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Renee Sorgenfrie

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  • 5
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  • Balanced and Barefoot

  • How Unrestricted Outdoor Play Makes for Strong, Confident, and Capable Children
  • By: Angela J. Hanscom
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Mitchell
  • Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47

Today's kids have adopted sedentary lifestyles filled with television, video games, and computer screens. But more and more, studies show that children need "rough and tumble" outdoor play in order to develop their sensory, motor, and executive functions. Disturbingly, a lack of movement has been shown to lead to a number of health and cognitive difficulties, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), emotion regulation and sensory processing issues, and aggressiveness at school recess break.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good information, challenging to listen to as it refers to itself often.

  • By Patrick R. Quinn on 08-12-16

One sided

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-19

This book is an encouragement for parents to have children play in natural landscapes, yes this is important. Children benefit from these activities by learning problem solving, physical well-being, communication strategies and self confidence. Although as a reader I am left to question how these practices can be instilled in families where outdoor natural play is not available. Consideration needs to be voiced for families who live in an area where safety is a concern, or natural play habitats are not present. The author made clear that artificial play environments will not meet the needs of Unrestricted Outdoor Play therefor what are the outlets for families who are not middle and upper middle-class. This book is great for families of resources, but does not provide alternatives for families without means, transportation, safety in their neighborhood and so forth.

  • A Long Way Gone

  • Memoirs of a Boy Soldier
  • By: Ishmael Beah
  • Narrated by: Ishmael Beah
  • Length: 7 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,192
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,071
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,071

This is how wars are fought now by children, hopped up on drugs, and wielding AK-47s. In the more than 50 violent conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers. Ishmael Beah used to be one of them. How does one become a killer? How does one stop? Child soldiers have been profiled by journalists, and novelists have struggled to imagine their lives. But it is rare to find a first-person account from someone who endured this hell and survived. In A Long Way Gone, Beah, now 26 years old, tells a riveting story in his own words: how, at the age of 12, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Author's voice

  • By B. Bunt on 11-01-13

Already recommended to family and friends!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-19

The moment I completed this book I raved to my family, encouraging them to read it. Impeccable writing that creates a clear visual. Some of the sections will continue to haunt my thoughts as they were so vivid and heartbreaking. The learning that has been created through this personal journey brings perspective and understanding to a group of people who had survived such disasters. It is clear how children became encased in the war not of their creation, but the question of "why" still remains.

  • Small Animals

  • Parenthood in the Age of Fear
  • By: Kim Brooks
  • Narrated by: Kim Brooks
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 139
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 139

Small Animals is a riveting examination of the ways our culture of competitive, anxious, and judgmental parenting has profoundly altered the experiences of parents and children. In her signature style - by turns funny, penetrating, and always illuminating - which has dazzled millions of fans and been called "striking" by the New York Times Book Review and "beautiful" by the National Book Critics Circle, Brooks offers a provocative, compelling portrait of parenthood in America and calls us to examine what we most value in our relationships with our children and one another.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating & Frustrating in equal measure

  • By Mark A. Mahler on 01-28-19

alternative look

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-19

This book presents an alternative look at practices in parenting. Parents (and others) have the best intentions for children. If we come to that understanding before judgement, conversational walls can be avoided and understanding/support will be created. Although (on the negative) this book can often come off as whiney. Perceptive is important for all sides of the conversation. This book vouched loudly for 1 chosen perspective once again. Although it was the alternative viewpoint, It is all the more important to give value to each side while coming to an understanding of a personal parenting situation.