LISTENER

L or D Day

  • 8
  • reviews
  • 22
  • helpful votes
  • 276
  • ratings
So Willing audiobook cover art
  • So Willing

  • By: Lawrence Block, Donald E. Westlake
  • Narrated by: Gary Telles
  • Length: 5 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 5

A certified sex-hunter at 17, Vince is making the leap to that most elusive game: the maiden. With his skills, seducing a virgin would be short work but for a simple problem: He can’t find any. First there’s Betty, whom he beds before learning she has a prude’s reputation only because she restricts her affairs to men from other towns. Then there’s Rhonda, frigid until a few sips of wine send her into an all-too-familiar sexual frenzy; and Adele, a sylphlike beauty who’s far from virginal but doesn’t sleep with boys....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Sleazy

  • By L or D Day on 12-20-18

Sleazy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-20-18

This appears to be one of Donald Westlakes early novels when he was writing soft core porn. The kid spends half the story hunting for a Virgin. The characters are decidedly immature and it sounds as if it was written for 12 year old boys. Though I wouldn’t recommend it for them
The reader is rather week, his timing and voices are somewhat mechanical. Overall an early book by a great author that should have stayed in the trunk.

  • Continue Online Part Four: Crash

  • By: Stephan Morse
  • Narrated by: Pavi Proczko
  • Length: 14 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 395
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 377
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 376

Actions have consequences. Grant’s prior adventures tie together and he finds himself back in Continue Online, as Hermes - in jail. He's forced to experience life as a digital convict and earn redemption points to gain his freedom. Each in-game death pushes his goal of helping his friends out of reach. The AIs Grant’s grown to love, trust - and sometimes fear - are facing extinction, and he holds the key to their survival.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ehhh...

  • By Anon on 03-21-18

Story recommend with reservations

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-18

This is a rare virtual reality tale with characters possessing a storyline with depth, consistent flow, and characters one grows to care about.
The story has two plot lines; the first is the impact advanced forms of virtual reality will have on a society embracing it, and how that society will react to the inevitable development of true AI. In this the author shows some true insight, happily avoiding the cliche of the evil corporations that seem to predominate in modern sci-fi. There are good characters and bad and each behaves in a way reflecting the characters ideology and values, logically advancing the story. The author should have stuck with this part of the storyline and found another way to motivate the main character., because had he done so, it could have been rated with Asimov’s Foundation series.
The second plot line, unfortunately is a childish love story so cliched, obsessive and poorly conceived it belongs in a teen romance. Its the plot a twelve year old girl would craft. (Mild spoiler)The main character looses his fiancé, whom he loves and misses, then discovers an echo of her in the VR program so he tries to go to connect with it. After discovery of this echo of his lost love, all he can do or think about is her. This obsession becomes quite tedious as the tale progresses, and while the love story is the main characters supposed motivation, the author needed quite a bit less of it. The protagonist speaks her name at least once per minute at times, as if we could forget it, and frames all of his grand decisions around how the result will affect her. At one point, with the fate of the whole virtual universe at stake, he admonishes his niece to make sure his fiancé isn’t hurt, ignoring that once the universe is gone, they’re all gone. It’s not cute, or heart warming, this guy is pathetic and his obsession is creepy. He’s more stalker than hero. Worse he likes to blame himself for things that go wrong, whether he was present at the time of the incident or not. This layering of guilt crops up a lot in pre teen books but is out of place here. We’re supposed,to see the main character as a reluctant hero, but dwelling on the past and wallowing in guilt is a behavior hero’s don’t engage in. If the author wants to understand heroic behavior and the love of a woman (which are fine and epic storylines), he should read the Odyssey first, where Odysseus spends ten years getting back to home & hearth. Obsessive behavior doesn’t fit a hero.

This second plot line caused me to actively dislike the hero and I found the story hard to finish, sometimes wishing he would die (his fiancé seemed stronger and more interesting) so the story would be less obsessive.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Santa & Pete

  • A Novel of Christmas Present and Past
  • By: Christopher Moore, Pamela Johnson
  • Narrated by: Delroy Lindo
  • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 106
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 87
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 88

Who would ever guess that the beloved legend of Santa Claus involves a seldom-told tale of faith and friendship between two men -- one white and one black? Long ago, Santa Claus had an African partner named Pete and together they brought the spirit of Christmas to America's first settlers. These two forever changed the way families celebrate the holiday. But through the years, Pete's contribution was forgotten.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not what I was expecting but still good

  • By Kim on 12-09-10

Not The Crhistopher Moore

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-17

I purchased this expecting it was written by the Christopher Moore who had written the "Stupidest Angel", "Lamb" and a host of other comic novels. I was a little leary of it but the name of the book posessed some similarity in the type of story name used by Christopher Moore the comic writer, and the authors link on audible took me that comic writers page so I bought it. Trouble is, the author isn't him. This Christopher Moore is a New York City official, who wrote an ethnic christmas story. Its mediocre at best, the story of Santa and his african assistant in the new world. It's certainly not comic. I don't care for this type of story so I'll leave further review to someone else.

  • Mr. Lincoln's Army

  • By: Bruce Catton
  • Narrated by: Kevin T. Collins
  • Length: 17 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 85
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85

A magnificent history of the opening years of the Civil War by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Bruce Catton. The first book in Bruce Catton's Pulitzer Prize-winning Army of the Potomac Trilogy, Mr. Lincoln's Army is a riveting history of the early years of the Civil War, when a fledgling Union Army took its stumbling first steps under the command of the controversial general George McClellan.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Very poor reader with great material

  • By L or D Day on 07-28-16

Very poor reader with great material

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-16

The Army of the Potomac is one of the finest Civil War series ever written. Bruce Catton, the former editor of American Heritage, was a natural story teller and this series is one of his two master works; the last book in the series was awarded a Pulitzer. The Army of the Potomac focuses on the development & growth of the officers and men of the federal army, unusual in civil war histories which tend to focus on the Confederacy which, more often than not treat the federals as a backdrop for the confederacy. This series explains why the larger, better equipped federal army struggled so fiercely against the confederacy and often fell so short, avoiding the trap of lionizing the outsized personalities of R.E.Lee and T.J.Jackson which overshadow their early federal counterparts. He also shows that it wasn't so much the brilliance of Gen's Lee & Jackson (not a Napolean in sight) but rather a broken federal system that turned the rebellion in Virginia, into a four year bloody slog. The Army of the Potomac pays tribute to the million or so men who actually fought the war to hold the republic together.

Unfortunately, this wonderful series is butchered by a dismal reader. Mr Collins has no sense of dramatic timing while telling the tale of this most dramatic of wars, his elocution is forced, and words are pronounced as if delivering a lesson to a grade school full of bored students. There isn't a touch of natural timing in his delivery and I wound up speeding up the recording in order to make the listening tolerable. I might have returned it had I not waited nearly 10 years for an audio version of this series.

Final summary, this series is a civil war cannon ranking among the greats. The reader, not so much.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The Plagiarist

  • A Novella
  • By: Hugh Howey
  • Narrated by: Alexander J. Masters
  • Length: 1 hr and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 561
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 496
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 494

Adam Griffey is living two lives. By day, he teaches literature. At night, he steals it. Adam is a plagiarist, an expert reader with an eye for great works. He prowls simulated worlds perusing virtual texts, looking for the next big thing. And when he finds it, he memorizes it page by page, line by line, word for word. And then he brings it back to his world, the real world, and he sells it. But what happens when these virtual worlds begin to seem more real than his own? What happens when the people within them mean more to him than flesh and blood?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • The reader lacked tone.

  • By L or D Day on 03-17-15

The reader lacked tone.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-15

An interesting sci-fi tale that takes advantage of the idea that universes are layered and at the mercy of the higher levels. Not an uncommon but not uninteresting conceit. At the risk of ruining the story, essentially our hero is a data miner who falls in love with one of these "lesser beings". Decent story.

The reader is the weak point. He is monotonal and lends no drama to what should otherwise be quite a suspenseful story. He seems to plod along as if he is trying to put the listener to sleep, not give a dramatic performance. As a result at several points I considered not finishing the story. Before buying this story I'd recommend listening to the reader and asking if you would enjoy listening to this tone for 1&½ hours.

DDay

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

Fahrenheit 451 audiobook cover art
  • Fahrenheit 451

  • By: Ray Bradbury
  • Narrated by: Ray Bradbury
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 449
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 283
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 289

Guy Montag was a fireman whose job it was to start fires....The system was simple. Everyone understood it. Books were for burning...along with the houses in which they were hidden. Montag enjoyed his job. He had been a fireman for 10 years, and he had never questioned the pleasure of the midnight runs, nor the joy of watching pages consumed by flames...never questioned anything until he met a 17-year-old girl who told him of a past when people were not afraid.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Listen before you buy...

