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Omar

USA
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  • For a New Liberty

  • The Libertarian Manifesto
  • By: Murray N. Rothbard
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 15 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 388
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 345
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340

In For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto, Rothbard proposes a once-and-for-all escape from the two major political parties, the ideologies they embrace, and their central plans for using state power against people. Libertarianism is Rothbard's radical alternative that says state power is unworkable and immoral, and ought to be curbed and finally overthrown.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'm a Ron Paul Libertarian but this is a good

  • By monte reed on 03-20-12

I like the libertarian ideology, I HATED this book.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-17

I first learned about the modern liberation movement from Ron Paul and liked his writings. Now, Rothbard is considered one of its champions so I thought this book should be a masterpiece, I was wrong.
Faulty logic, twisted analogies, very long narratives and severely outdated. And to add insult to injury, a very bad narration.
I needed a lot of willpower to go through 4 hours before quitting.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Modern Scholar

  • A Way With Words Part III: Grammar for Adults
  • By: Professor Michael D.C. Drout
  • Narrated by: Professor Michael D.C. Drout
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 553
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 362
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 353

Since others judge you by the way you speak, the intricacies of grammar, in fact, should not be relegated to the realm of fussy "guardians of the language," but are rather essential clues all can employ to communicate more exactly. In such a light, this course forms an invaluable guide for everyone from all fields of interest.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable & Informative

  • By Cora on 06-25-16

What is Grammar?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-16

The books is a masterpiece. For a book about grammar to be that interesting to me , a non-native speaker, it has to be really really good.
However, don't expect it to magically transform your grammar or use of language. It is more of a history and explanation of what is grammar not of grammatical rules (although it has some of those as well of course)

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Killing Pablo

  • The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw
  • By: Mark Bowden
  • Narrated by: Mark Bowden
  • Length: 5 hrs and 52 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,007
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 611
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 610

Killing Pablo is the inside story of the brutal rise and violent fall of Colombian cocaine cartel kingpin Pablo Escobar. Also from Bowden: the best selling Black Hawk Down.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Relevant Accessible History

  • By Bob on 03-25-03

Thriller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-16

It is impossible to verify the facts surrounding the hunt and killing of Escobar, so I am not sure how accurate it is. But this is as good as a nonfiction can ever be written

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Zillow Talk

  • Rewriting the Rules of Real Estate
  • By: Spencer Rascoff, Stan Humphries
  • Narrated by: Spencer Rascoff, Stan Humphries
  • Length: 6 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 687
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 570
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 564

How do you spot an area poised for gentrification? Is spring or winter the best time to put your house on the market? Will a house on Swamp Road sell for less than one on Gingerbread Lane? The fact is that the rules of real estate have changed drastically over the past five years. To understand real estate in our fast-paced, technology-driven world, we need to toss out all of the outdated truisms and embrace today's brand new information. But how?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not very informative for real estate professionals

  • By Will on 02-09-15

Confused logic!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-15

The authors regularly confuse correlation with causation, overestimate irrelevant indicators, provide what looks to me as contradictory data and loose the thread all together.
I couldn't force myself to finish the book (or should I call it the Zillow infomercial) but from the big chunk I endured I can say it is one of the worst in the genre.
Skip!

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Quiet

  • The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
  • By: Susan Cain
  • Narrated by: Kathe Mazur
  • Length: 10 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,586
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,793
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,723

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society--from van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Confidence booster for introverts their parents

  • By Neuron on 02-28-14

Fine book, but I have two problems with it!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-14

The book is original and has a lot of fresh ideas, only two comments:
- Calling introverts repeatedly "open" , "more reactive", "sensitive", "reflective" , " more consciousness", ... is for me more biased than analytical.
- While casually stating that there are no pure introverts/extroverts and we are all a little bit of both, the stories imply otherwise. There are always two poles to contrast MLK Jr. vs Rosa Parks, Eleanor vs Franklin D. Roosevelt etc. It got me lost trying to find out to which side I belong :)

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Sway

  • The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior
  • By: Rom Brafman, Ori Brafman
  • Narrated by: John Apicella
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 621
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 379
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 377

A Harvard Business School student pays over $200 for a $20 bill. Washington, D.C., commuters ignore a free subway concert by a violin prodigy. A veteran airline pilot attempts to take off without control-tower clearance and collides with another plane on the runway. Why do we do the wildly irrational things we sometimes do?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing book

  • By Martin Proulx on 12-10-08

Anecdotes!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-14

If you have before read/listened to books for Daniel Kahneman, Dan Ariely, Daniel Gilbert or any of the other great psychologists who illustrate the human biases, heuristics and mental fallacies ... then avoid this book.
The books only provides anecdotal evidence for already well studied topics while putting the whole thing in a very clumsy, shallow model.
Most of the anecdotes are entertaining though :)

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Antifragile

  • Things That Gain from Disorder
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,239
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,619
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,605

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem, and in Antifragile he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events. For what Taleb calls the "antifragile" is actually beyond the robust, because it benefits from shocks, uncertainty, and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension. The antifragile needs disorder in order to survive and flourish. Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • How to focus on impact instead of risk

  • By E. Smakman on 05-03-13

Must

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-14

It is very hard to accept all the ideas presented in this book (or any of Taleb's books) but that is an author that makes you think about and challenge everything he comes across. An instant classic.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Griftopia

  • Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America
  • By: Matt Taibbi
  • Narrated by: Patrick Egan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 697
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 473
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 466

The financial crisis that exploded in 2008 isn’t past but prologue. The stunning rise, fall, and rescue of Wall Street in the bubble-and-bailout era was the coming-out party for the network of looters who sit at the nexus of American political and economic power. The grifter class - made up of the largest players in the financial industry and the politicians who do their bidding - has been growing in power for a generation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • News In America

  • By Jerome on 11-23-10

If only...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-14

Listening to this kind of book now makes you wonder what would have happened if people back then understood all the lobbying, greediness, manipulating and pure corruption that were playing all along for years. Great listen!

Debt audiobook cover art
  • Debt

  • The First 5,000 Years
  • By: David Graeber
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 17 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 904
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 793
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 792

Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems - to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods - that is, long before the invention of coins or cash.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stands Economics on Its Head

  • By E. J. Ford on 06-06-12

Anthropology?!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-14

The book is an amazing listen, however if you are looking for an economic/financial explanation of the history of debt and its current implications, you might get bugged with the "anthropological" sides of the history ( too many tribal stories :D )

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Crash Proof 2.0

  • How to Profit from the Economic Collapse
  • By: Peter D. Schiff
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 439
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 206
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 210

The economic and monetary disaster, which seasoned Wall Street prognosticator Peter Schiff warned of in the bestselling first edition of Crash Proof, is no longer hypothetical - it is here today. And while most people believe that the economic collapse is over, the reality is that it has only just begun. That's why he's returned with Crash Proof 2.0.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eye opening look into the future of the US economy

  • By Michael on 03-07-10

Long yet incomplete.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-14

The book is generally a bit too long with lots of repetitions and it also treats the economic situations as if it (the book) provides "The right" explanation which seems to be an over simplification of a very complex world.
However, the biggest drawback is that it almost neglects the political side of the story completely! The author draws a picture where things went south because of recklessness, stupidity and mismanagement while ignoring lobbying, agency issues and pure corruption and also pin points solutions ignoring the political/social sides of the dilemma.
For me, books with less economical jargon and more political and "complete picture" approach give a better explanation (like Michael Lewis books or Griftopia or similar ones)

4 of 4 people found this review helpful