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J. A. Mark Emmerson

le Gers. France and Bermuda
  • 12
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 63
  • ratings
  • The Worldship Humility

  • By: R. R. Haywood
  • Narrated by: Colin Morgan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 58 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 156
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 150
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 149

It’s been 120 years since the 50 or so worldships containing the few million survivors of the human species set off after the planet Earth was destroyed by a meteor. On the Worldship Humility, Sam, a 30-year-old Airlock Operative, is bored. Living in space should be exciting and full of adventure, except it isn’t, and he fills his time hacking 3-D movie posters and holographic adverts outside the stores in the retail zone. Petty thief Yasmine Emile Dufont is also from the WS Humility, but she is not bored....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stupendous narration

  • By Anonymous User on 02-01-19

The death of a book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-20-19

The story line had promise but I returned this book. There has to be more to an adventure than obscenities strung together and juvenile banter. The book was suffocated by them. I enjoyed the reader though.

  • Flight 232

  • A Story of Disaster and Survival
  • By: Laurence Gonzales
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 13 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190

As hundreds of rescue workers waited on the ground, United Airlines Flight 232 wallowed drunkenly over the bluffs northwest of Sioux City. The plane slammed onto the runway and burst into a vast fireball. The rescuers didn't move at first: nobody could possibly survive that crash. And then people began emerging from the summer corn that lined the runways. Miraculously, 184 of 296 passengers lived. No one has ever attempted the complete reconstruction of a crash of this magnitude.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Therapeutic

  • By Quiltedwings on 05-07-15

Almost poetry

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-17

The author, Laurence Gonzales, has written a book that has so many facts, people and stories - and stories within stories – and he does not stumbled or falters. His story is a tapestry of awe, bravery, tears, and miracles, and I kept marvelling that it is woven so very well that the unfolding of this tragic tale is seamless.
When you take a moment to consider the scope of the authors research with the survivors and the many, many people, departments and services that played important rolls in this drama and the aftermath and that he interviews them 20 odd years later, it is more than impressive that Mr. Gonzales draws you in and puts you 'there', living those moments in 1989.
What strikes me most, is the painful poetic beauty of the words used by many of the survivors in remembering.
The book is read by Victor Bevine and he handles this difficult assignment with aplomb. For me, it was a perfect match between subject matter and his pace and pitch.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Bushranger of the Skies

  • An Inspector Bonaparte Mystery
  • By: Arthur Upfield
  • Narrated by: Peter Hosking
  • Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49

An Inspector Bonaparte Mystery. An extraordinary case for Detective-Inspector Napolean Bonaparte opens when a police car is bombed from the air on a lonely outback road by a mysterious pilot who plans to conquer a nation. The trail through the Land of Burning Water tests Bonys endurance to the limit and takes the detective as close to death as he has ever been.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Page Turner, Upfield at his best

  • By L. Gayle on 10-19-09

I am disappointed

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-17

'Bushranger of the Skies'. This is the 8th book in the series by Arthur W. Upfield, and I have enjoy and delighted in each of them … before this book. The lack of stars are not due to the writing by the author who is on form, nor to the reading of the book by Peter Hosking, who is superb as usual. The lack of stars are due to the plot. It is unforgivably terrible. In order to advance the story in the direction the author wished it to go, he has the hero of his books, the redoubtable and brilliant Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte to be more stupid than the stupid and bumbling Inspector Clouseau of Pink Panther fame. Not only that, but the beautiful damsel in distress, who is given brains as well as beauty when we are introduced to her, proceeds to prove herself as stupid and naive as the simplest fool ever introduced to us in literature and in real life – and valiantly refuses to change. And Inspector Bonaparte by accepting her weak and idiotic arguments, allows her to be kidnapped … which the reader could see coming a mile off. Far, far too contrived. Pathetic. Some of the stars are admittedly taken off because of the shear disappointment that such transparent and amateurish manipulations were used. 'Till now, this was a great series and thoroughly enjoyable.

  • Chasing Ivan

  • By: Tim Tigner
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 4 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 403
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 362
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 355

Rumor has it there's a Russian you can turn to if you're very rich, and need dirty deeds done without a trace. The CIA calls him Ivan the Ghost because he's operated for years without leaving a trail or revealing his face.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best Tim Tigner Thriller

  • By Victor @ theAudiobookBlog on 03-25-16

Not for me.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-16

Immature and predictable. There is no sense of 'real' from beginning to end, which also makes it boring.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Battle

  • The Story of the Bulge
  • By: John Toland
  • Narrated by: Dan Butler
  • Length: 14 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 725
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 664
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 662

Battle: The Story of the Bulge, John Toland's first work of military history, recounts the saga of beleaguered American troops as they resisted Hitler's deadly counter offensive in World War II's Battle of the Bulge - and turned it into an Allied victory. It is a gripping work, painstakingly researched and imbued with such vivid detail that listeners will feel as though they themselves witnessed these events. This is a book not to be missed by anyone interested in this tumultuous era of our world's history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • incredible.

  • By John on 06-25-15

Surprised

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-16

Any additional comments?

This book surprised me ... in a good way. Since the book describes such an involved and large battle, I expected to find at least a few 'dry' spots, and because the battle was confusing to say the least, I also expected to become confused myself. Neither happened. The author never lost control over the subject matter and I found no dry spots. For those interested in this very important battle of the Second World War, I believe this book is worthy of your attention.

  • Cutthroat Trail

  • The Trail Series, Book 7
  • By: David R. Lewis
  • Narrated by: David R. Lewis
  • Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 197
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 181

When Ruben Beeler finds a rancher friend shot to death and mutilated, he calls on Marshals Marion Daniels and Homer Poteet for help. That call begins a chase that takes the men from St. Joe into Kansas and down to Hell on the Border and the Fort Smith court of Hangin' Judge Issac Parker. In pursuit of the killers, the Marshals venture into the Oklahoma Territory, or "The Nations" as it was known at the time, following a path of bloodlust that began before the killing of Arkansas Bill Cole. Serial killers are nothing new, as the Marshals find out on the Cutthroat Trail.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pure Genius

  • By Gary on 04-17-16

As Always

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-16

Any additional comments?

As always, five stars for the reading, the author and this series. Another wonderful journey into the past.

  • House to House

  • An Epic Memoir of War
  • By: Staff Sergeant David Bellavia, John Bruning
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,354
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,098
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,098

In one of the most compelling combat narratives ever written, Staff Sergeant David Bellavia, an Army infantry platoon leader in Iraq, gives a teeth-rattling, first-hand account of 11 straight days of heavy house-to-house fighting during the climactic second battle of Fallujah. His actions in the firefight, which included killing five insurgents in hand-to-hand combat, earned Bellavia the Bronze Star, the Silver Star, and New York state's highest military honor, the Conspicuous Service Cross.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best audio books I have listened to

  • By Michelle Miller on 01-15-12

One of the best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-16

Any additional comments?

Have read many books of this type and this is one of the very best. And the reader Ray Porter, has perfect pitch for this action packed book.. A cliff hanger and un-put-down-able.

  • Desperate Journeys, Abandoned Souls

  • True Stories of Castaways and Other Survivors
  • By: Edward E. Leslie
  • Narrated by: Patrick Cullen
  • Length: 21 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 107
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52

From Robinson Crusoe and The Swiss Family Robinson to Alive! and Adrift, tales of survival have captivated readers. Here are the most remarkable stories imaginable of maroons, castaways, and other survivors from the 1500s to the present: their moral dilemmas, their personalities, and their influence on society, literature, and art.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Reads like a text book

  • By M. C. on 03-14-06

Not boring

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-16

Any additional comments?

This book is far more than a collection of tales of the macabre for the armchair adventurer; it is filled with fascinating information of historic interest that allows the reader to regard the subject matter in a more enlightened manner. The only reason I can image for the low accounting of stars from some of the reviewers is that they were expecting perhaps a more 'Disney' like rendering of these tales – full of excitement but with very little depth.
I bought this book in 1992 and have always held it in high esteem ever since. Then I found it as an audio – and am very happy to have purchased and listened to it. The only fault I can find, is in the reading, which, to my ear sometimes sounds as if the reader is bored. This is not so bad that it distracts any from the book, but in me anyway, leaves a touch of regret, for this book is very far from dull.

  • The Scavenger's Daughters

  • Tales of the Scavenger's Daughters, Book 1
  • By: Kay Bratt
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 7 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 645
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 575
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 574

Coming of age during China’s Cultural Revolution, Benfu survived the cruel years, but he did not emerge unscathed. The Scavenger’s Daughters is the story of Benfu and his beloved wife Calli, chronicling their attempts to build a life in the turmoil and aftermath of Maoist China. At the heart of their struggle lies the pain of losing their only child. To fill the terrible hole in their lives, they take in abandoned girls - the unwanted "weeds" - as their own, lovingly caring for them as flowers in a garden.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • China's Discarded Baby Girls ... Chosen and Loved

  • By Debbie on 12-16-14

So much goodness ...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-24-15

Any additional comments?

Straight off, I confess that I became misty eyed at a few places in this book and then cried at the end. It felt good. There is so much goodness and love in the book - and hate - but the 'sunshine' lights up the 'darkness'. I felt the author did not overplay the sympathy card and this is not a soppy book by any means. Unlike another reviewer, I did not find it took away any pleasure listening to this book being read by someone who apparently cannot pronounce Chinese correctly. I suppose that is my ignorance but I am glad it did not hinder my absorption, joy and appreciation in this beautiful story.

  • The Woodcutter

  • By: Reginald Hill
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 16 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,723
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,310
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,297

Wolf Hadda's life was a fairytale - successful businessman and adored husband. But a knock on the door one morning ends it all. Universally reviled, thrown into prison, Wolf retreats into silence. Seven years later Wolf begins to talk to the prison psychiatrist and receives parole to return home. But there's a mysterious period in Wolf's past when he was known as the Woodcutter. Now the Woodcutter is back, looking for truth and revenge...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my favorite Reginald Hill books!

  • By Diana on 01-20-11

I never thought

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-15

Any additional comments?

A fascinating story and mystery. I never thought I would find a book and reader that touched upon perfection, but this comes close enough that the difference does not matter. To my mind, the author found the correct words to paint and portray every nuance of human feelings, and the reader never 'gasped' (all too prevalent) nor ever took you 'out' of the enthralling story for a moment. First rate.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful