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disudds

SLC, UT
  • 53
  • reviews
  • 88
  • helpful votes
  • 87
  • ratings
  • The Remains of the Day

  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 8 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,772
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,434
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,417

The Remains of the Day is a profoundly compelling portrait of the perfect English butler and of his fading, insular world in postwar England. At the end of his three decades of service at Darlington Hall, Stevens embarks on a country drive, during which he looks back over his career to reassure himself that he has served humanity by serving "a great gentleman". But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's "greatness" and graver doubts about his own faith in the man he served.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent audio book performance

  • By Julie Leto on 08-03-14

Play it a little faster than read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-18

When I started listening to The Remains of the Day, I felt it was moving rather slowly and I found the narrator a little tedious. I mean, how interesting can the life of a butler really be, even if his employer is entertaining powerful men in the 1930s. But then, I switched the reading to 1.25X and whether it was the pace of the reading, or the story itself, I suddenly found myself enjoying Mr. Stevens' account very much. In fact, what started out rather slow and dull, first became amusing, and then rather funny. I started seeing the quirkiness of the characters, especially Stevens himself, and found that revelation adding immensely to my enjoyment. More than once I found myself giggling as I drove to work while Stevens stumbled through life as the consummate butler. I'm not sure if Ishiguro meant for this to happen or not, but in the end, I found myself hoping that Stevens could find his own self under the layers of butler that were built over time.

  • Beach Music

  • A Novel
  • By: Pat Conroy
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Marosz
  • Length: 26 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,721
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,447
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,445

Pat Conroy is without doubt America's favorite storyteller, a writer who portrays the anguished truth of the human heart and the painful secrets of families in richly lyrical prose and unforgettable narratives. Now, in Beach Music, he tells of the dark memories that haunt generations, in a story that spans South Carolina and Rome and reaches back into the unutterable terrors of the Holocaust.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Memorable

  • By Ella on 03-14-10

Moving and beautifully written

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

I love Pat Conroy's writing. I love his ability to tell a story with words so lush you can feel them and taste them. I love his ability to create characters that are so full of humanity that they make you laugh and cry right along with them. I love his ability to tackle difficult themes like racism and dysfunction in people and families. I love that he isn't afraid to be both amazing and disgusting while his plot twists and turns through the pages of his novels. Beach Music is all of these things.

But I only gave it four stars because interlaced with the complex story of Jack, who is trying to heal from his wife's suicide while also loving his mother to the end of her life, were too many side stories that didn't really move the overall story forward. Some of the stories about Nazi Germany were interesting, and necessary to understand Shyla's character, and the detail was so complete as to bring those stories as alive as the rest of the book, but it became a distraction from the real story. The "theater" chapter towards the end was very tedious and did little more than to tell the story of the young-adult Jack and his childhood friends. It shed some light on Shyla's angst, but the tool of the theater fell flat.

All in all, it was another good summer ready, another beautifully written and lovingly told story, but it wasn't my favorite. Time to find the next Conroy gem.

  • My Twenty-Five Years in Provence

  • Reflections on Then and Now
  • By: Peter Mayle
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 4 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62

A celebration of 25 years of Provençal living - of lessons learned and changes observed - with his final book, Peter Mayle has crafted a lasting love letter to his adopted home, marked by his signature warmth, wit, and humor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Delightful as always

  • By V T Abel on 07-18-18

Like taking a trip myself

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

Reading Peter Mayle is like walking through Provence (at least I hope it is...I've actually never been). Parts of "My Twenty-Five Years" were like revisiting a familiar friend, stories from other books and memories. Other parts were refreshingly new. Mayle is so easy to read and his stories always bring a smile.

  • The Vintage Caper

  • By: Peter Mayle
  • Narrated by: Erik Davies
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 120
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 75

The story begins high above Los Angeles, at the extravagant home and equally impressive wine cellar of entertainment lawyer Danny Roth. Unfortunately, after inviting the Los Angeles Times to write an extensive profile extolling the liquid treasures of his collection, Roth finds himself the victim of a world-class wine heist.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A bad reader reads cliches

  • By benefit on 11-30-09

So fun!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

Another fun romp in southern France. It isn't life changing. It isn't deep. But it sure is fun to read and vicariously enjoy all the good food and wine while Sam is on his adventure

  • Emma

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Jane Austen, Anna Lea - adaptation
  • Narrated by: Emma Thompson, Joanne Froggatt, Isabella Inchbald, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,012
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,089
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,019

This Audible Original production is narrated by Emma Thompson (Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy and BAFTA winner, Love Actually, Harry Potter, Sense and Sensibility), with a full supporting cast including Joanne Froggatt, Morgana Robinson, Aisling Loftus, Joseph Millson, Alexa Davies and rising star Isabella Inchbald as our eponymous heroine.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More of a Radio Drama than an audiobook

  • By Cyberlucy on 09-11-18

Great production

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

I'm sure I enjoyed this much more in the Audible production than I would have if I'd just read the book (which I think I might have years ago). Sometimes funny, sometimes pathetic, and always a glimpse into another time, the story of the avowed bachelorette, Emma, who loves to meddle in the love lives of others is charming.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Grocery

  • The Buying and Selling of Food in America
  • By: Michael Ruhlman
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 121
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 122

In a culture obsessed with food - how it looks, what it tastes like, where it comes from, what is good for us - there are often more questions than answers. Michael Ruhlman proposes that the best practices for consuming wisely could be hiding in plain sight - in the aisles of your local supermarket. Using the human story of the family-run Midwestern chain Heinen's as an anchor to this journalistic narrative, he dives into the mysterious world of supermarkets and the ways in which we produce, consume, and distribute food.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Salivating

  • By Ethan on 12-29-18

It's ok

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

I had great hopes for this book, and I did learn a few things about the grocery industry, but many of those things were depressing. I don't live in a community with the kinds of fresh and purposely acquired fancy foods that Heineman's carries and now my grocery store pales by comparison. I enjoyed the history of the industry, but that could have happened in far fewer pages. And in the end, what I will remember most about the writing style was Ruhlman's lists of grocery items, in one chapter all the frozen foods, in another all the produce. I didn't really need that.

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,239
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,089
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,761

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

  • By TheBookie on 06-04-18

Pretty heavy

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

This turned out to be a much heavier read than I expected so an audiobook might not have been the best choice. Peterson's theories are largely based on British literature and European philosophies (Milton, Nietzsche, Goethe) with more than a sprinkling of Bible passages thrown in. I found many of his assertions interesting, but was often struck by what seemed to be a faintly misogynist viewpoint. The wives in his examples are always horrible creatures who whine and manipulate and his defense of white males was completely unnecessary. That said, every day I was reading the book brought something interesting to discuss at the dinner table so it served a purpose there. And, I appreciate a book that makes me think and 12 Rules definitely did that.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Death of Mrs. Westaway

  • By: Ruth Ware
  • Narrated by: Imogen Church
  • Length: 14 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,922
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,604
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,580

On a day that begins like any other, Hal receives a mysterious letter bequeathing her a substantial inheritance. She realizes very quickly that the letter was sent to the wrong person - but also that the cold-reading skills she's honed as a tarot card reader might help her claim the money. Soon, Hal finds herself at the funeral of the deceased...where it dawns on her that there is something very, very wrong about this strange situation and the inheritance at the center of it. Full of spellbinding menace and told in Ruth Ware's signature suspenseful style, an addictive thriller.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Death of Mrs. Westaway

  • By Debbie De on 06-03-18

So glad to be finished

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

I'm so glad to be finished! The story of Hal, the misbegotten granddaughter of Mrs. Westaway, will be one I will soon forget. So very little about this novel worked for me. A gothic tale in the 1990s? A dishonest, self-absorbed, over analytical heroine? A languid reader stuck inside of Hal's head unable to move the story along? I found it all pretty tedious and finally resorted to setting my audio-book at 1.5 speed to finish because the reader was so incredibly slow it seemed like nothing was happening.

I didn't find any of the characters likable or relate-able and the gothic attempts just didn't work for me. Hal's inability to be herself and her tedious thoughts--should I, shouldn't I, should I--created unappealing character. There is very little story here so the plot drags as Hal wrestles with herself and perseverates on every little thing. I was pretty knew I knew most of the mystery about half way through, but had to wait for Hal to figure it out before the final pieces fell into place. Nope, not for me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Before We Were Yours

  • A Novel
  • By: Lisa Wingate
  • Narrated by: Emily Rankin, Catherine Taber
  • Length: 14 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,892
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,682
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,529

Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family's Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge - until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children's Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents - but they quickly realize the dark truth.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I was rivetted, finished in three days.

  • By Lin Cloward on 06-26-17

Historical, horrifying, hopeful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-18

What an amazing story--emotional, poignant, horrifying, hopeful, historical, well written--Before We Were Yours has everything. The story of Rill Foss and her sisters weighed heavy on my heart the whole time I was reading and will stick with me for a long time. Even though the novel is fiction, knowing that it is based on a reality where children were used as commodities and people increased their wealth at the expense of children made me want to cry. The villains of the story are so thoroughly evil that I could find no empathy for them, only for the children who endured (and those who didn't) their system. On the other hand, Rill Foss is a real heroine. Although she makes the mistakes of a child, she also is a savior of her family, maybe not the way she intended, but a savior nevertheless. And in the end, despite the horrific happenings along the way, the story is one of hope.

I'm normally not a fan of books that take place in two time periods, but Wingate is able to make it work where most authors fall short. Furthermore, her tale is so well written that I figured the mystery out along with Avery, not before as so often happens when authors attempt this device. Avery's discovery of who her family is fuels her discovery of herself and her realizations about Nell. Each story fuels the other in a consistent and believable way.

I listened to the audiobook and the readers added further enjoyment through their beautiful accents and intricate acting of the story. I can still hear their voices in my mind as I think about the book.

  • The Tuscan Child

  • By: Rhys Bowen
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble, Katy Sobey
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,160
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,759
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,742

In 1944, British bomber pilot Hugo Langley parachuted from his stricken plane into the verdant fields of German-occupied Tuscany. Badly wounded, he found refuge in a ruined monastery and in the arms of Sofia Bartoli. But the love that kindled between them was shaken by an irreversible betrayal. Nearly 30 years later, Hugo's estranged daughter, Joanna, has returned home to the English countryside to arrange her father's funeral. Among his personal effects is an unopened letter addressed to Sofia. In it is a startling revelation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Knocked this one out of the park

  • By Anne on 02-22-18

Like a visit to a Tuscan village

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-18

A friend recommended this book to me as a birthday present and I'm so glad she did. The dual stories of Joanna Langley in the 70's and her father Hugo, a downed airplane pilot in WWII caught my attention early on and didn't let go. I normally don't like stories that jump back and forth in time, but the stories of Joanna and Hugo were different enough that the mechanism worked. Joanna's quest to find out what happened to her father, contrasted by her father's story as it unfolded, were interesting both as a portrait of a Tuscan village, and a tale of WWII heroism and love.