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Lucy

St. Petersburg, Russia
  • 49
  • reviews
  • 116
  • helpful votes
  • 237
  • ratings
  • A God in Ruins

  • A Novel
  • By: Kate Atkinson
  • Narrated by: Alex Jennings
  • Length: 16 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,753
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,600
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,597

A God in Ruins tells the dramatic story of the 20th century through Ursula's beloved younger brother, Teddy - would-be poet, heroic pilot, husband, father, and grandfather - as he navigates the perils and progress of a rapidly changing world. After all that Teddy endures in battle, his greatest challenge is living in a future he never expected to have.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • FRUSTRATING BUT GOOD

  • By Janna Wong Healy on 10-27-15

Fantastic!! Worth the time!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-15

Hot damn, what an ending !! I love this even more than I loved "Life After Life". I'm in for anything else she writes. . . ever.

  • The Witch of Lime Street

  • Séance, Seduction, and Houdini in the Spirit World
  • By: David Jaher
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 14 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 115
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 105

The 1920s are famous as the golden age of jazz and glamour, but it was also an era of fevered yearning for communion with the spirit world, after the loss of tens of millions in the First World War and the Spanish-flu epidemic. A desperate search for reunion with dead loved ones precipitated a tidal wave of self-proclaimed psychics - and, as reputable media sought stories on occult phenomena, mediums became celebrities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great History of a Fascinating Cultural Phenomenon

  • By R. Schechter on 03-01-16

This Drags

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-15

I heard great things about this before listening. I expected salaciousness, scandals and sacrilege. What I got was an overly long reading of observational notes. How it's possible to make a topic like this dull is beyond me but this accomplished it.

As always though Simon Vance is sublime.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Asking for It

  • The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture - and What We Can Do About It
  • By: Kate Harding
  • Narrated by: Erin Bennett
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 215
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190

Sexual violence has been so prominent in recent years that the feminist term "rape culture" has finally entered the mainstream. But what, exactly, is it? And how do we change it? In Asking for It, Kate Harding answers those questions in the same blunt, no-nonsense voice that has made her a powerhouse feminist blogger. Combining in-depth research with practical knowledge, Asking for It makes the case that 21st-century America supports rapists more effectively than victims.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clear, concise, and thought provoking.

  • By Jo Green on 11-17-16

A must listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-15

This was a wonderful book. It's smart, incisive, and funny. A real must read for a better understanding of the world we live in. It would also be great paired with Missoula.

3 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Welcome to Braggsville

  • A Novel
  • By: T. Geronimo Johnson
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 125
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 117
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 118

Born and raised in the heart of old Dixie, D'aron Davenport finds himself in unfamiliar territory his freshman year at UC Berkeley. Two thousand miles and a world away from his childhood, he is a small-town fish floundering in the depths of a large, hyperliberal pond. Caught between the prosaic values of his rural hometown and the intellectualized, multicultural cosmopolitanism of Berzerkeley, the 19-year-old white kid is uncertain about his place until one disastrous party brings him three idiosyncratic best friends.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting but flawed

  • By Lucy on 07-23-15

Interesting but flawed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-23-15

This was a really interesting examination of race-relations, culture, privilege, sexuality, and education. The premise was really solid and the some of the themes were examined well. At times though it felt as though this book was trying to hard to make it's point. It's tangets and attempts at meta analysis worked against it's overall impact. So good but not great.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Go Set a Watchman

  • A Novel
  • By: Harper Lee
  • Narrated by: Reese Witherspoon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13,923
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,766
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12,731

An historic literary event: the publication of a newly discovered novel, the earliest known work from Harper Lee, the beloved, best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Originally written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman was the novel Harper Lee first submitted to her publishers before To Kill a Mockingbird. Assumed to have been lost, the manuscript was discovered in late 2014.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • To Kill A Mockingbird vs Go Set A Watchman

  • By Sara on 07-15-15

Perfect Narrator, Good Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-15-15

I loved this. I unapologetically loved it. I've given it one read through and reserve the right to adjust opinions and thoughts after several re-reads, but as it stands now I loved it.

The media has been all a flutter about the fact that in this version Atticus is a racist. True he is -- that does not make this a bad book. There are plenty of great books with problematic characters. Not to mention the fact that this was the first draft and Harper Lee clearly decided to go in a different direction in the final TKAM. What makes this book great is not Atticus, not even a little bit. What makes this one great is Scout.

GSAW's Scout is a bad ass, and quite possibly my literary doppelganger, or at the very least my new literary friend crush. Grown-up Scout is ferociously independent, idealistic and a wonderful example of feminism (especially given when this was written). She is the color- blind hero to GSAW that Atticus was to TKAM. She is ferocious about it too. The scene when she calls Atticus to the carpet is tense. In some ways the underlying themes about racism that Lee achieved so beautifully in TKAM are still here, in a more raw state but still here. The difference is that they are expressed by Scout rather than to her through Atticus.

The beauty of this one is in the way it handles growing up, and in the way it addresses very real life. It beautifully, masterfully handles the heartache of coming into one's own and the pain of realizing that your parents and childhood may be deeply flawed; that you may have missed things as a child that you don't want to see as an adult. The way we deal literally and figuratively with the concept of not being able to go home again.

I would love to design and teach and/or sit in on a university course examining these two books side by side. I think there are many interesting criticisms to be leveled at both. I'd love to have a discussion about what it says about our expectations of main characters that for the story to get published the powerful advocate for racial-blindness and equality had to be switched from a woman to a man? Also, what does it say that we worship the spotless character of Atticus Finch in TKAM when in reality this version is probably more nuanced and accurate?

The least interesting thing about this book is that Atticus is *surprise* flawed. Even if we ignored that this is in fact the first draft of what would become TKAM and pretend that it is actually the sequel, Atticus is still a great man in TKAM. If this were really the sequel do his actions in TKAM, both in terms of the trial and in raising this version of Scout, become less meaningful of valid because he is more racist in this book? Or,is it perhaps interesting to consider that in the real world it may be possible, not preferable, but possible to be both? Is it not possible that Atticus is a great father, a judicious lawyer, and also a racist? This is a great book in its own right and will make for some fascinating discussions in years to come.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids

  • By: Kenzaburo Oe, Paul St. John Mackintosh (translator), Maki Sugiyama (translator)
  • Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
  • Length: 5 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 47

Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids recounts the exploits of 15 teenage reformatory boys evacuated to a remote mountain village in wartime. The boys are treated as delinquent outcasts - feared and detested by the local peasants. When plague breaks out, their hosts abandon them and flee, blockading them inside the empty village.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • beautifully read, wonderful translation.

  • By Marcos on 02-09-18

Good, but. . .

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-15

Overall, this is a solid and well written book. Bleak, but solid.

The first chapter is problematic, and I'm not sure if it's a translation issue or an author issue, but words like "fagged out" feel jarring and wholly out of place. It's also hard to follow until the trip to the village. Give it a chapter or two.

Which raises my second issue with the book. There was a weird, creepy sexual undertone that was inconsistent but kept sneaking in every so often. I say weird and creepy because it didn't seem to fit in the larger context of the book. It couldn't decide what kind of tone it wanted to be. It alternated between homoerotic and homophobic with an healthy underlying dose of implied pedophilia thrown in for good measure.

Don't get me wrong all of those have an arguably valid place in literature, but they didn't fit here --at all. They did absolutely nothing to add to an otherwise solid story nor were they relevant to character development. Rather they felt like the author was either trying to personally work through something, or added in a bit of sexually socking ambiguity because -- you know-- literary fiction is more literary that way.

So 4 but with a huge star-sucking caveat.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Cain

  • By: Jose Saramago
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pariseau
  • Length: 5 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 96
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 86

In this, his last novel, Saramago daringly reimagines the characters and narratives of the Bible through the story of Cain. Condemned to wander forever after he kills Abel, he is whisked around in time and space. He experiences the almost-sacrifice of Isaac by Abraham, the Tower of Babel, the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, Joshua at the battle of Jericho, Jobe's ordeal, and finally Noah's ark and the Flood.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One Heck of Funny Book!!!!!

  • By Melinda on 10-14-15

Faulty recording, decent story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-15

This was entertaining, but fell a bit short on the heels of "Death with Interruptions" (which was masterful). Also there are glitches in the recording where the audio is spliced strangely and you miss a chunk. I am planning to return it as a faulty recording although story wise I'd say give it a go.

  • The Wrath and the Dawn

  • By: Renee Ahdieh
  • Narrated by: Ariana Delawari
  • Length: 10 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 648
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 591
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 592

Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the 18-year-old caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise. So it is a suspicious surprise when 16-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid. But she does so with a clever plan to stay alive and exact revenge on the caliph for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls. Shazi's wit and will, indeed, get her through to the dawn that no others have seen, but with a catch.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Story, Passable Narrator

  • By Shelby Ence on 10-24-15

Way too much left undone - returning it.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-15

*minor spoilers* I picked this up because of all the buzz recently, but was really rather disappointed. There were parts that were quite promising, and it was an interesting premise, but I rather felt like it was unfinished (and I don't just mean the giant 'where the hell is the rest' cliff hanger). There was quite a bit left hanging or unexplained: the carpet and the teacher, the significance of the falcon, the insignias, the sort of attempt at magical realism but not, the curse. And don't even get me started on the quality of the dialog. I'd love to believe that the unfinished-ness was an intentional play to recreate the nightly story telling and the dawn, but I don't think there was a strong enough nod to the original (She told what 2 stories in this?) to make that work. However if it was an intentional parallel than kudos to the author for the meta-nod.

This book seems to be trying to capitalize on the recent trend in things like movies of splitting sequels/final installments into as many money grabbing parts as possible. The problem here is that this is a first book and doesn't have the already weighted fan base or the internal back story to support it.

Overall love the idea but am ultimately not impressed with the execution. I'll be returning this one.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir Who Got Trapped in an Ikea Wardrobe

  • By: Romain Puertolas, Sam Taylor (translator)
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 5 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 25

When the fakir - a professional con artist - arrives in Paris, he has just one goal: to get to Ikea. Armed with only a counterfeit hundred-euro note in the pocket of his silk trousers, he is confident that he has all he needs to thrive. But his plan goes horribly awry when he hides inside a wardrobe at the iconic Swedish retailer - the first in a series of accidents that will send him on a whirlwind tour across Europe.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not as smart as the title

  • By Lucy on 02-27-15

Not as smart as the title

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-15

I'm not going to lie, I bought this book because of the title -- what a fantastic title, right? Also, becuase in trying to read more books in translation this year.

I was disappointed. It's a creative story idea and has brief pockets of interesting, but it's ultimately forgettable. It's trying too hard to be clever and a bit surreal to do either properly.

More positively the narrator was great and the name jokes played well in audio.

Overall don't waste your time. The title is the best bit.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Heartbreaker

  • By: Julie Garwood
  • Narrated by: Tanya Eby
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,059
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 930
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 927

In the still shadows of the confessional, a madman tauntingly reveals his plan for a murder he is going to commit, pulling Father Thomas Madden into a twisted game by disclosing his next intended victim: Tom's sister, Laurant. In a frantic race to protect her, Tom calls upon his best friend, elite FBI agent Nick Buchanan, to track the predator who is closing in on Laurant. Now, as an electrifying attraction grows between Laurant and Nick, so does the danger - and one false move will cost both of them everything that matters.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun and Funny

  • By Elaine on 07-15-14

Great story awful narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-15

I've read this book before but never listened to it. I still love the story but the narrator was terrible. Her accents are laughably bad. As the main character has a French accent by the end I was ready to pull my hair out listening to the narrator butcher it. Unfortunate because the story is otherwise worth a listen.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful