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Chris Reich

Northern, CA
  • 187
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  • 523
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  • Lincoln in the Bardo

  • A Novel
  • By: George Saunders
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman, David Sedaris, George Saunders, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,661
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,184
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,145

The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented. February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A Mixed Bag

  • By Thomas More on 02-24-17

Experimental and Decently So

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-19

To say it's a bit disjointed would be a lousy play on words. However, while I like the idea, the Lincoln theme doesn't supply enough collagen to hold the body together. Possibly, it would be better without the Lincoln stuff as it is more of a Ken Burns type look at America, society, life, and death. These subjects are handled deftly. The Lincoln thing, not so much.

I'm glad I finally got around to trying this audiobook and won't say it's not a worthy listen. But, I wasn't wowed by it. I wish authors would consider doing subsequent editions as they do with non-fiction books. Saunders could improve this book by building on what he discovered. The idea is good and it works.

I recommend this book if you like experimental writing, have the credit to burn, and can roll with the experience with low expectations. Let go of a need for a coherent storyline. Just relax and enjoy it.

Cheers

  • A Crack in Creation

  • Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution
  • By: Jennifer A. Doudna, Samuel H. Sternberg
  • Narrated by: Erin Bennett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 690
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 617
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 613

Not since the atomic bomb has a technology so alarmed its inventors that they warned the world about its use. Not, that is, until the spring of 2015, when biologist Jennifer Doudna called for a worldwide moratorium on the use of the new gene-editing tool CRISPR - a revolutionary new technology that she helped create - to make heritable changes in human embryos.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An easily digestible intro to the future...

  • By DC Mike on 09-01-17

Stayed Up All Night

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-20-19

The only thing I did not like about this book is that it kept me up all night.

Hands down, the best science book I have purchased and there are many. This book is fascinating and perfectly paced. If you like science you will love this superb book.

  • A Universe from Nothing

  • Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing
  • By: Lawrence M. Krauss
  • Narrated by: Lawrence M. Krauss, Simon Vance
  • Length: 5 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,854
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,545
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,518

Where did the universe come from? What was there before it? What will the future bring? And finally, why is there something rather than nothing? Krauss’ answers to these and other timeless questions, in a wildly popular lecture on YouTube, has attracted almost a million viewers. One of the few prominent scientists to have actively crossed the chasm between science and popular culture, Krauss reveals that modern science is indeed addressing the question of why there is something rather than nothing—with surprising and fascinating results.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Read Review Before Buying

  • By Claire on 04-26-18

Doesn't Answer the Unanswerable Question

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-01-19

Why is there something? We'll likely never know. Science can look back and see the beginning. Science can figure out much of how our universe developed after the first about 300,000 years. That is remarkable. Surely it beats the mythologies of the world's religions that created their own creation stories.

What lies beyond the curtain of the hot soup following the big bang? Who knows? Why is there something? Because there cannot be 'nothing'? That's not enough for me. Because the universe's vastness and 'empty' space is full of energy and virtual particles? That's cheating since those things are part of the fabric of space-time.

What is amazing is that we 'know' the age of the universe within two decimal places. Wow. That is impressive. And the universe isn't that old---13.77(2) billion years. If this doesn't fascinate you, move on.

Could there be a god who made it all? I see nothing that says that is impossible. But I agree with the author in that we must not stop with a belief when we have the brains to explore and solve. The church used to teach that earth was the center of creation.

Read the book.

  • Ender's Game

  • Special 20th Anniversary Edition
  • By: Orson Scott Card
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki, Harlan Ellison, Gabrielle de Cuir
  • Length: 11 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,774
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,250
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,486

Why we think it’s a great listen: It’s easy to say that when it comes to sci-fi you either love it or you hate it. But with Ender’s Game, it seems to be you either love it or you love it.... The war with the Buggers has been raging for a hundred years, and the quest for the perfect general has been underway for almost as long. Enter Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, the result of decades of genetic experimentation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Enderverse

  • By Joe on 06-13-05

Better Fit for Young Adult Category

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-18

I made it through and enjoyed much of this book as very light entertainment.

The book could have been very profound. After all, we're talking about raising kids as the perfect leaders in warfare. There's a lot of potential on that point. Brave New World comes to mind. Lord of the Flies comes to mind. This book becomes more of a Disney theme than a Huxley shocker. The last quarter is a mess in my opinion.

On the positive, it's entertaining. Negative? Falls apart in the end. Seems better suited to a young adult category.

  • The Verdict

  • By: Nick Stone
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 21 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,929
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,420
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,400

Terry Flynt is a struggling legal clerk desperately trying to get promoted when he is given the biggest opportunity of his career: to help defend a millionaire accused of murdering a woman in his hotel suite. The only problem is that the accused man, Vernon James, is not only someone he knows but someone he loathes. This case could potentially make Terry's career, but how can he defend a former friend who betrayed him?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of THE best audiobooks ever!

  • By Sarah on 05-22-16

A Very Good Trial/Court Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-18

To be succinct: I liked the book very much. It held my interest but the ending seemed just a bit jumbled and rushed. It doesn't fully resolve in my opinion.

The case is interesting despite a number of unexplained pieces. Still I enjoyed the principal character and was entertained by the book. I recommend giving it read.

  • How Music Works

  • By: David Byrne
  • Narrated by: Andrew Garman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 862
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 769
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 764

Best known as a founding member and principal songwriter of the iconic band Talking Heads, David Byrne has received Grammy, Oscar, and Golden Globe awards and has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In the insightful How Music Works, Byrne offers his unique perspective on music - including how music is shaped by time, how recording technologies transform the listening experience, the evolution of the industry, and much more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Art Eats Itself

  • By Audio Gra Gra on 05-04-16

What a Fantastic Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-18

If you like music, any genre, you will probably like this book. it is very intelligently written and extremely entertaining. I love all the insights, factoids, and behind the scenes looks into music. This book has it all. There is even quite a bit of history mixed in. The style is almost conversational.

This book is not to be missed.

  • Other Minds

  • The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness
  • By: Peter Godfrey-Smith
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble
  • Length: 6 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 968
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 860
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 860

Although mammals and birds are widely regarded as the smartest creatures on earth, it has lately become clear that a very distant branch of the tree of life has also sprouted higher intelligence: the cephalopods, consisting of the squid, the cuttlefish, and above all the octopus. In captivity, octopuses have been known to identify individual human keepers, raid neighboring tanks for food, turn off lightbulbs by spouting jets of water, plug drains, and make daring escapes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Empathy for an Octopus?

  • By Chris Geschwantner on 05-31-17

Conflicted About This Book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-18

The book is enjoyable and does deliver some very interesting ideas. I have to remind myself that this is a book written by a philosopher and not a scientist. That's not to demean the book, merely to set it on its proper shelf. I love science and fact so I wish there was more science in the book.

On the other hand, the philosophical ideas are pretty rich. I have never considered the octopus as having a brain which evolved on a totally different track from the mammalian brain. Having a distributed brain is an interesting bit of physiology to ponder too.

While I didn't love this book, I did like it enough to recommend it to anyone interested in the subject.

  • Chernobyl

  • The History of a Nuclear Catastrophe
  • By: Serhii Plokhy
  • Narrated by: Ralph Lister
  • Length: 14 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 412
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 386

On the morning of April 26, 1986, Europe witnessed the worst nuclear disaster in history: the explosion of a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Soviet Ukraine. Dozens died of radiation poisoning, fallout contaminated half the continent, and thousands fell ill. In Chernobyl, Serhii Plokhy draws on new sources to tell the dramatic stories of the firefighters, scientists, and soldiers who heroically extinguished the nuclear inferno. He lays bare the flaws of the Soviet nuclear industry....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well Worth the Time

  • By Chris Reich on 08-09-18

Well Worth the Time

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-18

This book held my interest from the first minute. It is a very interesting look at a huge event. What I found particularly unique is that the book is told from a Soviet perspective without the propaganda. I felt genuinely sorry for the people who were on scene.

I expected to learn about the disaster but was pleasantly surprised at how much I learned about the event, people, landscape, and system around the plant.

I highly recommend this book if you like this kind of book.

16 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • The Coming Storm

  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Michael Lewis
  • Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,208
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,540
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,499

Tornadoes, cyclones, tsunamis… Weather can be deadly – especially when it strikes without warning. Millions of Americans could soon find themselves at the mercy of violent weather if the public data behind lifesaving storm alerts gets privatized for personal gain. In his first Audible Original feature, New York Times best-selling author and journalist Michael Lewis delivers hard-hitting research on not-so-random weather data – and how Washington plans to release it. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why you shouldn't ignore the weather forecast

  • By Elisabeth Carey on 09-10-18

Abridged? Leftovers?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-18

This seems like a collection of leftovers from other projects. We're talking about the weather and then we get a mini-biography of an astronaut. While it's all interesting, it's also disjointed. Feels like a sampler. Certainly worth the price.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Deep

  • Freediving, Renegade Science, and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves
  • By: James Nestor
  • Narrated by: James Nestor
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,019
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 943
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 939

Deep is a voyage from the ocean's surface to its darkest trenches, the most mysterious places on Earth. Fascinated by the sport of freediving - in which competitors descend to great depths on a single breath - James Nestor embeds with a gang of oceangoing extreme athletes and renegade researchers. He finds whales that communicate with other whales hundreds of miles away, sharks that swim in unerringly straight lines through pitch-black waters, and other strange phenomena.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More than I expected!

  • By P. Wilson on 11-13-17

Fascinating Topic Very Well Presented

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-18

I had no prior knowledge of free diving and this book was a wonderful surprise. This is an eye-opener and very engaging read. It made me want to know more. That says a lot.

This book is highly recommended.