  • By Nancy on 01-31-12

Butchered by the Reader

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-11

This is a case of one of the finest stories ever written being ruined by a poor actor. While I realize that Mr. Bradbury is an Icon and easily one of the ten best writers of the 20th century he should never be allowed to perform his own works. It may be charming to hear the original writer but much of the drama inherent in the work is lost. The performance is monotonic and at times spoken as if he forgot what punctuation was used for. A shame too, because the story itself is without a doubt one of the best, and should be in every ones canon. Hold out for a better reader.

Hot Springs audiobook cover art
  • Hot Springs

  • By: Stephen Hunter
  • Narrated by: Jay O. Sanders
  • Length: 5 hrs and 24 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

In the summer of 1946, the most wide-open town in America is Hot Springs, Arkansas, a city of legendary corruption. While the pilgrims take the cure in the mineral-rich water, the brothels and casinos are the true source of the town's prosperity. But all this is challenged when a newly elected county prosecutor hires ex-Marine sergeant Earl Swagger to wage a war.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping

  • By L or D Day on 10-03-10

Gripping

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-10

I won't bother summarizing the plot, the publisher does an adequate job. What you need to know is this audio book worth listening to and the answer is a resounding: Yes. I gave this four stars because it is an abridged version and ten hours of fine story were clipped, otherwise it's exceptional. One warning, it is a guy story, written for men, if you want emoting look elsewhere. Hunters' technical descriptions of both guns and Marines are spot on(Semper Fi). It is, without a doubt one of of his most enthralling novel's. Additionally, the voice actor captures accents and tones so thoroughly that one can visualize each different character as if in a movie or maybe more accurately a radio play, creating a completely immersive world where you are waiting for each fast breaking development. If you find anything in Hot Springs predictable it is only because action novels have a certain foregone conclusions (good over bad) and an author writes for his audience. American authors in this genre can not let the bad guys win, that reeks too much of real life. Besides who would want to read (or in this case hear) a novel where the hero takes a .22 to the back of the head while walking down Main St(this is how Earl would have really met his fate)? No, in a guy novel, the good guy has to go against a legion of bad guys and leave a blood spattered heap of corpses behind as he rides off into the sunset. The hero is always just a little bit better and Earl is the best of his kind.
My one great complaint is that it is this abridged version is the only one available; a travesty. The cuts are made so that you will not notice them, the story flows well, you will be gripping the edge of your seat. Now, would you release the unabridged version, please!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Coyote Blue

  • By: Christopher Moore
  • Narrated by: James Jenner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 679
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 684

With New York Times best-sellers like Bloodsucking Fiends to his credit, Christopher Moore has developed a devoted cult following. Coyote Blue introduces Samuel Hunter, a young man who's running from his past while being tormented by an ancient Crow God with a talent for mischief.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • You Can't Go Wrong with Moore

  • By Mari on 05-02-09

An Early Effort by a Soon to be Great Author

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-10

This novel lets you see how Mr Moore's style developed in his early novels. The characteristics which have become his signatures traits can be seen as he develops, they are just not as polished as they would later be. That said, this is still a very good comic novel if one can stop comparing it with Fluke, Bloodsucking Fiends, You Suck, Lamb, Etc... With a body of work like that, an otherwise acceptable early effort doesn't fare as well as it should.
The reason I gave this version three stars is the narrator. He lacked the voice acting skills required to do this tale justice. Susan Bennett from the Blood Sucking Fiends series was able to bring an entire cast of characters to life as was Fisher Stevens in Lamb and A Dirty Job. I was often doubled over with laughter as I heard those tales acted out, often with the same skill level one might encounter in an old radio drama. To fully appreciate a Christopher Moore audio book voice acting skills are paramount and unfortunately Mr. Jenner doesn't have the range. He is quite competent but much of the humor is lost by his limited vocal abilities.
This is the audio book to buy when you must absolutely have one more Christopher Moore Novel and have emptied the library or all his other efforts (been there). The concept is good and as usual he did a bit of research before writing on the subject. Keep in mind however, he was a relatively young author.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful