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mix579

Sudbury, MA
  • 28
  • reviews
  • 48
  • helpful votes
  • 74
  • ratings
  • Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders

  • By: Richard Ellis Preston Jr.
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 11 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 325
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 301
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 303

In a postapocalyptic world of endless snow, Captain Romulus Buckle and the stalwart crew of the Pneumatic Zeppelin must embark on a perilous mission to rescue their kidnapped leader, Balthazar Crankshaft, from the impenetrable City of the Founders. Steaming over a territory once known as Southern California — before it was devastated in the alien war — Buckle navigates his massive airship through skies infested with enemy war zeppelins and ravenous alien beasties in this swashbuckling and high-octane steampunk adventure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exuberant Steampunk Swashbuckling Adventure!

  • By Joki on 01-28-14

Nice but shallow

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-18

I must admit I got sucked in pretty quickly. A fun listening experience, a great narrator in Luke Daniels, a prose that is reminiscent of the halcyon days of pulp fiction, where action was quick, men were real men etc. Alas, the plot line is razor thin, basically two days of raiding and escaping, with a lot of shooting but not much development. At the halfway point I kind of lost interest as the whole thing got a bit repetitive. Still, i guess I will spend a credit on the next book because it was fun while it lasted, and maybe the next book has a bit more depth.

  • A Gift of Time

  • By: Jerry Merritt
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,245
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,955
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,942

When Micajah Fenton discovers a crater in his front yard with a broken time glider in the bottom and a naked, virtual woman on his lawn, he delays his plans to kill himself. While helping repair the marooned time traveler's glider, Cager realizes it can return him to his past to correct a mistake that had haunted him his entire life. As payment for his help, the virtual creature living in the circuitry of the marooned glider, sends Cager back in time as his 10-year-old self.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Time Travel for those who don't like Time Travel

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-12-17

What a mess...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-18

Actually, the book and I got off to a good start. I really liked the somewhat old-fashioned writing style of the first few chapters that reminded me of Lovecraft, combined with a conservative narration that sucked me in right away. But it went downhill quickly and turned into an incongruous mess. The initial encounter with the time glider and its inhabitant was followed by a seemingly endless middle section that was basically a relationship/coming-of-age story. You would think that imparting a ten-year-old body with the knowledge of the future would have a few more consequences than what we’re witnessing here. Just when you can’t help but wonder how long this will go on, suddenly the scenery changes dramatically and the protagonists find themselves end up fighting dinosaurs. Here the book turns into steampunk, highlighted by the operation of the time machine with, uh, hot coals… Next, we turn to made-for-movie action in the battle for the glider, just to be followed by a sappy romance section. We then move on to a tribunal scene that we’ve seen many times in Star Trek TNG, with Jean-Luc Picard explaining the aliens the errors of their way. And then we finish the whole thing up with a good dollop of love, sacrifice, devotion as unique attributes of humanity, straight from 60s sci-fi. In the end, I see this book as another illustration of the idea that less can be more. There’s some good stuff here but by throwing everything but the kitchen sink into the story, all it ended up being is just an unsatisfying blender mix of every possible sci-fi trope.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Artemis

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: Rosario Dawson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52,193
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48,697
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48,564

Jazz Bashara is a criminal. Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent. Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A ferrari with no motor

  • By will on 11-18-17

Enjoyable book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-18

To state the obvious, this is not The Martian. But Andy Weir has produced a pretty good follow-up to one of the best sci-fi books in modern history, so nothing to complain about. This is not an easy feat, as Ernest Kline showed by following up the fantastic Ready Player One with the horrible Armada. The story is straightforward, with the usual MacGyverisms we expect from Andy Weir. The most enjoyable aspect of the book though was Rosario Dawson's narration. I'd never heard her read a book before, and she blew my mind.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Willful Child

  • By: Steven Erikson
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 459
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 427
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 429

These are the voyages of the starship A.S.F. Willful Child. Its ongoing mission: to seek out strange new worlds on which to plant the Terran flag, to subjugate and if necessary obliterate new life-forms, to boldly blow the... And so we join the not-terribly-bright but exceedingly cock-sure Captain Hadrian Sawback and his motley crew on board the Starship Willful Child for a series of devil-may-care, near-calamitous and downright chaotic adventures through "the infinite vastness of interstellar space".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • All Hail Dr. Printlip!

  • By shalte on 11-05-14

Surprisingly good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-18

After the first few chapters I was thinking, oh my, this is not going to be good but it turned out to be one of the funniest SF books I've read in a while, judged by the number of moments I found myself bursting out in laughter. Couldn't help but compare it to Red Shirts and actually, I think I liked it even better.

  • Infinite

  • By: Jeremy Robinson
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,802
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,386
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,371

The Galahad, a faster-than-light spacecraft, carries 50 scientists and engineers on a mission to prepare Kepler 452b, Earth's nearest habitable neighbor at 1400 light years away. With Earth no longer habitable and the Mars colony slowly failing, they are humanity's best hope. After 10 years in a failed cryogenic bed - body asleep, mind awake - William Chanokh's torture comes to an end as the fog clears, the hatch opens, and his friend and fellow hacker, Tom, greets him...by stabbing a screwdriver into his heart. This is the first time William dies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • a rather complex science fiction story

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 12-26-17

Good narration, sophomoric writing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-31-18

What a hodgepodge of ideas, none of them particularly well executed. The whole first half of events on the ship somehow coherent although quite boring then out of nowhere comes the whole virtual reality thing with so many plot holes it hurts. The "surprise" at the end was predictable well in advance. Writing was early college level, none of the characters connected with me in any way, with the exception of the AI. Thankfully the book was over quickly. If I want to read about life as a software program, I'd rather go with Magic 2.0, at least that series is funny.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Solitude

  • Dimension Space, Book 1
  • By: Dean M. Cole
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray, Julia Whelan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,018
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,913
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,914

A mysterious wave of light wipes humanity from the planet, leaving only one person in its wake. After months of desperate isolation, Earth’s last man discovers he’s not alone. The last woman is stranded alone aboard the International Space Station. Can Vaughn find a path to space and back? Can Angela - the only person with clues to the mystery behind humanity's disappearance - survive until he does? 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What. A. Story.

  • By Brian on 06-16-17

Desperately need to waste eight hours?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-17

Then look no further -- buy this book. Last person left on Earth trying to save last person floating aboard the International Space Station. Sounds like the plot for some good fun, right? Alas,The Martian this ain't. The writing is unbearable. Over and over again the author appears to have picked some "big" adjectives or "big" phrases randomly from a dictionary to create what he probably thinks sounds like great prose -- but would get you expelled from any English college course. Even in what should be the most exciting moments he is chronically unable to create any true suspense. The dialogs? Don't get me started. Not even the last man.woman on Earth would utter such inane language. I admit, I listened through the whole book mostly curious as why this is Book 1 of a series called Dimension Space as the plot offered no hint as to how he would stretch the meager premise of the book into a series. You have to wait for the last five minutes when he begins to pull a cliffhanger out of thin air. It's then clear that this whole book is pretty much standalone and the whole "how do I save someone stranded on the ISS" action (which by the way requires some sci-fi technology) is nothing but pagefillers and the only element carried forward is "something bad has happened at CERN and maybe aliens are involved". Save yourself the money/credit and buy a good book instead.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Origin

  • A Novel
  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 18 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,382
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,472
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31,383

In keeping with his trademark style, Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code and Inferno, interweaves codes, science, religion, history, art, and architecture in this new novel. Origin thrusts Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon into the dangerous intersection of humankind's two most enduring questions - and the earthshaking discovery that will answer them.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Formula over fiction

  • By Evan M Carlson on 11-01-17

Just awful

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-17

You'd think by now Dan Brown had improved his writing skills but it's still the same stilted language and inane dialogs as in the days of the Da Vinci Code. Listening to some of the dialog scenes makes you cringe. Sounds like two AIs talking :-) If that wasn't bad enough, the idea behind this book is just enough for a novella not a full-length book. So no surprise, you hear almost the same stuff over and over again. There was a point where I thought "One more: where did we come from, where are we going, and I am going to throw my phone out of the car window". And the answers to these questions? I really hoped Dan Brown had some original ideas but what a let-down. A computer simulation to come up with a couple of warmed-up standard scifi memes that no one could possibly think would have any impact on any religious believer? The "great reveal" at the end of the identities of the regent and monte? Anyone with half a brain knew half-way through the book what was coming. And how many times did he use the same worn-out "technique" of having someone see/read/hear something of oh-so-incredible importance but I'm not going tell you what it is until you've listened to another 10 minutes of people pondering for themselves/talking to others about this stuff until you couldn't care less what it is because over and over again it turned out to be actually-not-so-important after all? Stupidly hoping there'd be some sort of big surprise at the end that would make it all worthwhile I listened to the whole thing but thankfully, there's the 1.5x feature in the Audible reader so I didn't waste more time than needed on this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Run Program

  • By: Scott Meyer
  • Narrated by: Angela Dawe
  • Length: 10 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,540
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,424
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,424

What's worse than a child with a magnifying glass, a garden full of ants, and a brilliant mind full of mischief? Try Al, a well-meaning but impish artificial intelligence with the mind of a six-year-old and a penchant for tantrums. Hope Takeda, a lab assistant charged with educating and socializing Al, soon discovers that day care is a lot more difficult when your kid is an evolving and easily frightened A.I.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining

  • By Anon on 05-22-18

Don’t listen while driving – will put you to sleep

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-17

I threw in the towel around a third into the book. My time is too precious to waste. I love the Magic 2.0 books and found Authorities solid but not great. So how can the same guy write crap like Master of Formalities and Run Program. I was bored out of my mind. The characters are trivial and stereotypes. The AI story feels like bedtime reading for little kids. And if the story isn’t enough to put you to sleep, the narrator doesn’t really help to keep you awake at all. Luke Daniels, who narrated the other Scott Meyer books, probably read the script and decided not to take the job.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Hellenic Immortal

  • The Immortal Series, Book 2
  • By: Gene Doucette
  • Narrated by: Steve Carlson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 237
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 237

An oracle has predicted the sojourner's end, which is a problem for Adam insofar as he has never encountered an oracular prediction that didn't come true...and he is the sojourner. To survive, he's going to have to figure out what a beautiful ex-government analyst, an eco-terrorist, a rogue FBI agent, and the world's oldest religious cult all want with him, and fast.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • not as good as book 1

  • By Eric on 03-15-17

Getting into it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-17

I kind of liked the first book but wasn’t quite sold. Doucette’s second book Is a solid continuation and won me over mostly due to the irreverent dry humor that is pervasive throughout the book. Initially I found the somewhat droning style of the narrator a bit irritating but now I think it’s a great fit because of the deadpan way he delivers “Adam’s” sarcasm. I just hope the series doesn’t slide down into a menagerie of weird creatures. A few too many dryads, satyrs, werewolves etc in this volume.

  • The Never Hero

  • The Chronicles of Jonathan Tibbs, Book 1
  • By: T. Ellery Hodges
  • Narrated by: Steven Barnett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,084
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,785
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,796

Reclusive college student Jonathan Tibbs wakes in a pool of blood, not a scratch on him. His life is about to undergo a massive shift. A violent and merciless otherworldly enemy unleashes slaughter in the streets, calling out in a language only he understands. And it is seeking its challenger. In order to defeat the threat, Jonathan must become a temporal weapon...while remaining completely anonymous. Unfortunately, harnessing off-world powers has its own special challenges...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tip: clear your schedule first.

  • By rhodry on 06-12-17

Crap

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-17

I am beginning to believe in the existence of paid fake reviews. How can anyone who is not a) a teenager or b) into "young adult" literature score this highly. Halfway through I finally gave up. Lousy storyline (monsters attack earth, young unsuspected earthling forced to become protector of the realm), unengaging characters, no sense of pacing, inane dialogs, irrational behavior ("look I have this glowing thing in my chest, but why would I go to the hospital, they can't help anyway"), a narrator who sounds (rightly) bored reading it, etc etc. What pushed me over the edge was the seemingly endless chapter on watching Rocky movies so the unwilling hero finally accepts his destiny. Barf.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful