LISTENER

Michael

Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 24
  • reviews
  • 91
  • helpful votes
  • 39
  • ratings
  • Elon Musk

  • Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future
  • By: Ashlee Vance
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 13 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43,462
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,827
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,752

In the spirit of Steve Jobs and Moneyball, Elon Musk is both an illuminating and authorized look at the extraordinary life of one of Silicon Valley's most exciting, unpredictable, and ambitious entrepreneurs - a real-life Tony Stark - and a fascinating exploration of the renewal of American invention and its new makers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best of competence porn

  • By Tristan on 08-20-16

Boring

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-17

I see most people liked the book, but I found it boring. I don't exactly know why. I found myself having to force myself into trying to finish it. I gave up and returned it.

  • Genius

  • The Life and Science of Richard Feynman
  • By: James Gleick
  • Narrated by: Dick Estell
  • Length: 20 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 458
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 384
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385

From the author of the national best seller Chaos comes an outstanding biography of one of the most dazzling and flamboyant scientists of the 20th century that "not only paints a highly attractive portrait of Feynman but also . . . makes for a stimulating adventure in the annals of science." ( The New York Times).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Biography!

  • By Douglas on 04-07-13

A one of a kind man.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-15

I enjoyed this book. It is somewhat technical, but not too much and an understanding of these things is not really necessary to enjoy the book. If you have an interest in the history of science, like I do, you will like this book. Feynman lived in a pretty cool time for his field and he himself was a pretty cool guy. Very entertaining. Also, the narrator does a good job.

  • A Dance with Dragons

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 5
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 48 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43,078
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,389
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,355

Dubbed the American Tolkien by Time magazine, George R. R. Martin has earned international acclaim for his monumental cycle of epic fantasy. Now the number-one New York Times best-selling author delivers the fifth book in his spellbinding landmark series - as both familiar faces and surprising new forces vie for a foothold in a fragmented empire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A tale of two publishers:

  • By J. Cano on 07-31-11

Why do I even waste my time?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-14

I've read good reviews about Roy Dotrice and I don't see it at all. I found him to be one of the worst narrators I've listened to. He uses the worst voices for characters. They do not fit the character's description and a few times I couldn't understand what he said because apparently he figured that character should be hard to understand. Not only do the voices not fit they sound very stupid. I wish they would have found a new narrator for this one.

As for the book, I have grown bored with reading (or listening to) them. The first three were excellent, I couldn't put them down. "A Feast for Crows" was so hard for me to stay interested in I decided to buy the audio version. I feel the same about this one. It just drags on and seemed forced, like he wrote it just because he needed to get something out there. The television show is turning out to be much better than the books, and when is that ever the case.

  • Term Limits

  • By: Vince Flynn
  • Narrated by: Nick Sullivan
  • Length: 15 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,882
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,350
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,342

In one bloody night, three of Washington’s most powerful politicians are executed with surgical precision. Their assassins then deliver a shocking ultimatum to the American government: set aside partisan politics and restore power to the people. No one, they warn, is out of their reach—not even the president. A joint FBI-CIA task force reveals the killers are elite military commandos, but no one knows exactly who they are or when they will strike next.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Term Limits

  • By David Share on 06-26-11

Very Entertaining!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-13

This was mt first Vince Flynn book and I was not disappointed. I enjoyed listening to it and I would highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys political thrillers. I think this is the only book in the series that does not include the very popular character Mitch Rapp, but I am pretty sure that in chronological order, this book comes first. I like to read books in chronological order and there are some characters from the Mitch Rapp books that also appear in this book.

I often find myself frustrated with the politicians in Washington and for that reason this book was particularly enjoyable to me. I think Flynn does a pretty good job at accurately portraying what would happen in a real life situation, and even though the story line is a bit fantastic, he seems to know what he is talking about.

I thought the narrator was very good. From what I have read in other people's reviews, there are many who would rather George Guidall over Nick Sullivan, but I thought Sullivan did well and I definitely wouldn't say that the book was ruined because of his narration.

  • A Feast for Crows

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,370
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,577
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,578

Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin’s monumental epic cycle of high fantasy that began with A Game of Thrones. Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace . . . only to be launched on an even more terrifying course of destruction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Jarring change in Dotrice's performance

  • By Pi on 06-21-12

Damn You G. R. R. Martin

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-19-13

I had to get this book because I have read all the books before this and have so much time invested in the series, but I didn't particularly enjoy it.

The truth is, this series has been dragged out too long. I like long story lines and, more than not, never want them to end, but this particular one is so slow. There is not as much story as you would think there is from just looking at the number of books. I don't know how else to explain it, it's just a slow story and questions to certain plots take forever to get answered and most haven't even been written yet.

The narrator was terrible. The voices he does for the characters are just plain bad. Many of them don't fit the characters descriptions. He puts a very elderly man's voice on a character who is not supposed to be so old or feeble, for example, and his voices for the woman's characters, forget about it.

If you have reached this book and have read this far you will probably get it regardless of what people say, I did. If I could go back though I would have never started reading. I don't think the author is going to live long enough to finish it. It has been about 17 or 18 years since the first book came out and it took, I think, 16 years for 5 books. That averages out to over 3 years a book. The last one came out in 2012 and there are supposed to be two left. Although, the last book took 5 years to write, according to Wikipedia and the next will probably take as long or longer considering that he is more into doing his HBO show.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Modern Scholar

  • Astronomy I: Earth, Sky and Planets
  • By: Prof. James Kaler
  • Narrated by: Prof. James Kaler
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 344
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 218

The heart of this course examines the planets themselves, and reveals how they are constructed and how they differ from one another. By studying the physical astronomy of all the planets in the Solar System, we can attempt to understand their true nature. Ultimately, these lectures will bring us to a greater understanding of the Solar System's creation, which brings us again back to the beginning and what it means to us as we look outward from our rotating Earth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow... just wow

  • By Anthony on 09-15-09

A Journey Through Our Solar System

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-13-13

This book is a good overview of the solar system. It is not very detailed, but it explains a great deal. The reader was above average and I enjoyed listening to this very much.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Disappearing Spoon

  • And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements
  • By: Sam Kean
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,187
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,207
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,214

Reporter Sam Kean reveals the periodic table as it’s never been seen before. Not only is it one of man's crowning scientific achievements, it's also a treasure trove of stories of passion, adventure, betrayal, and obsession. The infectious tales and astounding details in The Disappearing Spoon follow carbon, neon, silicon, and gold as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, war, the arts, poison, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining

  • By James on 10-12-10

Enjoyable Journey

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-13-13

I enjoyed this book; the story was excellent. It takes you through the periodic table, from a historic point of view. The reader was well above average and I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in chemistry. I learned many interesting facts about the elements that were not in my school books. It is also a great companion book to listen to while taking a chemistry class. That is what I did, and it made me even more interested in the class than I already was.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Modern Scholar: Elemental Matters

  • An Introduction to Chemistry
  • By: Professor Deborah G. Sauder
  • Narrated by: Professor Deborah G. Sauder
  • Length: 8 hrs and 26 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 48

In "Elemental Matters", Professor Deborah Sauder leads a comprehensive overview of chemistry, a subject that influences every aspect of daily life. Kicking off the lecture series with a revealing look at one of the planet’s most vital chemicals—water—Sauder then delves into the basics of molecular structure and chemical reactions. The course concludes with an eye-opening glimpse of 21st-century applications, such as nanotechnology and energy alternatives."

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • From Basic To Complicated With No In Between

  • By Michael on 06-13-13

From Basic To Complicated With No In Between

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-13-13

Each lesson starts with very basic ideas, which is good, but then it seems to jump right to more complicated aspects of the topics. The reader was average, but I would not recommend this unless you need a refresher and the jump will not matter.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of War

  • By: Sun Tzu
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick, Shelly Frasier
  • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 948
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 610
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 595

Written before Alexander the Great was born, this Chinese treatise on war has become one of the most influential works on the subject. Read widely in the east since its appearance 2,500 years ago, The Art of War first came to the west with a French Jesuit in 1782. It has been studied by generals from Napoleon to Rommel, and it is still required reading in most military academies of the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Just your basic Art of War translation

  • By Michael on 03-19-13

Just your basic Art of War translation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-13

If you have never read the Art of War then buy this one or some other, you will not be disappointed. It is one of the best books I have ever read. It applies to so many aspects of life that anyone from soldier to businessman can learn from it.

If you have read it before you will get nothing special from this one. It was not much different from any of the other translations that are out there.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Modern Scholar: First Principles & Natural Law: The Foundations of Political Philosophy, Part I

  • By: Professor Hadley Arkes
  • Narrated by: Professor Hadley Arkes
  • Length: 4 hrs and 19 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52

In this course of lectures, Professor Hadley Arkes seeks to recall the classic connection between morality and law. For law works by sweeping away personal choice and private judgment and replacing them with a public rule, meant to be enforced on everyone. And that state of affairs can be justified only if the law can, in fact, appeal to an understanding of the things that are more generally or universally right or wrong.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truth and Objectivity Work for the Common Good

  • By Sacrament on 11-24-12

Not very enjoyable.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-13

I was able to listen to the whole book, but I'm not running to buy the next one. I feel a little smarter because of this book and learned a little. It was slightly boring, but not enough to stop listening. I don't know if I'll buy the next one; I have plenty of more interesting books in my sights.

4 of 15 people found this review helpful