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Patrick Hart

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  • 7
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  • 53
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  • If at Birth You Don't Succeed

  • My Adventures with Disaster and Destiny
  • By: Zach Anner
  • Narrated by: Zach Anner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 938
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 885
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 883

Zach lives by the mantra: When life gives you a wheelchair, make lemonade. Whether recounting a valiant childhood attempt to woo Cindy Crawford, encounters with zealous faith healers, or the time he crapped his pants mere feet from Dr. Phil, Zach shares his fumbles with unflinching honesty and characteristic charm. By his 30th birthday, Zach had grown into an adult with a career in entertainment, millions of fans, a loving family, and friends who would literally carry him up mountains.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Zach A.

  • By Zachary D Anner on 04-07-16

Unbridled Positivity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-16

I was late to the Zach Anner fan club, so by the time I knew anything of his body of work, his book was already slated for release the next month. I found that he was just as hilarious as he was endearing. As the pretty much negative person as I am, I found his optimism and positivity void of the preachy nature I find most folk with such enthusiasm; which made me love him even more.

I had no idea what to expect from his book, just that I was sure I would laugh along with him and his particular brand of humor. What I found in listening to him speak about his life, was that his honest heartfelt nature nearly brought me to tears many times, not because of anything to do with his disability, but because of his overcoming a very real problem we all face at junctures in our lives; despair.

I needed this book. I've spent most of my life waiting for something so profoundly positive to happen to fill the chasm of negativity I had dug for myself, never even stopping to think that I could simply make the conscious choice to be more positive. As cliché as it seems, there is truth in that sometimes the easiest solutions are the hardest ones to see.

Though I may never get to thank him in person, and he'll more than likely never read this, I would like to thank him. So thanks Zach, a million times over, you are an amazing human being.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Martian

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 157,696
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 145,520
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 145,365

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he's alive - and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plainold "human error" are much more likely to kill him first.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth it even if you've seen the movie

  • By R. MCRACKAN on 12-08-17

Admittance of Bias

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-15

I was handed this book by a friend some time back, I was excited, the whole of planet earth seemed to be buzzing like cicadas about it, so I thought I was going to love it; I hated it. I couldn't believe that someone in such a terrible situation could stay so levelheaded, even with as much training as astronauts receive, so I gave it back and decided it just wasn't for me.

That being said, I used my credit this month to try again, this time in audio format, to see if that helped me get into the story a little more; it worked. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, delving deeper into the story I came to understand that his personality allowed him to cope with his situation in ways most folk wouldn't have been able to. Such a scenario of the perfect personality type being stranded on another planet alone is far fetched and will probably never happen this way, but for the story Weir set out to tell, it worked wonderfully.

So in conclusion, I was wrong to judge it so soon, it's a great book for what it is.

  • Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

  • By: Jules Verne
  • Narrated by: Peter Husmann
  • Length: 18 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,501
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,391
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,398

A mysterious sea monster, theorized by some to be a giant narwhal, is sighted by ships of several nations; an ocean liner is also damaged by the creature. The United States government finally assembles an expedition to track down and destroy the menace. Professor Pierre Aronnax, a noted French marine biologist and narrator of the story, master harpoonist Ned Land, and Aronnax's faithful assistant Conseil join the expedition.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A classic that everyone should read.

  • By John S on 07-18-13

Different From Memory

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-15

When I was a child, this book stood out as one of my favorites, and having picked up the audiobook for next to nothing, I was excited to return to such a fond part of my younger days. What I realized, was just how little I took away from the story so long ago.

What seems like half of the book is nothing more than the characters classifying every sea creature they come across, I don't know if I read the abridged version as a child or what, but I don't remember that at all. Needless to say, it bogs down the storytelling something fierce, no offense to the late Jules Verne, but good grief, I get it, your characters are smarter than the average Joe.

The story sprinkled around the endless classification is a wonderful tale, an adventure definitely worthy of admiration.

  • The Prince of Tides

  • By: Pat Conroy
  • Narrated by: Frank Muller
  • Length: 22 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,333
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,170
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,167

Spanning 40 years, this is the story of turbulent Tom Wingo, his gifted and troubled twin sister Savannah, and their struggle to triumph over the dark and tragic legacy of the extraordinary family into which they were born.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A "Prince" amongst novels

  • By Ella on 11-24-09

Art Imitates Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-15

First, I can't imagine Frank Muller ever being bumped out of my "number one audiobook voice-actor" spot. He breathes the poetry of life into every story he reads.

As for 'The Prince of Tides', the family followed within its pages, and the events that shaped their lives and personalities at times hit a little too close to home, making it an emotionally resonant story for me. Pat Conroy has a wonderful way with words even during the most basic of moments.

  • A Man Called Ove

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61,221
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56,027
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55,929

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon - the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Laughed and I Cried

  • By Bill on 08-22-15

A Run Through the Entire Spectrum of Emotion

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-15

I am certain it has been said before, but this book gives the first scene of the movie 'UP' a run for its money as one of the most heart-wrenching tales of love, loss, and an aging man's struggle to find meaning to his life after the death of his wife I have ever listened to/read.

Ove is a man that I can understand, when most folk think of a curmudgeon, they think of the toothless ninety year old who has lived too long, but Ove has been such nearly his whole life, due mostly to the events that transpire throughout. As a man a step away from thirty, events in my own life have caused me to be labeled as an angry old man before my time, so I feel akin to Ove, I love and trust only one person fully, and the thought of losing her had me tearing up as I followed Ove's story.

Fredrik Backman gave a curt flavor to the storytelling in this novel, which melded well with Ove's "man of few words" nature.

Overall, I loved every minute of it. I nearly broke down in tears too many times to count, which is a rare occurrence, so it was nice to know that I'm still human. It is sad, yes, but there is so much sweetness that runs interlaced within all of the despair that in truth, makes it all the more likely that a tear may stain your cheek.

Read it, or listen to it (the narrator, George Newborn, does a wonderful job), this is a tarnished gem of a book amidst so much drivel that gets published every year.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful