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  • The Death of Right and Wrong

  • Exposing the Left's Assault on Our Culture and Values
  • By: Tammy Bruce
  • Narrated by: Tammy Bruce
  • Length: 6 hrs and 3 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

If you've always suspected that factions on the Left are trying to destroy the values that define our civilization, this book proves it. Through The Death of Right and Wrong, author, activist, and pundit Tammy Bruce takes you inside the chilling world of the Left - a place where morals and decency have been turned on their heads and the crisp distinction between Right and Wrong has been blurred into a mushy, gray mess.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent insight

  • By Peri on 07-18-03

A genuine call to sanity!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-18

Tammy Bruce tackles not just tough moral issues, but how ideologues have wedged themselves between decent people and obviously correct positions. She invites us to take a stand for goodness and reject the PC and victim culture's degeneracy for what it is.

  • Fake Science

  • Exposing the Left's Skewed Statistics, Fuzzy Facts, and Dodgy Data
  • By: Austin Ruse
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 9 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 174
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159

You'd think we were living in the golden age of science and reason. But the truth is far more sinister, says Austin Ruse. We're actually living in the age of the low information voter, easily misled by all-too-convincing false statistics and studies. In Fake Science, Ruse debunks so-called "facts" used to advance political causes one after the other, revealing how poorly they stand up to actual science.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Right Wing Scientist has issues with this book

  • By Dorothy on 01-09-18

Both exposes and commits scientific bias

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-18

Fake Science is informative, well-researched and dives into many pressing topics in politics today. It's definitely worth a listen.

I will note that, for the same reasons the author cites and explores for the possibility of science being misused, there is similar liability in the science and presentation in the book. It's practically unavoidable in the human condition. Here's what I mean.

It is always possible to find contradictory studies that were all produced under equally rigorous scientific standards (especially in social sciences); and it is always possible to build a case on careful interpretation and presentation of a preferred set of studies, downplaying their faults or biases; while misinterpreting opposing studies or accentuating their faults - even if the goal is objectivity.

There is also the matter of whether scientific studies are actually applicable to a political debate. While debating whether global warming is occurring and whether human activities are causal, this is a perfect application of good science. Whether abortion is moral is not an application of even the best science.

Science can help us refine the definition of pregnancy and understand the beginning of fetal development. Nevertheless, abortion ultimately comes down to a philosophical debate about volition, moral categories, what qualifies any lifeform as self-owning and if that ownership in a fetus' case extends to the mother's uterus. Science has nothing to offer on these questions, but asserting the contrary can certainly mislead an audience; again, even with objectivity being the goal.

An example where science has much to say but can easily be distorted either way is in the section dedicated to homosexuality. Please note that I am a conservative and accept that the traditional family is ideal especially for children; I am also a scientist. The subject of homosexuality as presented in the book happens to offer plenty of elements to show my points about the political applicability of science and the use of science to build a narrative, given its empirical and moral dimensions.

The author approaches the subject as though the cause of heterosexuality needs no explanation as a baseline for comparing that of homosexuality, though it absolutely does. If you want to know what makes gay people gay, you must first have a decent understanding of what makes straight people straight - healthy human sexuality in general.

Lacking such a baseline and then compounding it with the accurate, lower-than-most-expect figure for the prevalence of homosexuality (1.6%), it becomes much easier to pathologize attraction to males exhibited by atypical males, all the while the attraction to males exhibited by typical females shows a precedent for healthy development of attraction to males in our species (or vice versa).

In other words, if most females healthily develop attraction to males, why couldn't a male likewise and for the same underlying reasons? It's biology, the same process that gives us intersex babies, so accepting this as a possibility is not unreasonable though the author scarcely entertains it.

The author then correctly points out that defining homosexuality is difficult (preference, behavior, identity, etc.), further obscuring the possibility of homosexuality in a man developing for the same reasons as heterosexuality in a woman or vice versa. The author could have narrowed down the definition himself for the sake of the analysis, but by keeping it ambiguous, he has presented the audience with the opportunity to define homosexuality however they want which may include writing off the heart of the issue: those people who are just as same-sex attracted as straight people are opposite-sex attracted.

Moving from biology to psychology, without considering the effects it would have on a straight woman to attempt to make her attracted to women; it is impossible to determine whether doing the same to a gay man is a net positive. Praxeologically speaking, we choose which preferences to act on, but we do not choose what preferences we experience; so whether the person is gay or straight, insisting that their preference is wrong and some other preference is right is essentially psychological abuse.

So even if the dangers of the behavior of many men who have sex with men are evident (one of the few, if not only comparison of homosexuals to heterosexuals the author accepted); and even if the relative fluidity of human sexual attraction over time is substantiated; it does not follow that attempting to alter same-sex attraction at will is either possible or desirable, though many readers could be forgiven for thinking this is the author's - and thus science's - conclusion.

My point in this review, and a point the author makes well in the book otherwise, is that it is very easy to misuse science for the sake of constructing a narrative. Even in using perfectly valid studies, the way the data is presented or discussed can leave an impression on the mind of the audience that a cold analysis of the study wouldn't justify. On all political matters where science has something to say, it requires an attentive and critical audience to come to justified conclusions.

  • Brainwashed

  • How Universities Indoctrinate America's Youth
  • By: Ben Shapiro, David Limbaugh - foreword
  • Narrated by: Chris Abell
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 303
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 271
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 269

When parents send their children off to college, Mom and Dad hope they'll return more cultivated, knowledgeable, and astute - able to see issues from all points of view. But, according to Ben Shapiro, there's only one view allowed on most college campuses: a rabid brand of liberalism that must be swallowed hook, line, and sinker.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • From 2010, but still current

  • By Katarina on 02-25-18

Great coverage of a serious cultural problem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-18

Shapiro provides comprehensive and journalistic coverage of the leftist bias in American universities across a variety of issues and through numerous examples. I would like to have seen more of the reasons leading to the situation discussed, but the scope of the book was appropriate as it stands.

My only complaint is his conflation of negative attitudes towards religion in scientific disciplines with the prevailing anti-conservative bias. He does not account for the fact that the scientific method depends on the willingness of researchers to discard failed hypotheses in favor of those better substantiated.

Creationism, for example, brings an assumed conclusion to the table; and, as a matter of faith, is not subject to rejection. For this reason, it and similar convictions do not belong in science regardless of political persuasion. This means that even if universities were as conservative as they are leftist now, science departments would still be just as likely to instruct students not to treat purportedly inerrant religious claims as valid hypotheses, purely to uphold the integrity of the method.

It is this humility in the pursuit of knowledge that both the religious and the left (which is fundamentally a religion after all) would do well to remember when speaking on matters of fact.

  • The Age of Cryptocurrency

  • How Bitcoin and Digital Money Are Challenging the Global Economic Order
  • By: Paul Vigna, Michael J. Casey
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 14 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,067
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 942
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 939

Bitcoin became a buzzword overnight. A cyber enigma with an enthusiastic following, it pops up in headlines and fuels endless media debate. You can apparently use it to buy anything from coffee to cars, yet few people seem truly to understand what it is. This raises the question: Why should anyone care about bitcoin? In The Age of Cryptocurrency, Wall Street journalists Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey deliver the definitive answer to this question.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • absolutely fascinating, yet scary and exciting,

  • By Larry V. on 04-13-15

Weak on theory, strong on research

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-15

The authors clearly do not have a firm grasp on economic theory. They exhibit the shallowest understanding of monetary theory permissible for writing a book like this; they neglect the origin and function of prices and interest rates. They even succumb to several popular, albeit demonstrably absurd economic fallacies, including their conception of monopoly and monetary policy. They make up for these glaring problems with gripping analysis and comprehensive research.

14 of 17 people found this review helpful