh A on 11-05-03

Introduction to the History of Philosophy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-18

A cogent list of the history of philosophy, told in an entertaining and neutral manner. Fair overview of many prominent figures in the history of the study, not tainted by philosphizing.

  • Skin in the Game

  • Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,920
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,549
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,529

In his most provocative and practical book yet, one of the foremost thinkers of our time redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept one's own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliance smothered by Condescension and Petty Squabbling

  • By Jeremy on 03-11-18

The iOS for Consuming Media in the ‘10s and Beyond

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-18

We have more exposure to media than ever before and the barrier to entry on published information has never been lower.

This book is the most effective operating system I have found on the navigation of the newest iteration of public life. Who should we listen to? Whose opinion should we take into consideration? What risks are worth taking? What ethically can I do to bring Good to the world (or better, avoid harm of others)?

We all need more symmetry in our lives. Relationships, investing, risk taking, regulation, sharing of advice and opinions publicly. SITG guides what we can in good conscience add to the world. Or at least follow The Silver Rule.

  • The Death of Expertise

  • The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why It Matters
  • By: Tom Nichols
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 8 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 583
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 534
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 527

People are now exposed to more information than ever before, provided both by technology and by increasing access to every level of education. These societal gains, however, have also helped fuel a surge in narcissistic and misguided intellectual egalitarianism that has crippled informed debates on any number of issues. Today, everyone knows everything and all voices demand to be taken with equal seriousness, and any claim to the contrary is dismissed as undemocratic elitism.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By iKlick on 09-10-17

The Opposite of What I Expected

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-18

I expected a book on why the effectiveness of “expertise” is dwindling. Instead I was bombarded by pseudo-intellectual groupthink on why the public is stupid, academics are experts and we should submit to their expertise blindly.

While the majority of academia strays further and further from rigorous critiquing and closer to groupthinking echo chambers, the author in essence asks ‘why doesn’t the average person follow the guidance of the ivory tower?’ If an expert is not accountable to the public/reality, and is only accountable to his peers, books like this are published.

Education (especially among the humanities, history, social sciences) is decentralizing and well-meaning but misguided “Experts” wonder why the public doesn’t think they have all the answers.

Production was fine, the author had a fine speaking voice. Otherwise avoid unless you’re looking to fluff your confirmation bias on the value of anointed experts.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful